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NotTy
09-11-2011, 10:59 AM
I've been reading a lot about this coat hanger antenna said to be better than most store bought antennas. I have a huge antenna I bought a couple years ago, one that I was told I would need to receive my local channels & tried finding the best spot possible but 1 channel is all I get reliably. I live 50 miles south of Seattle but I'm unable to pick up the local channels. The only one I do get is 40 miles nw from me. I live in the sticks and there's a lot of hills all around me.

But I've been reading that this coat hanger antenna along with a few other home made antennas, out perform some of the best aerial antennas on the market.
Has anyone here heard about this or have had any experience with this?

Also, I've read that nearly all TV channels are now UHF, even if their allocated TV station number is in the VHF range, the actual frequency is in the UHF range now since the transition. My antenna picks up all kinds of bands & frequency.

Maybe simpler is better.

boba
09-11-2011, 02:23 PM
Start off with TV Fool (http://www.tvfool.com) and find out what you need to receive your local broadcasters. If home made antennas were so easy and FOOL proof why would 50 year old companies still be in business?

NotTy
09-11-2011, 03:31 PM
Start off with TV Fool (http://www.tvfool.com) and find out what you need to receive your local broadcasters. If home made antennas were so easy and FOOL proof why would 50 year old companies still be in business?
I have been to that sight hundreds of times.
My chalk line strings constantly break at work rendering a chalk line that's been used 4 or 5 times useless. But I don't replace that string with the same string designed to break again 4 or 5 times later, but I do replace it with another kind of string that is about 1/8th the price & lasts 50 to 75 uses. But yet that string company is still in business after 84 years.

I guess the only way to really find out is to try this and see. This might take a few days or a week or two but I will probably post my results here when I'm done.

I was just wondering if anybody else has done this.

boba
09-12-2011, 09:57 AM
I have been to that sight hundreds of times.
My chalk line strings constantly break at work rendering a chalk line that's been used 4 or 5 times useless. But I don't replace that string with the same string designed to break again 4 or 5 times later, but I do replace it with another kind of string that is about 1/8th the price & lasts 50 to 75 uses. But yet that string company is still in business after 84 years.

I guess the only way to really find out is to try this and see. This might take a few days or a week or two but I will probably post my results here when I'm done.

I was just wondering if anybody else has done this.If you been to TVFOOL hundreds of times have you read it? It will tell you wether yout channels are broadcast on UHF or VHF. The 50 year reference was to Winegard and Channel Master which I see listed in your owned products. Maybe the Channel Master 3671 isn't the best antenna for your location Wa covers a large amount of territory. Homemade antennas depend a lot on the ability of the builder, seeing the CM3671A/B are fringe area antennas you might just be too far away for reliable reception. TV FOOL will give you a pretty good idea of what is possible but each case is different.

Iceberg
09-12-2011, 10:15 AM
Also, I've read that nearly all TV channels are now UHF, even if their allocated TV station number is in the VHF range, the actual frequency is in the UHF range now since the transition
you might want to verify that. While most of that is correct, stations that were in the 7-13 range in a lot of cases moved back to those frequencies (VHF Hi)

Checking the FCC these stations are on VHF HI in Seattle
KIRO 7 (CBS)
KCTS 9 (PBS)
KSTW 11 (CW)
KCPQ 13 (FOX)

all stations above are on their analog number. SO make sure the antenna can get both VHF & UHF

NotTy
09-12-2011, 10:35 AM
The 3 stations I really want are 45 miles north & broadcast in the UHF range even though they're known as 4, 5 and 7. The 1 channel I do get is broadcasted in the VHF range. There's a lot of hills between me & them and I think that has to be the problem. I'm not in a hole or anything, no tall building nearby, actually, no buildings period for at least 7 or 800 feet. The tree line starts at about 300 feet.

I know I'm in a difficult area & the antenna I have was recommended. All the cable was new when I bought the antenna & is supposed to be quad shielded. The cable doesn't touch any surfaces & is even fed through wire holders under the floor. The wire connects directly to the TV, there are no splitters or any other connections between the TV & the antenna. The balun is new, the second one in 3 years, since it was suggested once that my balun could be defective. My antenna is currently about 38 feet above the ground.

I've exhausted myself trying to figure this out. It seems to puzzle a lot of people since I've talked to people who are 70 & 80 miles from their TV stations & receive a solid signal, but in my case, it has to have something to do with the terrain I'm sure.

Anyway, this coat hanger antenna is said to be easy to build & receives signals 60 to 70 miles away with plenty of signal strength. I have the coat hangers, wire, drill, bolts, screws & soldering iron. It looks like it will cost me about $0.03 cents to build & that's for the electricity.

It would really be something if it did work, but I'm skeptical myself but it'll be a good learning experience either way.

NotTy
09-12-2011, 10:42 AM
you might want to verify that. While most of that is correct, stations that were in the 7-13 range in a lot of cases moved back to those frequencies (VHF Hi)

Checking the FCC these stations are on VHF HI in Seattle
KIRO 7 (CBS)
KCTS 9 (PBS)
KSTW 11 (CW)
KCPQ 13 (FOX)

all stations above are on their analog number. SO make sure the antenna can get both VHF & UHF

Sorry Iceberg, I didn't see your post until now.
I recently checked 4,5 & 7 & were reported to be in the UHF range.
Channel 13 did show to be in the VHF range.

I'll double check.

Iceberg
09-12-2011, 10:49 AM
4 & 5 are on UHF (VHF LO stations have interference issues) but the others I posted are on VHF Hi

Larry1
09-12-2011, 10:57 AM
The coat hanger antenna will only give good performance on UHF channels and should not be any better than what you have already. What would improve your reception, as I do not see it mentioned, is a good quality pre-amplifier like a Channel Master or Winegard. Be sure to look for very low noise factor, and stay away from any that do not give a noise factor rating.

Iceberg
09-12-2011, 10:57 AM
I was wrong. Checked some more info and 7 is on UHF....I misread ;)

But 9, 11 & 13 are on VHF Hi

Reigster at SatelliteGuys