Help aligning DISH 500 to get 129

R

rebel4ever

Thread Starter
Member
May 15, 2008
5
0
Hello-

I have been searching for information on how to align a separate DISH 500 with a dual Pro head to get the 129 sat. I have found bits and pieces but I have a couple of questions- There are so many people on this forum with so much knowledge - I would definitely appreciate any help!

I live in North GA zip 30582. I have a 1000.2 and have a hard time keeping a decent signal on the 129 sat. I would like to try a separate 500 to see if I can get a better signal. My questions are:

- Do I leave the 500 skew the same as when I was receiving 110/119 or do I turn it to 90 and not use the skew when I go for the 129? I read that the 129 is about 5 degrees lower and about 10 degrees to the right (from the rear) of the 110/119 position but I didn't know what to do with the skew.

- Using the DP dual - Should I use the 119 output when trying to get the 129?

- What would the correct elevation for my location?

- Assuming I get a decent signal on the 500. I can then run the signal to the LNB input on my 1000.2 triple head. I assume I need to cover the 129 head on the 1000.2 with foil so it will not confuse the system?

- I also have a single DP LNB head and mast adapter. Would it be better/easier to use a single LNB head or the dual LNB head on the 500 DISH. Both are DISH PRO.

- Is it true that the 129 is a failing satellite? How can DISH rely on something like that for the HD channels? When will it be replaced? Will it still be at 129 location or somewhere else?

Thanks in advance for any help!!!
 
G

garys

SatelliteGuys Master
Shouldn't matter if you use 119 or 110 as only a slight adjustment would be needed, skew does need to be set at 90. Existing skew changes the angle. 129 is not a failing sat, it is just harder to allign a dish for 3 sat locations and get acceptable signal strengths on all three.
 
R

rebel4ever

Thread Starter
Member
May 15, 2008
5
0
Thanks for the quick reply!!

I will try the 500 with the dual head and see what I get. One more thing I don't understand is even with the best alignment the 129 signal is not as strong the 110/119. Why is this true? I read in a post that they don't transmit with as much power?? I could understand that adjusting a multi DISH trying to optimize thre satellites at once can be hard - but even using a separate DISH I have never heard of anyone getting a signal as strong as the 110/119.

Thanks!!
 
harshness

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
17,345
3,220
Salem, OR
The Dish500 "head" (LNBF) is not a dual, it is a twin. It is important that you not try to reinvent the nomenclature.

Skew doesn't matter as you'll be using the 110W feed horn to pick up 129W. All that counts is that you get the elevation (27.7 degrees) correct and the mast plumb.

Using a second dish with a Dish 1000.2 is likely to be problematic. The LNB port was designed for use with a slot other than 110W, 119W or 129W. I'd suggest two Dish500 dishes after you've established that your Dish 1000.2 is aligned as well as it can be.

If you have three receivers, you'll may need an external DPP44 switch.


Know that not too far down the road, you'll probably need an entirely different setup as they'll move all of your services to a new set of satellites.
 
R

rebel4ever

Thread Starter
Member
May 15, 2008
5
0
Thanks again for the insight - here are my comments-

- Sorry about the wrong nomenclature - the DISH 500 head is a twin.

- So the skew doesn't matter at all?? OK I will start with it at 90 and set the elevation to 27.7.

- I knew the additional LNB port was meant for another satellite other than the 129 - that is why I mentioned putting the foil over the 129 LNB on the triple head so it would not get confused seeing 129 from two different LNB's. Would that resolve any confusion? I had seen others do this in the forums.

- DISH is going to change all of their satellites!?!?!?!? :eek: WHEN?? Will they be at the same locations or new ones?

