Dish alignment meter

Discussion in 'DISH Network Support Forum' started by dude2, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. dude2

    dude2 Thread Starter PIT MEMBER

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    When my tech installed my dish 1000 he used a meter that was powered by the 622 and would pick the strongest siginal from a sat for peaking. I asked him why he didn;t have a self powered meter and peak in the weakest transponder with it.
    Installers: here is the answer I got. 'That meter is too expensive and it doesn;t make any difference what transponder you peak in on it will align the same. Do you guys that install, agree with this statement.
    The strongest he could get on 129 transponder 22 was 59%. Dish techs tell me that is too weak and the tech asked me how could he get it any better. I told him that was his problem and not mine. He got mad packed up his gear and left.
    Any time it rains I loose home and garden which I watch much.
     
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  2. Scott Greczkowski

    Scott Greczkowski Welcome To SatelliteGuys!
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    They are going to be boosting the power of some of the transponders on 129 tommorow (they said this last night on the tech chat) I am guessing that you are in the North West.
     
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  3. webbydude

    webbydude SatelliteGuys Family

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    To the OP, your installer is correct...more or less. Although I do use a self-powered meter. Too much of a pain to constantly rely on the receiver to power the meter. And as far as your transponder/aim thing. It doesn't matter WHAT transponder you peak on. The installer is going to peak on the signal from the particular satellite. Some transponders are going to have stronger signals than others. Admittedly, a 59 on the 129 is pretty weak. But as Scott said, Dish is going to be boosting some of the weaker transponders to hopefully help things.
     
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  4. rcdallas

    rcdallas PIT MEMBER

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    Working with Dish Network equipment, really you don't need much of a meter. It's nice to have one that can power the lnb itself so your not using the reciever to power it.

    Personally I've picked up the Dual Buddy from Applied Instruments, paid a nice penny for it.

    The highest I've ever tuned a D1000 is 90 all across the 110/119/129. I've done it once, it must have been a good day, while other's I'm fighting with the 110/129 I either have one or the other.

    It would not be unheard of to have 90 or so on the 110/119 while the 129 could be in the mid to low 70's. That in return is beyond control of the installer.

    Hopefully it's all a thing of the past now....
     
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  5. Hall

    Hall SatelliteGuys God
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    I know that in the past, DirecTV install manuals made it clear that you shouldn't pick any particular transponder to peak off of.

    What numbers do you get on 110 and 119 ??
     
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  6. sprintcarcrazy

    sprintcarcrazy Active SatelliteGuys Member
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    From Central MO, around 90 on 110/119, 77 on 129, I had to haunt the installer to get a good signal, he was going to wal off with 129 in 60's and 110/119 in the 70's, he had to call in and get help to align the thing.
     
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  7. webbydude

    webbydude SatelliteGuys Family

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    Ugh! Yeah, I don't blame you one bit! As Dallas said, 90's for 110, low 100's for 119, and high 70's/low 80's for the 129 seems to be the norm. And even with "low 80's", that's an exception to the rule for the 129.
     
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