HDB91X Antenna

rodder

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Adairsville,Ga 30103
i bought a HDB91X antenna to pick up Chattanooga stations 60 miles away along with a Winegard LNA-200
amplifier suppose to be good for 70 miles but it will only pick 10 of my 30 stations my old cheap antenna would pick up 30 i have tried unplugging the amplifier made it even worse this is a high rated antenna any tips what may be wrong
 

comfortably_numb

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I tried that antenna at one point. At my location, the performance was no better than an RCA ANT751R. I also use a Channel Master CM-7777HD preamp. I am receiving stations 45 miles away.

I ended up giving the HDB91X to a friend.

How far away are your stations? Can you post a www.tvfool.com report?
 
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Voyager6

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I believe that the HDB91X is a highly directional antenna. I would try changing it's direction by 1 degree at a time and maybe changing the height slightly. Also, it is primarily for UHF If you are trying for long distance VHF channels, the HDB91X may not be the best choice.
HDB91X - Xtreme Signal
Xtreme Signal 70 Mile VHF/UHF Yagi Outdoor TV Antenna (HDB91X) from Solid Signal
Key features
  • Simply one of our strongest HDTV antennas for long-range reception
  • Receives stations from up to 70 miles away on UHF and up to 25 miles for high-VHF channels
  • 16dB of gain for ultra-high reception in a compact TV antenna
  • Directional design allows for reception within a 60° beamwidth
  • Large back reflector suppresses interference with a high front-to-back ratio of 26dB
 

rodder

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Before i moved last year i was using a Channel Master CM-4221 and it done very good but i thought i would try this one i will probably
sent this back and order that one
 
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primestar31

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Mar 15, 2005
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Beats me why yours aren't working well, there must be something wrong with them. They are uhf ONLY though. I have TWO of them up and running right now, and they are excellent antennas! I've had one installed for over 5 years now, and added another for a specific channel that's in a different direction, and included a vhf antenna for my one vhf station.

So, a total of 3 antennas in my array, including a Jointenna device for the two UHF antennas feeding into FM trap (I have strong fm radio stations very close), then a Kitztech KT-200 preamp, then into the uhf side of a UVSJ combiner. My Y10-7-13 vhf only antenna feeds into another FM trap, then into the vhf side of the UVSJ, bypassing the Kitztech preamp. Then the single quadshield rg-6 coax goes to the back of my tv center in the living room, into the power inserter for the preamp, then into two splitters which feeds a bedroom tv set, my living room tv set, and my Tivo.

Everything works perfectly. Though 40 years ago I was a Winegard dealer, and installed antenna systems for part of my living. So, I'm pretty good at getting things tweaked within an inch of their lives.

It took me about a month of tweaking to get this all working 100%, but I have several unique situations in my receive location that needed compensation to get all my stations solid.
 
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FTA4PA

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i bought a HDB91X antenna to pick up Chattanooga stations 60 miles away along with a Winegard LNA-200
amplifier suppose to be good for 70 miles but it will only pick 10 of my 30 stations my old cheap antenna would pick up 30 i have tried unplugging the amplifier made it even worse this is a high rated antenna any tips what may be wrong
if you have a hill/mountain between you and the towers try tilting the antenna up just a bit. Sometimes it will improve the signal. It's call the knife-edge effect. Worked for me! :)
 

primestar31

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Mar 15, 2005
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thanks I went ahead and did a exchange for the Channel Master CM-4221
Also be aware that the earth's HORIZON is right around 62~ or so miles away from you. That means that the Earth curves enough at that point, that any tv tower farther than that is below the horizon. That means there's NO direct path to your antenna, without bouncing off something. So, even if your house and the tower had nothing in-between you, receiving it solidly is still a bit of "black-magic", and you have to play around to find what works best for you. That could be a different antenna, tilting UP, tilting DOWN, raising it higher, lowering it lower, moving it to a different location on your property, any number of things!

Mile ratings on antennas are nothing but marketing HYPE, and mean nothing.

P.S. I just ran a Tvfool report based on your zip code of 30103, and it's HORRIBLE. Everything is 1 or 2edge listed at 30 feet. That means that ALL broadcasts have to bounce off of at least 1 thing (mountain or terrain) before getting to your property. That's bad, though just doing a generic zip code report isn't that good, and it really should be run on your exact house coordinates. Also, TVfool is tweaking their database, and it isn't as good as it used to be. I fall back on "you MUST try all sorts of things, and find what works best for YOU"

Here is that report:
TV Fool
 
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harshness

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May 5, 2007
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All of the Big Four Chattanooga stations are in the VHF-high range. WNGH will be moving to RF4.

