cable card for dish network

Discussion in 'DISH Network Support Forum' started by tritron, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. tritron

    tritron Topic Starter Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member

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    I wonder how does the dish network gets around without making cable card type devices avaiable to public. It seems to me that communication act of 1996 requires it.
    "...assure the commercial availability to consumers of multichannel video programming and other services offered over multichannel video programming systems, of converter boxes, interactive communications equipment, and other equipment used by consumers to access multichannel video programming and other services offered over multichannel video programming systems, from manufacturers, retailers, and other vendors not affiliated with any multichannel video programming distributor."
    It would be great if fcc makes dish comply with it requirments then we could make our own dvr? In europe one can buy just smart card and watch programing and have dvr base on vdr.
     
  2. goaliebob99

    goaliebob99 SatelliteGuys Master
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    Ummmm. That quote doesn't say that they are required to offer such device. It just says that they have to accept 3rd party devices on their system. Now if nobody makes one, then thats a totally different story. Also a cable card wont work as its totally different technologies.
     
  3. Juan

    Juan Supporting Founder
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    a cablecard just unencrypts the signal..the hardware that receives the signal is the hardpart
     
  4. goaliebob99

    goaliebob99 SatelliteGuys Master
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    Yes, but the technology cable card uses to decrypt the signals is not the same that dish uses. Also, its totally different modulation systems, so once the cable card received the satellite signal, it would have no idea what to do with it as its a signal that the cable card is incompatible with.
     
  5. tritron

    tritron Topic Starter Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member

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    Well cable card is for cable television only but there is nothing like it for dish. There are number of recivers fta capable of reciving dish in HD and there is genpix for pc. We are just missing being able to get smart card and Common Interface module (CAM) capable of descrambling programmes encrypted in Nagravision.
     
  6. Juan

    Juan Supporting Founder
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    they both use mpeg 2 (atleast fios does)the hardware demodulates the signal(tv's dont have satellite receivers built in them just digital cable boxes)..the smartcard just allows the signal to be viewed..its not the smart card that demodulates the signal it would be rather expensive to build a TV that can do d*,E*,cable and fios
     
    #6 Juan, Jan 24, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  7. keeletronix

    keeletronix SatelliteGuys Family

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    Besides satellite providers are not classified the same as cable providers. Satellite providers are classified as satellite providers. And Cable providers are entertainment providers.
     
  8. whatchel1

    whatchel1 SatelliteGuys Master

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    1 more thing

    Cable cards don't decrypt encrypted signals. They only work on "in the clear" signals. Sat siganls have been encrypted since not long after that ruling was written. The encryption has changed several times and is different for different carriers.
     
  9. Juan

    Juan Supporting Founder
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    [ame]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_card[/ame]


    The card acts like a unique "key" to unlock the channels and services to which the cable customer has subscribed, and the television's remote-control will also control the cable channels. Televisions that support CableCARD should be labeled by the manufacturer as "digital cable ready", or DCR.
     
  10. DishSubLA

    DishSubLA SatelliteGuys Pro

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    1. Completely separate legislation rules satellite and cable, so satellite is not the least required to provide any kind of cable card solution. There are many things cable can and can't do that satellite can and can't do because on piece of legislation regulates cable TV (they have to do quite a few things at no charge to the customer because they are required by law) and another piece of legislation regulates DBS satellite TV (they are not required to do ANYTHING for free for the customer).

    2. Neither is Verizon FiOS, required by law to provide any kind of cable card solution (separate legislation governs fiber networks and separate legislation governs copper networks). However, 3rd party boxes using the Cable Card will work on FiOS only because that while FiOS is a Fiber to the Premises (or Home) system, the final "mile" into your home to all your equipment is via coaxial cable using the CableLabs (cable TV) specification. So, essentialy, once FiOS reaches your home, it then becomes cable TV just like the cable cos.

    3. The cable cos. intentionally did all they could to leave satellite out of the Cable Card specification, and, at the time, both Direc TV and Dish were really pissed about it and even sent a formal letter of complaint to Congress about it.

    Since the Cable Card has now been officially been considered a failure by the FCC and considering the massive problems experienced by TiVo and, to a lesser degree, Moxie, it seems Direc TV and Dish can thank their lucky stars they were not invited to the party. The big news now is what will replace the stinkin' Cable Card. Let's hope the FCC doesn't let CableLabs design it. Several manufacturers have already suggested a replacement, but I forgot what it was.

    Unlike cable TV that has a specification from CableLabs that essentially means all cable cos. use the same specification, satellite has no such common or industry specification. This means it would be very expensive for 3rd parties to design equipment that would work for both DBS companies, and most likely NO company would make such equipment because the economies aren't so good unless there is standardization, like for cable TV. While at its foundation DBS technology is the same, how Direc TV and Dish Network handle the challenge of looking at several satellites and support multiple single and dual tuners boxes in one home is VERY different. Direc TV''s SWM system and Dish Network's DishPro technology are completely different and incompatable. Also incompatible is the platform each uses for SD with Direc using its proprietary DSS while Dish uses DVB (for HD both use DVB). Furthermore, both companies now use other satellite bands in additions to DBS: Direc using Ka sats for HD while Dish uses a Ku FSS sat for internationals (Dish also used it in the past for other Dish services.)

    Now, you can see with all those hardware and software differences, the economies and unpredictability of technology change from either company and the need to future-proof--adding more cost for a 3rd party--the boxes to Direc and Dish specifications (Dish downloaded Turbo Coding on its HD boxes well after those boxes had been out in many homes, but that requires the proper chip, and other hardware that had to built-in ahead of time otherwise a lot of people with improper 3rd party boxes would have no longer been able to view Dish HDTV) makes a 3rd party see that it is too expensive and not enough return to even bother to manufacture boxes that can work with either DBS company.

    I hope that answers your question.
     
    #10 DishSubLA, Jan 25, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2010

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