Installer training

Discussion in 'General CableTV & Satellite Forum' started by AlexisNeel, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. AlexisNeel

    AlexisNeel Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Posts:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi everyone. I am interested in becoming an installer (changing careers) and wonder if there is a place on the net where I can get "trained", download some useful installation instructions, etc. I feel lucky to have found this site and hope that I can join this exciting field. Or if none of the above, how does one go about getting trained to be an installer?

    Thank you for any info you can pass my way.

    Alexis
     
    #1
    Avatar

    Advertisements Register Today!



    Reigster at SatelliteGuys
  2. PSB

    PSB On vacation

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2003
    Posts:
    0
    Likes Received:
    0
    Welcome to the forum, you can learn a LOT just here at satelliteguys.us!

    Here is the best way to learn all about the art of satellite installation and whats required ( TRUCK + Breathing : ) )

    www.dbsinstallsupport.com
     
    #2
  3. AlexisNeel

    AlexisNeel Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Posts:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Peter,

    Thanks for the link. I have read that a few days before. So you mean thats it?!?!? Certainly there is more to it than that. :D It sounds so easy.

    Since I first posted the first one, I found the SBCA organization and their NSTP certification training programs around the country. Seems like there are a lot of them. I just got off the phone with a guy who owns a company that has a major upgrade contract in TN. He offered on the job training and certification while I get paid. I'm only hesitent because it sounds too good to be true. Are there THAT good of job opprotunities available in this field? He's telling me that they pay $45 to $50 per visit to upgrade existing systems...not new installs, and since they are grouped together, that you can get 8 to 9 done in a day. They work 7 days a week and have about 35,000 customers needing the work. :eek: For someone who's been out of work for a while, this is sounding too good to be true. Alls I need is a truck, and the basic tools, and I'm in. I might have to give it a try. I'd only be out about $200 if it turns out to be a bust.

    Wish me luck! And I'd like to hear any opinions to all this.

    Alexis
     
    #3
  4. wobbie

    wobbie Active SatelliteGuys Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Posts:
    569
    Likes Received:
    0
    Try to get everything in writing, as far as the "BASIC TOOLS" the basic tools, could add up to be a little pricey ecspecially if you've been out of work for a while. Ladders, drills, inclinometer, satellite finder, let alone gas, and insurance, if you need to have that. Check to see what they suuply as far as iinstallation supplies also. Maybe a ride along with another tech wouls be a good idea.
     
    #4
  5. AlexisNeel

    AlexisNeel Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Posts:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wooble,

    The list didn't sound bad. A good drill gun (I'm assuming cordless) a compression tool, stripper, screw driver, compass 7/16" socket and a channel master meter, which is the most expensive thing. So maybe around $300. Lodging is paid for for the first 2 weeks, then a monthly stipend of $250.


    Anyway, I think you are right...I just need to go and see it for myself...especially the part about being able to do 8 or 9 upgrades in a day. If thats possible, then whatever the outlay is, its worth it.

    Thanks for your opinion.

    Alexis
     
    #5
  6. Stargazer

    Stargazer Supporting Founder
    Supporting Founder

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2003
    Posts:
    15,434
    Likes Received:
    28
    The only training and test I have seen online and its free is for StarBand at their website.
     
    #6
  7. CablerMN

    CablerMN Member
    Supporting Founder

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    If this is not an employee position - as in this is a sub-contractor opportunity - remember that you are going into business for yourself. Vehicle, fuel, insurance (commercial vehicle liability, general liability, worker's compensation, unemployment), tools, material, uniforms, taxes (local, state, federal, self-employment), state licensure (if any), etc are all your responsibility.

    When we contract inexperienced subs we try to talk them out of it by showing all the negative points and see if they are still interested at the end. If so, then we send them out for a half day ride along to see first hand what it is we do. We lose more prospects with the ride along then we do with the initial meeting. The contractor life is not for everyone - nor is running your own small business.

    As for training, OJT is probably one of the best ways to get your feet wet. The NSTP certification from the SBCA is good practical technical and legislative info, but frankly I would never send anyone in the field that only had the SBCA cert under their belt. After some OJT and with some construction aptitude then it all comes down to figuring out how it works best for you with the guidelines given. Not every installer does things the same way. Pride in workmanship and treating a customer's home as your own, aesthetically speaking, go a long way.

    Wish you good luck!
     
    #7
  8. AlexisNeel

    AlexisNeel Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Posts:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks CablerMN. Very good reply.
    I'm used to running my own biz...did so for 11 years till the economy, 9/11 and changing of how things are done in my industry forced me to close. And while I'd prefer to work for someone else (pay withou the headaches) I'm not finding too much out there. SO this seemed to be a way to provide much needed income for my family.

    I'm still trying to estimate the full cost of this proposition. Tools seem to be around $400, then there's the truck (found a used one for $2500) and all the other things that go along with being a sub. The one thing I am not clear on is supplies and if I have to provide the supplies or does the company. Still figuring things out.

    I do have a pride in work work ethic and am good with customer service. I've done a wide range of building out spaces/interiours of warehouses, so that I feel comfortable with. Not sure about the whole contractor life though...hadn't given that much thought. My main problem is that I am in need of work...badly! And I hope I'm not going about this wrong. Perhaps the best thing to do is the ride along and see for myself before making the decision.

    I appreciate your thoughts, and will post back here on the results.

    Alexis
     
    #8
  9. mikekohl

    mikekohl Supporting Founder
    Supporting Founder

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2004
    Posts:
    644
    Likes Received:
    4
    My past experience is that the best (and quickest) way to learn the trade of satellite antenna installation would be to find a local retailer that is willing to hire you as a helper for their installation department. Spend some time in the trenches learning all of the mechanics of the job, and ask lots of questions..
    if you have a co-worker willing to share their knowledge. At some point, you should be able to jump in to the duties of an installer on your own.
    Many regional distributors work with satellite dealers to provide training
    and certification of installers, at periodic workshops. If you have found
    someone willing to hire you as an entry level installer, perhaps they would
    also be willing to support you with such training (seminar type).

    Mike
     
    #9
  10. CablerMN

    CablerMN Member
    Supporting Founder

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Posts:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Alexis,

    You may want to rethink that tool figure. Could easily burn up the $400.00 between a fiberglass extension ladder and an 18V cordless drill. Still have all of your cable crafting tools, bits, basic hand tools, satellite meter etc.

    FWIW
     
    #10
  11. ciaraco

    ciaraco Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Posts:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just put a second man on and the equipment cost for basic tools, ladders, meter, power tools and bits ran $1785. We put all that into a 91' Chevy astro w/ ladder racks, tool bins and bulk head for $3500. Then you get to spring for commercial plates and insurance. Good insurance (2mil.) runs around $350 a quarter. So I guess your looking at around $5700. To be honest I'd put that at a low estimate. It's debatable though. I buy high quality, over priced tools. Hope that helps...
     
    #11
  12. robert luzzi

    robert luzzi Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Posts:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    some advice ,

    call directv at 1800.531.5000 and ask them for the HSP in your area and get hired by them. they will train you , you will get certified free and have a vehicle and insurance. then if you like it by all means go on your own. ours is a great enterprise, THERE ARE PITFALLS TOO! (prime, big sky) you also get total choice for free!!!!!
     
    #12

Share This Page

VigLink badge
Sucuri