Rather than two antennas, I'd suggest one full-range antenna since the big guns are on VHF.

Due to land features, Atlanta may (or may not) be easier and three of the Big Four are UHF.
 

Wireless Engineer

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Those long boom yagis are too directional so you MUST use a rotator and the slightest movement in the wind may cause signal drops and most of their gain is on higher frequencies no longer used.
A 4 bay bowtie antenna has a 60 degree pattern and a much greater capture area so it is always my first choice for UHF installs and they have better performance at lower uhf frequencies.
But if Chattanooga is your market, you also need a VHF antenna for certain since many are vhf and more are coming with the repack.
 
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harshness

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May 5, 2007
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I challenge your assertion that a bay antenna beats a Yagi-Uda at the low end. The Repack is eliminating the top half of what bay antennas were designed to do.
 
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andy_horton

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Dec 28, 2010
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Those long boom yagis are too directional so you MUST use a rotator and the slightest movement in the wind may cause signal drops and most of their gain is on higher frequencies no longer used.
A 4 bay bowtie antenna has a 60 degree pattern and a much greater capture area so it is always my first choice for UHF installs and they have better performance at lower uhf frequencies.
But if Chattanooga is your market, you also need a VHF antenna for certain since many are vhf and more are coming with the repack.
If not mistaken, WDEF will move from RF 12 to RF 8 as well. This may or may not make a difference. As for me currently, 1 4bay UHF only about 35-40 miles from towers in N GA with pre amp 15ft AGL no splits, about 50ft coax receives all but low power channels in the Chattanooga market. But it's taken frustration & determination to have a good locked reliable signal. Even when I tried several VHF/UHF combos, my UHF only works much better.
 

Wireless Engineer

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Higher gain doesn't mean more channels or better reception.
And if all your stations aren't coming in from the same exact direction at the same exact elevation, they can make signals worse.
Those long boom yagis are very directional so without a rotor you will likely be sacrificing signals in order to get others and the slightest movement in the wind will cause huge signal fluctuations.
4 bay bowties like the 4221 have a very wide pattern and a huge capture area compared to any yagi to they are much better at gathering off axis signals and usually produce more stable and predictable signals.
People tend to shop on published gain specs alone and since most are
either fake figures or greatly exaggerated, people wind up with buyers remorse.
What i have found in 40 years of antenna system design and installation is that it pays to stick with proven companies and designs.
And Winegard, Channel Master and Blonder Tongue are simply the oldest and most proven of companies and sell proven designs.
I have seen dozens of cases where i have replaced massive uhf yagis or massive vhf/uhf combo antennas with a 4 bay bowtie that out performed those long boom yagis.
 
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comfortably_numb

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Higher gain doesn't mean more channels or better reception.
And if all your stations aren't coming in from the same exact direction at the same exact elevation, they can make signals worse.
Those long boom yagis are very directional so without a rotor you will likely be sacrificing signals in order to get others and the slightest movement in the wind will cause huge signal fluctuations.
4 bay bowties like the 4221 have a very wide pattern and a huge capture area compared to any yagi to they are much better at gathering off axis signals and usually produce more stable and predictable signals.
People tend to shop on published gain specs alone and since most are
either fake figures or greatly exaggerated, people wind up with buyers remorse.
What i have found in 40 years of antenna system design and installation is that it pays to stick with proven companies and designs.
And Winegard, Channel Master and Blonder Tongue are simply the oldest and most proven of companies and sell proven designs.
I have seen dozens of cases where i have replaced massive uhf yagis or massive vhf/uhf combo antennas with a 4 bay bowtie that out performed those long boom yagis.
Which model 4-bay antennas do you recommend?
 
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navychop

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Here’s my two cents.

I moved my Channel Master 8 bay old style 4228 from being mounted on a ground level shed up 20’ to a mast on the top of our RV shelter. Didn’t help reception. Still get some pixelation.

I then reaimed that antenna, as it was off 30-40 degrees. Didn’t help much, if at all.

So these flat antennas certainly do have a wide reception angle.

I am only 4-5 miles from the antenna, broadcasting on RF 44, later to be 29. But there are numerous large trees between here and there.

Pick your poison.


Sent from my iPhone using SatelliteGuys App. For now.
 
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