Eastern Arc vs Western Arc

Jim5506

Jim5506

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Just because the reflector is larger does not necessarily mean you will get more signal.

All of Dish Network's reflectors are basically designed to deliver a similar amount of signal to the associated lnb(s).

A single lnb D300, and dual lnb D500 and the triple lnb D1000X series all deliver a similar signal on any one lnb.

The D500 must be larger than the D300 to deliver the SAME signal because it is slightly out of focus in the horizontal plane to hit both lnbs.

The same principle applies to the D1000.X series.

The only way to insure you get more signal is to have a single focus reflector that is larger than your previous single focus reflector and be sure you place the lnb at the focal point of the new reflector - it should be further away from the dish so the edge of the reflector is not outside the peripheral vision of the lnb.
 
MikeD-C05

MikeD-C05

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For Rain Fade purposes the bigger dish is needed. The stronger and higher a signal the better chance the picture doesn't fade out in rain.
 
Jim5506

Jim5506

SatelliteGuys Master
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Lifetime Supporter
Oct 19, 2004
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Lubbock, Texas
AS we can see by the uplink failures recently from Wyoming, even a 30 ft dish cannot guarantee reception in a heavy thunderstorm.

My Dish install for 7 years was the first model Dish 1000, smaller than the 1000.2 and I averaged less than 2 times a year loss of signal due to rain fade and these occurrences rarely lasted more than 10 minutes.

The true secrete for me was having the dish nearly perfectly aligned and tweaked, I spent several hours after the initial install optimizing the signal for all three lnbs and got higher signal levels than the published norms, just by doing a proper job of alignment.

Most installations are "good enough" alignments that get you signals in the 50's or 60's, most of my TPs were in the upper 60's and 70's with this smaller, older dish.

If your cable co gets a heavy thunderstorm over its receiving dish, its signal will go out also, 99.9% of all TV distribution is via satellite and water absorbs microwave frequencies=RAIN FADE.

Sometimes there is just no way around it, but it is much cheaper to get a near perfect alignment than it is to buy larger dishes, and you might learn something.
 
whatchel1

whatchel1

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 30, 2006
9,099
48
Great High Plains
For Rain Fade purposes the bigger dish is needed. The stronger and higher a signal the better chance the picture doesn't fade out in rain.
Maybe so and maybe not. I use peaked .9 meter dishes but do still have rain fade. The SS is really a signal quality meter. I only get maybe a very small amt more SQ than the 1k4 dish. I have tested it. But my rain fade is less by a very small amount as the problem isn't the amount of signal coming in but the integrity of it. When rain comes down tween my dish and the sat there is a lot of dispersion that takes place. That right there will attenuate the signal and scatter it causing something akin to multipath issues. That will mess up the signal no matter how large the dish is.
 
whatchel1

whatchel1

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 30, 2006
9,099
48
Great High Plains
AS we can see by the uplink failures recently from Wyoming, even a 30 ft dish cannot guarantee reception in a heavy thunderstorm.

My Dish install for 7 years was the first model Dish 1000, smaller than the 1000.2 and I averaged less than 2 times a year loss of signal due to rain fade and these occurrences rarely lasted more than 10 minutes.

The true secrete for me was having the dish nearly perfectly aligned and tweaked, I spent several hours after the initial install optimizing the signal for all three lnbs and got higher signal levels than the published norms, just by doing a proper job of alignment.

Most installations are "good enough" alignments that get you signals in the 50's or 60's, most of my TPs were in the upper 60's and 70's with this smaller, older dish.

If your cable co gets a heavy thunderstorm over its receiving dish, its signal will go out also, 99.9% of all TV distribution is via satellite and water absorbs microwave frequencies=RAIN FADE.

Sometimes there is just no way around it, but it is much cheaper to get a near perfect alignment than it is to buy larger dishes, and you might learn something.
If the cable co is using C-band to receive the cable programming then it is very unlikely that it will go out in anything less than a major squall. The freq of C-band is just so much bigger than rain drops. But Dish uses DBS Ku band and that is almost the same size as rain drops. Directv is using both Ku and Ka and they have the same problems. Also the Ka is a much higher frequency and rain eats that faster than Ku. So it goes out faster and stays out a little longer. But not enuff to cause them to be taken down but only a tiny bit more.
 
whatchel1

whatchel1

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 30, 2006
9,099
48
Great High Plains
AS we can see by the uplink failures recently from Wyoming, even a 30 ft dish cannot guarantee reception in a heavy thunderstorm.

My Dish install for 7 years was the first model Dish 1000, smaller than the 1000.2 and I averaged less than 2 times a year loss of signal due to rain fade and these occurrences rarely lasted more than 10 minutes.

The true secrete for me was having the dish nearly perfectly aligned and tweaked, I spent several hours after the initial install optimizing the signal for all three lnbs and got higher signal levels than the published norms, just by doing a proper job of alignment.

Most installations are "good enough" alignments that get you signals in the 50's or 60's, most of my TPs were in the upper 60's and 70's with this smaller, older dish.

If your cable co gets a heavy thunderstorm over its receiving dish, its signal will go out also, 99.9% of all TV distribution is via satellite and water absorbs microwave frequencies=RAIN FADE.

Sometimes there is just no way around it, but it is much cheaper to get a near perfect alignment than it is to buy larger dishes, and you might learn something.
If the cable co is using C-band to receive the cable programming then it is very unlikely that it will go out in anything less than a major squall. The freq of C-band is just so much bigger than rain drops. But Dish uses DBS Ku band and that is almost the same size as rain drops. Directv is using both Ku and Ka and they have the same problems. Also the Ka is a much higher frequency and rain eats that faster than Ku. So it goes out faster and stays out a little longer. But not enuff to cause them to be taken down but only a tiny bit more. I do love when cable runs the ads about how terrible satellite is when they get over 90% of their programming that way too.
 

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