Is it possible to get DirecTV on a TV in a room without a DTV box in it?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Support Forum' started by ccualumni, May 28, 2011.

  1. ccualumni

    ccualumni Thread Starter New Member

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    We recently closed in a room and want to put a TV in it. Instead of getting another box from DirecTV and paying an additional $5/month for it, we would like to use the signal from an existing TV in the room.

    I had a friend that did this about 10 years ago and it worked just fine. You have the same show on each TV, but that is not a problem for us.

    The problem and question is how do we do this. The room does not have a cable outlet so we would have to get one installed if it is even possible. We do not want to do this to save money (we already have 6 boxes that we rent each month).

    I tried searching the net, but could not find much except for the X10, but it seems that you could only send just a PPV movie or maybe just one channel. It would be nice to be able to change channels while in the other room.


    The TV signal was shared through a wireless signal.

    Based on where the new room is, I cannot run a cable to it, so splitting the cable from the box is out of the question.

    I was hoping to be able to somehow send the signal from the box to the other TV (maybe wirelessly).

    This is what I found online and looks pretty good:
    I guess I cannot post URLs... The site is X10 and can beam the signal wirelessly.

    Thanks,
     
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  2. charper1

    charper1 Bourbon Tester
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    Is the originating box a HD box? Anyway they should have multiple set of outputs so you can use one to serve each room (same channel selection though). How far is the cable run going to be?

    Also, adding a RG6 run to the new room (yep, you should have planned for that before you enclosed it) is not very expensive and easy to do also. This will also provide the best overall outcome too.
     
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  3. JerseyMatt

    JerseyMatt Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    Those wireless senders are garbage. They run in the already overcrowded 2.4GHz band, so everything from your cordless phone to Wifi to your microwave will interfere with it. I tried them years ago for a security camera link, and it would barely work in the same room as the transmitter. You need to use a wired connection.
     
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  4. Joe Diamond

    Joe Diamond SatelliteGuys Family

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    To restate:


    An output from your receiver can be split. You can use the coax output to the distant TV and the component cables to the close TV. You cam connect a modulator and run different forms of wire.

    The wifi solutions suck.

    Joe
     
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  5. DVDDAD

    DVDDAD Supporting Founder
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    Which DirecTV receiver do you want to connect the two TV's to? Please tell us if any or both of the TV's are HDTV's and if one TV is an HDTV and the other a SDTV, which TV is in which location realitive to the DirecTV receiver? This would help us give you some additional wireless solutions.
     
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  6. Aridon

    Aridon Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    All of the outputs on the D* box are active. <br />
    <br />
    Buy a RF box from Walmart, connect it to the D box. The boxes have different inputs / outputs. Depending on what you want to use to connect the other TV. In our case I used a cheap box with composite (red, white yellow jacks) to connect to our D* receiver and Coax out to the TV. We had different drops for our D receiver so the old cable coax in the wall worked just fine for us and the tv was in the bedroom (small enough to not care about HD).<br />
    <br />
    Then connect that box via coax or whatever you want (depending on distance / what you have available) to the other tv. Use the remote in UF mode so it works through walls.

    You could also run an HDMI or composite cables to the box and do the same thing.

    Stay away from the wireless boxes though those things aren't worth a crap IMO.
     
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  7. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Studebaker driver
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    Most of us have a modulator in the closet that's not being used. It's called a vcr! Most have composite inputs and a coaxial output.
     
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  8. meldar_b

    meldar_b Member

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    just add a rf spliter from the satellite receiver thats what I did :cool:
     

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  9. jcrandall

    jcrandall Proud Staff Member
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    If it is an HD box you can use each output. I have several receviers with the HDMI used for a long run of 75'-100' and component used locally. I also have one setup with the HDMI splitt via a 1-4 splitter that feeds three TVs.

    Monoprice is a great place for cheap cables. I have cheap component cables in the classified forum.

    I completely agree, avoid the wireless options at all cost, they hardly ever work and are not reliable.
     
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  10. Dennis Brown

    Dennis Brown Member

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    I don't understand the negative comments about wireless options. I have a Channel Vision E 1200 connected to an HR 24. It is set to channel 20 (an unused channel) and the signal is available on this channel on all my tv's. Of course, the signal is st not hd but there is no degradation in signal quality. I also have HD in a room without the HR 24. But that required purchasing a powered HDMI splitter from Monoprice and pulling an HDMI cable thru the attic, a major pain.
     
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  11. Grumpy Gil

    Grumpy Gil New Member

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    I have the signal off an HR22 via HDMI to the TV in the main room and via a 40' run of RG6 the same output(RF output) to a separate room. An RF remote control allows me full control of that box. The picture qual. is good enough on that set. Works for me and now the kids their cartoons.:)
     
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  12. Geronimo

    Geronimo Supporting Founder
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    there are wireless senders in the 5.8 Ghz range that work quite well with SD pictures.
     
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  13. twizt3dkitty

    twizt3dkitty SatelliteGuys Family

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    Just FYI, I had a 10m (33ft) hdmi cable off new egg, not work, got a new one, didn't work, got a different name brand... Still didn't work. Had Samsung tell me tht they only support 6' cables officially. I went with hdmi over cat5.... Then said f-u Samsung.
     
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  14. jdspencer

    jdspencer SatelliteGuys Family

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    This is fine if the receiver isn't an HD model (They don't have RF outputs.)
     
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  15. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Studebaker driver
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    You can go from the composite outputs to a vcr input, to the coax output. Who doesn't have a vcr in their closet?
     
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