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Connecting dish to existing cable.

Discussion in 'The FTA Shack' started by angelis75, Feb 28, 2009.

  1. angelis75

    angelis75 Thread Starter New Member

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    Hi
    I recently installed an 85cm Fortec Star dish with an SG2100 motor. I currently have the RG6 cable from the motor running through my kitchen door, squashing the cable until I figure a better way to get the cable into the house. Is it possible to use my cable company's outdoor connection to feed my dish signal into the rooms. I have discontinued my cable TV but still use the broadband internet service. I have thought of using a slitter to couple the cable and satellite signal into the cable that runs in the house. Im reluctant to try for a few reasons.
    1. The receiver sends out some voltage to feed the motor. Maybe this would blow my cable modem.
    2. I already have 100 feet of RG6 cable coming from the motor. The added house cable could lower the signal. Of course I could reduce it by 20-30 feet if needed.
    3. The internet and satellite signal might not be compatible.
    4. Would the cable company allow this?


    Has anyone tried this in a similar situation?

    Thanks for any advice.

    Chris
     
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  2. glen4cindy

    glen4cindy Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    Sorry, but, the CATV co's cable cannot share with your dish.

    You will need to run a 2nd cable into your house.

    They do make flat "under window" cables that are like 4 inches that allow you to put the cable in thru a window and then close the window, but, that would be a last resort.

    Better thing is to drill a 2nd hole near where the CATV comes in because there should be a ground there where you can get a ground block and ground your dish cable before it comes into your house.
     
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  3. angelis75

    angelis75 Thread Starter New Member

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    Thanks for your advice. I was unaware of the flat RG6 and it sounds tempting but I will see if I can pass the coax through the attic. I have already grounded the dish (not the cable) to an outdoor faucet (about 10 feet away). Does the cable also need grounding. I do not have the RG6 with ground wire so I just attached a point on the dish to the faucet using a grounding bracket and 10 gauge wire.

    Chris
     
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  4. Iceberg

    Iceberg We're here....RUN!!!! Supporting Founder

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    actually if there was no splitters in the line it would work with a diplexer

    antenna & cable (CATV) run at lower frequencies than satellite
     
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  5. glen4cindy

    glen4cindy Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    When you ground the coax, you don't need the coax with messenger wire, the ground block actually grounds the shield of the coax.
     
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  6. glen4cindy

    glen4cindy Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    What concerned me about him trying to use a diplexer was his internet service.

    Would the diplexer interfere with the two-way operation of the cable modem?

    I was just saying that based upon my previous experience as a cable internet installer. Some consumer installed devices on the same cable line often caused problems with the transmission of the cable modem signals necessary for internet use. Just trying to be safe! :)
     
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  7. wescopc

    wescopc Senior Member Pub Member / Supporter

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    Glen4cindy - What frequency does the CATV company use for internet?
    Bob
     
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  8. Anole

    Anole SatelliteGuys Guru

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    Whether the cable and FTA can be combined under any circumstance shouldn't be the question.
    It might be possible, but I guarantee you the first time you have trouble with your cable, and call them out, they'll rip out your attachments.
    AS THEY SHOULD. - :eek:
     
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  9. Iceberg

    Iceberg We're here....RUN!!!! Supporting Founder

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    If I remember correctly, somewhere around 30mhz....below VHF low
     
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  10. glen4cindy

    glen4cindy Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    The uplink frequency is in the 30 MHz range, and the downstream frequency is usually around 800-900 something MHz, depending upon the system.

    Some systems have more than 1 provider as well.
     
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  11. jgabriels

    jgabriels Member

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    I would be more worried about the voltages. Wouldn't
    having the 18v running down the line cause problems
    for the cable company? Also, you are powering the motor.
    How does the motor handle running through a diplexer?

    If it were all passive, I would just say try it and see what happens,
    but with the voltages there is a small possibility that trying it
    could break something.
     
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  12. angelis75

    angelis75 Thread Starter New Member

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    Yes I am powering the motor to get from 83 W all the way to 123 W. That was my concern also. But it seems it might be safer to have a separate cable. Thanks for all the suggestions and advice. I was not aware of flat RG6 cable or diplexers but now I am. I thought this might be something that was done regularly by people and maybe without the internet complexity it is. If I feel brave down the road I might try it and update everyone.
     
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  13. DishDigger

    DishDigger Member Pub Member / Supporter

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    I hope I'm not too late getting into this, but I read where you grounded your system to a water hydrant.:confused: This is NOT a good practice (especially if you have PVC piping ???). Metal piping doesn't make a good conductor to ground as corrosion can build up over the years and insulate the protection you're trying to obtain. You really should get a copper ground rod 8-10 feet long and drive it straight down in the earth, then attach your ground wire to that.:up
     
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  14. glen4cindy

    glen4cindy Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    I thought about this, but, it seems that he had enough to think about without me adding something about improper grounding. :)
     
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  15. SatPhreak

    SatPhreak Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    The flat coax cables that can go through a window or door are good. I have been using one for about 2 years without any problems with a motorized dish. It allows the window to be shut to keep out the cold winter air that I experience here. They are fairly cheap - less than $5 and no holes drilled into the apartment walls.

    The dish should be grounded to the house electrical ground round by code.
     
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  16. jgabriels

    jgabriels Member

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  17. JosephB

    JosephB Active SatelliteGuys Member

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    That one should work. Just be sure the power passing side(s) are used for the dish and receiver and the NON-power passing sides are used for the cable modem.
     
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  18. angelis75

    angelis75 Thread Starter New Member

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    Thanks jgabriels. I might give that a shot. I did already order some flat cable though :)
    Im not sure if I understand the power passing. Does this mean that the non-power passing side will not transfer the current from the receiver to my cable modem, if I connect it as JosephB suggested? Likewise for the diplexer outside, If I connect the non-power passing side to the cable company's cable, no current should go to that cable but only to the motor?

    Thanks
     
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  19. badhat

    badhat Member

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    There is a great schematic somewhere here on the forums where someone explained this type of setup.. if I find it I will post the link. The power passing side of the diplexer will allow the voltage from your receiver to reach the LNB at the dish. The non power passing side is what you would use for the cable input to the cable modem. If you were to hook up your receiver to the non power passing side nothing would happen since it doesn't pass power... it won't burn up your receiver or your local cable system. Cable systems are protected from power insertion, through the cable, into the tap and cable system from the house. Don't get me wrong there are things that can wreak havoc on a cable system from a house but I won't give cable haters any fuel for that fire. :)
     
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