DirecTV Now to rebrand under AT&T TV family.

goaliebob99

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There was nothing stopping them from doing MPEG4 prior to T16. What it brings is the ability to reach Puerto Rico (so they can retire 110) and Hawaii at full power (so they can use a Slimline instead of the AK/HI dish) and use the 6 transponders currently used for spot beams from 101 for CONUS broadcast.

MPEG4 is just a different way of organizing bits than MPEG2, the satellite transponders don't know or care whether the bits modulated into a RF waveform contain MPEG2, MPEG4 or chocolate chip cookie recipes in Welsh.

My understanding was it was a modulation issue on how they wanted the transponders configured versus an actual MPEG4 issue, they wanted to use S2 to squeeze more bandwidth out from the transponders in the combination of MP4 instead of DVBS and couldn't with the old bird as those modes were not supported on T8. But I could be wrong as this was 2nd hand info.

I believe it's a significant increase in bandwidth going from DVBS to S2 on KU, which would give them more capacity aside from the additional gains they would get from the encoding change as well.
 

slice1900

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My understanding was it was a modulation issue on how they wanted the transponders configured versus an actual MPEG4 issue, they wanted to use S2 to squeeze more bandwidth out from the transponders in the combination of MP4 instead of DVBS and couldn't with the old bird as those modes were not supported on T8. But I could be wrong as this was 2nd hand info.

I believe it's a significant increase in bandwidth going from DVBS to S2 on KU, which would give them more capacity aside from the additional gains they would get from the encoding change as well.

DSS vs DVB-S2 is just a different organization of bits, the satellite doesn't know or care which is being used. Directv uses QPSK 6/7 on DSS, and use QPSK 3/4 on DVB-S2 which is actually LESS bit efficient. They get 34.1 Mbps out of their 24 MHz wide (20 MHz actually used) Ku transponders vs 39.4 Mbps out of their 36 MHz wide (30 MHz actually used) Ka transponders.

Directv has been using a single DVB-S2 transponder on D7S at 119 for years, carrying MPEG4 HD programming. So it is pretty obvious it works on the "older" satellites.
 

slice1900

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If they wanted to call the new streaming product AT&T TV to avoid confusion with Directv so customers would know the new product doesn't need satellite, changing the name of Directv's satellite product to something with AT&T in it would kind of defeat the purpose...
 

Juan

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Not if you plan on transitioning customers from satellite to ip
If they wanted to call the new streaming product AT&T TV to avoid confusion with Directv so customers would know the new product doesn't need satellite, changing the name of Directv's satellite product to something with AT&T in it would kind of defeat the purpose...

Sent from my SM-G950U using the SatelliteGuys app!
 

slice1900

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Not if you plan on transitioning customers from satellite to ip


It is pretty obvious that's not the plan, or they wouldn't have just launched a new satellite two months ago. The existing satellites at 101 have more than enough life left if the plan was to transition customers over the next several years.
 

Willh699

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May 20, 2009
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DTV also rebranding? Their twitter account hints at a name change?

DIRECTV: Will AT&T Change the Name? - The TV Answer Man!
i saw that story, most likely, AT&T isn't rebranding, just trying to create a new consolidated AT&T TV service/customer support Twitter account to cover the new AT&T TV streaming service, AT&T Now (formerly DirecTV Now), U-Verse, AT&T Watch TV, and DirecTV.
 

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