- I realize that getting more signal strength will not result in a better picture - it is digital. However a stronger signal will mean less dropouts due to weather and less times when it has to search to find the 129 satellite. My point on this issue is that I have never seen anyone get a signal on 129 equal to the 110/119 signal - even with a separate DISH (although I am going to try). So something must be different. Either the signal is weaker from the satellite? or the way the receiver processes it? or something... Two local DISH installers said you cannot get over 40-50 on the 129 no matter what you do. It is strange to me that the latest and greatest HD service would be on the weakest link? My 2 cents...

Thanks again!!:up
 
vegassatellite

vegassatellite

SatelliteGuys Pro
Pub Member / Supporter
Nov 5, 2007
3,319
174
Phoenix, AZ
Echostar V at 129 is a failing bird. Less than a year left to live. The solar arrays are failing and that means the power output of the transponders is diminished. DISH can do two things about this: Shut off some transponders and run a stronger signal, or keep transponder running, but at reduced power.


EchoStar V
Summary: The satellite was originally designed with a minimum 12-year design life. Momentum wheel failures in prior years, together with relocation of the satellite between orbital locations, resulted in increased fuel consumption. These issues have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite, but have reduced the remaining spacecraft life to less than two years as of 30 June 2007.
Momentum wheels: In July 2001, EchoStar V experienced the loss of one of its three momentum wheels. Two momentum wheels are utilized during normal operations and a spare wheel was switched in at the time. A second momentum wheel experienced an anomaly in December 2003 and was switched out resulting in operation of the spacecraft in a modified mode utilizing thrusters to maintain spacecraft pointing. While this operating mode provides adequate performance, it results in an increase in fuel usage and a corresponding reduction of spacecraft life.
Thrusters: During August 2001, one of the thrusters on EchoStar V experienced an anomalous event resulting in a temporary interruption of service. The satellite was quickly restored to normal operations mode. The satellite is equipped with "a substantial number" of backup thrusters.
TWTAs: Unlike almost every other satellite operator, EchoStar even gives details about the health of its satellites' travelling-wave-tube amplifiers (TWTAs). Until 30 June 2001, two of them had to be replaced with spares. During the third quarter 2001, another TWTA "experienced unusually high telemetry readings and as a precaution, during September 2001 EchoStar substituted that TWTA with a spare."
EchoStar V is equipped with 48 TWTAs, including 16 spares.
Solar arrays: The satellite has a total of approximately 96 solar array strings. Prior to 2007, EchoStar V experienced anomalies resulting in the loss of seven solar array strings. In June 2007, the satellite lost an additional solar array string. The solar array anomalies have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite until mid-2007. Since the satellite only has a remaining life of less than two years, the solar array failures (which would normally have resulted in a reduction in the number of transponders to which power can be provided in later years), are not expected to reduce the current remaining life of the satellite.
Telemetry: During January 2003, EchoStar V experienced an anomaly in a spacecraft electronic component which affects the ability to receive telemetry from certain on-board equipment. Other methods of communication have been established to alleviate the effects of the failed component.
EchoStar SEC Filings
 
daro

daro

SatelliteGuys Guru
Apr 12, 2007
143
0
She still works well for me . I usually can bring in around 65 with a 1.k2 on TP 16(modified)... maybe 90% of the time... but yea it is a piece o crap and I had hell trying to find the sweet spot when it came out.

If you do what your talking about you should be able to bring in a good signal.
I had my 1000+ at home and could only get about 65 out of 129(modified) ...........moved 129 to a 500 with a dp dual and can get around 75 (modified)......pretty much if you dedicate a dish to a single orbital location ..your results will be much better.
 
R

rebel4ever

Thread Starter
Member
May 15, 2008
5
0
Thanks again for the info!

- Looks like 129 is having some issues of its own and doesn't have much life left.

I found another thread on this forum that was discussing what will be happening next - looks like they will go ahead and move everything to 61.5. I wish I would have known this before I bought 3 1000.2 dishes and triple heads for my three locations. If you have to get 110,119 and 61.5 for all channels - I guess there won't be any single dish solutions? :confused:

I am going to try to get the 61.5 satellite and see what kind of signal I can get while I am out there
 

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