Installing in-line signal amp (1 Viewer)

Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!

jvmcdowe

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Apr 27, 2006
39
0
Obviously the part with the AC plug gets plugged into the wall and then screwed into the satellite in spot, then cable line in to that. My question is the other piece. Does it attach directly to my LNB, or at a break in my cable run? Also, I want to run this on my line that is picking up 110. Is 110 normally on the left or right while looking at the dish? Thanks for the help.
 
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!

boba

SatelliteGuys Master
Dec 12, 2003
11,350
1,033
Dorchester, TX.
jvmcdowe said:
Obviously the part with the AC plug gets plugged into the wall and then screwed into the satellite in spot, then cable line in to that. My question is the other piece. Does it attach directly to my LNB, or at a break in my cable run? Also, I want to run this on my line that is picking up 110. Is 110 normally on the left or right while looking at the dish? Thanks for the help.
Why do you think you need a signal amplifier? For DISH Network the amplifier would need a rating of at least 950-2150.:)
 

jvmcdowe

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Apr 27, 2006
39
0
Thanks. I heard (from bad sorce obviously) that it would give me a little boost. I have been getting constant 40 strength on my locals (very edge of fringe area) and when night comes, they go in and out every 10 seconds or so. I thought it might give it a little boost to maintain through the night.
 

avediswolf

I'm Back!
Lifetime Supporter
Apr 22, 2005
453
15
Columbus, Ohio
They do make amplifiers for Satellite, and they have no wires, they use the DC current supplied by the receiver, and cost about 20 - 30 bucks. Just look for a satellite inline amplifier.

But, I'm not sure how much that will really help, they are usually used when having really long runs of cable, and help from one on a shorter cable run is questionable.

What it sounds like, you probably are getting locals from 129 degrees. You have a dish 1000 antenna?

Sounds like you may need to peak it a little better, or move to a 2 dish solution as others have posted.
 

jvmcdowe

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Apr 27, 2006
39
0
Yeah, I do have a long cable run with two connection spots. The package reads "In-line signal amplifier for satellite dish" The numbers on it say 15-1170 then under that reads 50-2200.
 

RandallA

Supporting Founder
Supporting Founder
Dec 13, 2004
10,555
67
San Francisco Bay Area
You need to use the one that Bhelms is suggesting. You can place it somewhere in the middle, don't put it close to the LNB. You can also place it at the receiver. How long are the cable runs? These in-line amplifiers will not work at runs under 150-200 ft.

I love this quote at the Radio Shack site:

"The 13dB gain helps increase audio volume." WTF?

and I forgot to say that the in-line amp will not help you at all. You need to repeak the dish, 40 is way too low. Just remember, garbage in - garbage out.
 
Last edited:

bhelms

"Wannabe Retiree"
Lifetime Supporter
Feb 26, 2006
7,788
844
Central PA
In general you want any amp as close to the source as possible to amplify the signals and not any noise picked-up in the down lead. In the case of digital signals and receivers the noise part probably won't make any difference unless it's a strong component. But in this instance I think closer to the receiver is best (see below).

I am familiar with the 15-1170 used as an in-line amp for lower frequencies like VHF/UHF TV. In that case it is usually a stand-alone component meaning that it needs both the amp and the power insertor because the cable has no other power. I am not familiar with its application in a sat downlead that already had power for the LNBs. There are two questions to be answered - will it be correctly powered by the receiver/switch LNB power, and will it pass that same power on to the LNBs that still need it?

In your case I'd install just the amp part in the cable where it's convenient to get to it just to try it out. You'll need to wait for the system to reacquire the signal and if it can't that would be a good indication that this set-up won't work. I would NOT in any case install or power the insertor - there may be a conflict with the power the receiver/switch provides.

The other unit I linked to is specifically made for your application...
 
Last edited:
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!

MikeD-C05

Pub Member / Supporter
Pub Member / Supporter
Nov 25, 2003
26,220
16,180
Nederland , Texas
I was the one that tried the experiment with the rca inline amplifier. It didn't make any real difference in the end. I am not far enough away from the dish to get any boost . They are used for long coax installs of say 80 or 100 feet away from the dish. I tested it with the amplifier and again without it a day or two later and the signal stayed about the same.

The 129 sat is a wobbely satellite that increases in strength and then goes down. I am keeping my dish 1000 installed just for the 129 sat and I get signals in the mid 70s to low to high 80s and some 90s on most of my transponders. It changes in strengths depending on what time of day you test it.

My elevation and skew is different than what the directions say for a dish 1000 as I peaked it on the 129 sat instead of the 119, like it said. I used a satellite meter to peak it and ran it into my dish 500 which is peaked for the 110/119 sats and it stays in the 100s in strength.

I only suggested the amplifier as a way to possibly help some of ya'll who seem to have bad strengths. IN the end a good satellite install or tweaking of the dish is needed to get the minimum you can get for the crappy 129 sat. Hopefully the dish 1000.02 will be the answer for the weak satellite at 129 , till they get a new spotbeam satellite up there to replace the bad one up there now by next year or 2008.
 
Register Today to see less ads! It's Free!

Users who are viewing this thread

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top