Info for techs using the 129 (1 Viewer)

Sat Monkey

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
May 25, 2008
99
0
Wausau, WI
This might answer some questions for those of you using the 129 and seeing signals go up and down every 45 min or so.

I recently learned at Dish Network Team Summit in Nashville TN. that the 129 is broken for lack of a better term.

It is not able to hold its attitude in space and falls out of adjustment, so Dish net is having to fire thrusters every 45 min or so to bring it back into its correct attitude.

This would account for the up and down signals techs have been seeing while pointing up on it.

Dish plans to replace it in the near future, when I dont know, but lets hope its soon.

Just a bit of info for y'all to chew on.

Mike(The Sat Monkey)
 

hendrix04

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 16, 2008
601
0
ceil-2 is launching in like the dec - feb time frame, which will replace the 129 bird. So pretty much expect it to be may 09 before it is operational.
 

vegassatellite

SatelliteGuys Pro
Pub Member / Supporter
Nov 5, 2007
3,319
174
Phoenix, AZ
ceil-2 is launching in like the dec - feb time frame, which will replace the 129 bird. So pretty much expect it to be may 09 before it is operational.

I'm seeing some information that the launch was pushed back to 1st quarter 2009. Probably concerned about the Briz-M second stage booster.
 

vegassatellite

SatelliteGuys Pro
Pub Member / Supporter
Nov 5, 2007
3,319
174
Phoenix, AZ
Here's the full report on Echostar V, currently at 129

EchoStar V

Summary: The satellite was originally designed with a minimum 12-year design life. Momentum wheel failures in prior years, together with relocation of the satellite between orbital locations, resulted in increased fuel consumption. These issues have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite, but have reduced the remaining spacecraft life to less than two years as of 30 June 2007.
Momentum wheels: In July 2001, EchoStar V experienced the loss of one of its three momentum wheels. Two momentum wheels are utilized during normal operations and a spare wheel was switched in at the time. A second momentum wheel experienced an anomaly in December 2003 and was switched out resulting in operation of the spacecraft in a modified mode utilizing thrusters to maintain spacecraft pointing. While this operating mode provides adequate performance, it results in an increase in fuel usage and a corresponding reduction of spacecraft life.
Thrusters: During August 2001, one of the thrusters on EchoStar V experienced an anomalous event resulting in a temporary interruption of service. The satellite was quickly restored to normal operations mode. The satellite is equipped with "a substantial number" of backup thrusters.
TWTAs: Unlike almost every other satellite operator, EchoStar even gives details about the health of its satellites' travelling-wave-tube amplifiers (TWTAs). Until 30 June 2001, two of them had to be replaced with spares. During the third quarter 2001, another TWTA "experienced unusually high telemetry readings and as a precaution, during September 2001 EchoStar substituted that TWTA with a spare."
EchoStar V is equipped with 48 TWTAs, including 16 spares.
Solar arrays: The satellite has a total of approximately 96 solar array strings. Prior to 2007, EchoStar V experienced anomalies resulting in the loss of seven solar array strings. In June 2007, the satellite lost an additional solar array string. The solar array anomalies have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite until mid-2007. Since the satellite only has a remaining life of less than two years, the solar array failures (which would normally have resulted in a reduction in the number of transponders to which power can be provided in later years), are not expected to reduce the current remaining life of the satellite.
Telemetry: During January 2003, EchoStar V experienced an anomaly in a spacecraft electronic component which affects the ability to receive telemetry from certain on-board equipment. Other methods of communication have been established to alleviate the effects of the failed component.
EchoStar SEC Filings
Last modified: 12 August 2007
 

Stargazer

Supporting Founder
Supporting Founder
Sep 7, 2003
16,561
338
Western WV
It states :

In June 2007, the satellite lost an additional solar array string. The solar array anomalies have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite until mid-2007. Since the satellite only has a remaining life of less than two years

-------

This means that they have not even until June of 2009 to have a satellite launched in operation otherwise we will lose our channels on 129. If this happens they are going to lose a LOT of subscribers to DirecTv just for the fact that they have local channels in some markets on this satellite. Perhaps they should get those markets up in MPEG-4 HD FIRST that are on 129 so that they do not lose those subscribers if that is the case. If the subscribers do not want HD then they will have all the hardware capable of it and still be able to receiving their programming in SD.
 

vegassatellite

SatelliteGuys Pro
Pub Member / Supporter
Nov 5, 2007
3,319
174
Phoenix, AZ
It states :

In June 2007, the satellite lost an additional solar array string. The solar array anomalies have not impacted commercial operation of the satellite until mid-2007. Since the satellite only has a remaining life of less than two years

-------

This means that they have not even until June of 2009 to have a satellite launched in operation otherwise we will lose our channels on 129. If this happens they are going to lose a LOT of subscribers to DirecTv just for the fact that they have local channels in some markets on this satellite. Perhaps they should get those markets up in MPEG-4 HD FIRST that are on 129 so that they do not lose those subscribers if that is the case. If the subscribers do not want HD then they will have all the hardware capable of it and still be able to receiving their programming in SD.

There is often a difference in expected life estimates and actual life. Dish expects the satellite to be replaced before it has to be moved to graveyard orbit. They are probably getting better fuel economy than they anticipated. Solar arrays aren't what's keeping the bird in place, they just provide the output power to the transponders. So, if the solar arrays go out, the available power to drive the signal is diminished. This is why the satellite doesn't have as strong a signal. It's like trying to drive a 1000 watt stereo with a very wimpy car battery.

If all else, there appears to be a lot of room on 118.7 so there's some options to move content there if 129 or even 61.5's Echostar 3 were to fail completely. It looks like 3 unused transponders and several under-utilized transponders.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top