Fair Play Law

Discussion in 'Local Radio Discussion' started by Brian1430, Jun 10, 2016.

  1. Brian1430

    Brian1430 Topic Starter Member
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  2. jegrant

    jegrant SatelliteGuys Pro

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    Wow, so some in Congress want to shut down even more music stations? And make it almost impossible for anyone to start new music stations? If anything, they need to reform the law by lowering the outrageous music licensing and rights costs, particularly those imposed on small businesses. If this passes, you'll see more talk radio stations.
     
  3. radio

    radio "On the Air" in MI
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    May come as a surprise, but even talk stations get licenses for their music BEDS, even if not commercial music! If it's by a licensed artist, they pay a "blanket fee" too.
     
  4. jegrant

    jegrant SatelliteGuys Pro

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    Oh, I know that any music at all has to be licensed in most cases, but it's still going to cost a lot less to license a few music beds, than if you are licensing 15-20 songs an hour.
     
  5. radio

    radio "On the Air" in MI
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    The music industry has become the GREEDIEST in our time...they sock different rates on different stations, AND they go by market size AND they get to look at your yearly books...so, if a reasonably large market station does talk-format, they'll pay as much for beds of music as we do for 24/7. Sad, isn't it? Leaches. All of them. The easiest to deal-with from a terrestrial broadcasters' standpoint is Soundexchange, and that's only because so far they've been polite and helpful with our licensing. They handle broadcasters' streaming rights, but we still have to pay additional to 2 of the 3 biggies to provide a stream. . This year THOSE rules changed, prompting many streamers to go silent. We had to have new software WRITTEN and change HOW we report, just to stay on the web...but the service is necessary to remain competitive in today's environment. I agree with your statement in it's "basics" but, market against market, it's not going to mean less for large talk stations, vs. our bill which is around 8 grand a year now. It's market size and income based.....

    The 3 biggies are so awful that if they call your station, it doesn't come from "BMI" or ASCAP or SESAC on caller ID, it's a damn 800 number....translation by me: We're ashamed to show up when we call you about something. We have all toll free numbers blocked for telemarketing. Really teed them off...but, if they want to talk, I think they should call from a NAMED number. Usually the call is for something like, "We need to know your GROSS receipts for the year"...not our NET after expenses, they bill our rate for music on GROSS. ...which....truly is.
     
    FTA4PA and jegrant like this.
  6. richyrich

    richyrich SatelliteGuys Pro

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    Kind of interesting is that the Artist's only get known, popular, and sell cd's/song's only if they can get some form of publicity or play locally; and nationaly; but do not want any ads to pay for free publicity...
     
  7. jegrant

    jegrant SatelliteGuys Pro

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    This is the thing - radio airplay has traditionally been a great free advertising method for artists that has helped them sell records, sell concert tickets, merchandise, etc. and they want to charge radio stations for the privilege of promoting the artists' product.
     

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