New install: RG6/U or RG6/U Quad shielded? 110ft run

Discussion in 'The DISH Forum' started by Damn Dirty Ape, Apr 29, 2005.

  1. Damn Dirty Ape

    Damn Dirty Ape Thread Starter Member

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    HI all,

    We're getting a DVR625 w/ the DISH500 dish, but we will have to put it on a pole about 110ft from the receiver. The standard free install won't do the cable part, so I'm doing that.

    Question is: For the run, do I want RG6/U or RG6/U Quad shielded?

    I'm wondering just how much signal loss one vs. the other would show on a ballpark idea. I'm running two lines, so I'd get a 250ft spool of one them, one runs 39.99, and the other runs 69.99 (quad). I'd be putting connectors on the ends; it's bulk wire. Says made by Zenith on both of them (Lowes).

    That being said, is it honestly worth the price differential for that length of a run, the quad over the regular?

    Thank you for any help.
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  2. TYORK

    TYORK Active SatelliteGuys Member Supporting Founder

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    I would say no but are you sure that your wire is not cover in you install it is usally 125ft per run you may have to put the pole in and bury the cable but your cable should be covered. Depending i quess how you got your install from.

    t
  3. Damn Dirty Ape

    Damn Dirty Ape Thread Starter Member

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    Well, thinking about it I might want to double check, as the guy I talked to on the phone said they "would'nt get involved in any cable burying".. I'll have to check and see, but I bet if they supply the cable (and let me bury), it won't be quad shielded.. Been trying the search here and seems like things are evenly split between the quad and regular..

    thanks for the thought about them supplying it. :)
  4. Mike500

    Mike500 Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    In the early days of satellite and with Primestar, they used direct burial cable. It is a special cable that is filled with a gel that prevents the migration of water into the end or any cut or breach of the outer jacket. The best stuff also has a HDPE or high density polyethylene jacket that is imprevious to water and the acids present in tree or plant root tips.

    Almost no local install dealer or satellite company uses this stuff anymore. They choose only to bury regular coax. It will last the warranty period and a little longer. That's all they care about.

    I do high end installs. As far as I know; I am the only local installer who uses this high end cable.
  5. fishman

    fishman PIT MEMBER

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    The local dnsc offices here in NC use flooded orange dual cable with messenger, I dont know anyone else here who does that for a free install. That cable from lowes is crap, have your installer use his cable and bury it yourself, E* expects us to do pole mounts and 50ft of burial for free here, so I cant imagine it could be very different there. I would tell the company who told you they dony get involved in burying cable to shove it.
  6. Mike500

    Mike500 Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    All orange flooded cable is vinyl insulated. The black HDPE stuff is much more resistant to damage.
  7. mike_johnson

    mike_johnson Member

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    If you are burying it, you shouldn't need the quad shielded cable. The extra shielding is to help keep out interference. Burying does the same thing.

    Do yourself a favor and don't directly bury the cable (especially if it is not 'direct burial' cable). For minimal cost and a lot of work saved later get some black flexible PVC water pipe (1/2in or bigger) and bury it to run your cable in. It will help protect it, and make it really easy to run new cable or more cables in the future.

    I have 100ft run buried to my garage where my dishes are mounted. I started in '97 with a Dish 300, then came the Dish 500. Then locals on 148. Next will be the Dish 1000. If you don't like digging up your yard every few years, put in some pipe.
  8. Mike500

    Mike500 Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    Due to its moisture resistance and its long life, direct burial cable is highly recommended for any conduit application. Almost every conduit that I have serviced, that has been buried underground for some time, is filled with water. Water migrates inside from the humidity in the air. Direct burial cable is the best for all of these applications.

    I use the vinyl jacketed stuff in underground conduits and the HDPE stuff for direct burial in the soil. Many cable companies went to vinyl, because it can also be used inside the building, as it is UL listed to meet that purpose. The HDPE stuff is only allowed outside, or it is a code violation. It is, however, stiff and hard to put into conduit.

    Four cables is all that you'd ever need for both DirecTV or Dish for any current and future application.
  9. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon SatelliteGuys Family Supporting Founder

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    I also support using conduit for several reasons. Make it a lot bigger than you think you'll need - 1" or more. It doesn't cost that much more, and will make life easier.

    Don't forget to add pull strings when you push the cable so that you can pull more later if needed.

    Mike500:

    Your four cable statement is false. I'll agree that that is a "typical" maximum, but if you think it through, I know you can come up with various satellite/switch/receiver combinations that can require more feeds than that.

    It all just depends.

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