622 Diplexed twice?

sfollenius

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
I had my 622 installed a few weeks ago. The install was interesting to me. It appears the main signal comes in from the Dish 1000 then to the main outlet in my living room then diplexed the output of tv2 to the same wire as the oncoming signal. How does this work, I thought the diplexors split frequencies. Does tv2 use a different frequency than the satellite signal?
 

RandallA

Supporting Founder
Supporting Founder
Dec 13, 2004
10,556
68
San Francisco Bay Area
"How does this work, I thought the diplexors split frequencies. Does tv2 use a different frequency than the satellite signal?"

Diplexers combine signals and they work in pairs. The TV2 signal is in the lower frequencies and the satellite signal is in the higher frequencies.
 

Van

SatelliteGuys Master
Jul 8, 2004
9,325
9
Virginia Beach
Diplexors basicly turn a coax wich is normaly a one way path into a pathway allowing for 2 diferent signal types to travel on the same path without "colliding" with each other, it also allows for the diferent signals to travel in oposite directions.

Think of a one way street and theres a tractor trailer traveling down it followed by and preceeded by other like vehicles with only an inch of space between them. Your in a station waggon with the little nuclear family unit trying to get on this road to start your summer vacation to wally world. You would think that you cant get on but you push the diplexor mode button on the dash and your family truckster phases slightly out of the world and you easily slip into the road in the same spot that the truck is in and both vehicles travel safely down the road without harming each other, the same diplexor button will allow you to travel in the wrong direction down this road without anyone getting hurt.
 

webbydude

SatelliteGuys Master
Feb 6, 2005
5,339
1
Akron, Ohio, United States
Van said:
Diplexors basicly turn a coax wich is normaly a one way path into a pathway allowing for 2 diferent signal types to travel on the same path without "colliding" with each other, it also allows for the diferent signals to travel in oposite directions.

Think of a one way street and theres a tractor trailer traveling down it followed by and preceeded by other like vehicles with only an inch of space between them. Your in a station waggon with the little nuclear family unit trying to get on this road to start your summer vacation to wally world. You would think that you cant get on but you push the diplexor mode button on the dash and your family truckster phases slightly out of the world and you easily slip into the road in the same spot that the truck is in and both vehicles travel safely down the road without harming each other, the same diplexor button will allow you to travel in the wrong direction down this road without anyone getting hurt.

Too funny! That's almost the EXACT example I use whenever I have a customer ask me about "...those splitter looking thingies..."
 

Van

SatelliteGuys Master
Jul 8, 2004
9,325
9
Virginia Beach
Haha thanks weby, I've had to dumb it down even more than that for a few techs to understand over the last 2 years, I think it comes down to a persons ability to visualize in their head wich is why some techs have a hard time with installing a system on a house because they cant see the home in 4 demensions after walking through and then standing outside looking at it.
 

Mike500

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 7, 2003
1,338
0
Thiepval
Diplexors allow propagation of signals on the same conductor on the basis that the signals are on different frequencies. This is the same for both DirecTV and for Dish.



A multiplexor is a device that places more than one frequency spectrum on one line or one signal.

A triplexor places three frequency spectra on one line or one transmitted signal.

A diplexor is a device that places two frequencies in one line.

The so called "combiner" used by DirecTV is a diplexor. The sat c lnb has a lower frequency than the sat b lnb.

A multiswitch with only a sat b lnb f1xed to the tone input port will see and translate sat b transponders.

A multiswitch with ony a sat c lnb f1xed to the tone input port will see and translate sat c transponders.

With both the sat b and sat c signals sent to the cable with the combiner (which is electronically a diplexor), the 22 Khz port sees both the sat b and sat c transponders.

Another type of diplexor called a combiner is a common TV VHF/UHF combiner allowing the placement of two separate differing frequency spectra on one cable.

The most common diplexor to us are the ones combining analog cable/broadcast bands with lnb signals on one cable.

A signal stacker technically has a built in diplexor as does a destacker. It also includes frequency conversion equipment. DishPro technology uses diplexors and stacker/destackers.

In all cases, none of these combiners or diplexors translate the signal. That is done by the multiswitch or the conversion sections of the ird, stacker/destacker or that section built in to the tv receiver. Early tv's did not have this ability. There were separate input feeds for both VHF and UHF. If the VHF and UHF signals were "combined" or diplexed at the antenna, a second diplexor called a "separator" was needed at the TV set.
 

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