Live streaming will soon be irrelevant!

comfortably_numb

Dogs have owners, cats have staff
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Nov 30, 2011
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Not exactly what I call compelling:


"Bereft of games from the National Basketball Association, Major League Soccer and the NCAA due to the coronavirus pandemic, ESPN is considering a variety of options, including repackaging archived games and pushing up the release date for original content to fill the air, Burke Magnus, the network’s programming chief, said in a question-and-answer session with its public-relations department Tuesday."
This would be better:

espn.jpg
 

Zookster

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Dec 19, 2004
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A few days ago I received an email promoting the regular Hulu, Disney+, ESPN+ bundle. It was the usual bundle discount price that basically gives you free ESPN+ ($5 off the normal price). If I didn't need ESPN+ last month, I certainly don't need it now. *sheesh*
 

john262

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May 22, 2005
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I think the underlying question is what will happen in 60-90 days when sports are back and later when the new fall seasons shows resume. What will the new normal be?

I do not see much long term change for individuals. I watch quite a bit of sports and OTA network programs. Prior to this, I started streaming some series when none of the shows or games I'm interested in are on. I dont see my interests changing significantly. I'm not going to watch the Hallmark network because of this. I may watch a couple of Marvel movies I might not have on Disney+, maybe. I have watched a little bit of CNN this past weekend. When sports come back, I'm watching that.

I think that's true for everyone. People's central interest won't change. The types of programming they tend to watch won't change. What may change is how they access these shows.

I'm hard pressed to see the current situation drive the change over to on-demand streaming from linear channels.

Now, there is another factor at play... Economics. Lots of people will be out of work. There will be a move to lower costs as budgets demand it. There will be substantial downward cost pressure. Cost was what drove me to YTTV from DirecTV Now, and DirecTV before that.
Sports may not be back in 60 to 90 days. Think more like at least six months and maybe longer than that.
 

Bilbo1

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Jan 31, 2020
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Government officials are preparing for a curve like the one seen in Italy (and now Spain), with cases and deaths continuing to spike. We are a week or two behind Italy and far from a peak. If we had started testing extensively and taking more preventative measures to limit the spread back in January, then we more likely would be on the other side of this by now. The shutdowns and social distancing are designed to "flatten the curve" so hospitals don't get overwhelmed. Unlike COVID-19, there was actually a vaccine and anti-viral treatments for H1N1. That's what makes COVID-19 so scary and why we are seeing such an unprecedented reaction right now to not stop, but slow down its spread. The fact that it's potentially been in the US since January (as you say) spreading undetected makes it all the more potentially scarier. People have been carrying and spreading this virus exponentially through the entire country since then; those with milder symptoms thinking they just had some run-of-the-mill flu. If current efforts to slow the spread are effective, I agree that we may end up seeing an overall lower death rate for COVID-19 than for H1N1.

Here's a week old chart that shows the prospective curve of number of cases:

View attachment 144072
Um, I'd look at rates, not count. The susceptible population of the US is 5 times the population of Italy. For the rate to be the same, the count would be 5 times greater.


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Cheddar_Head

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Feb 13, 2008
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Um, I'd look at rates, not count. The susceptible population of the US is 5 times the population of Italy. For the rate to be the same, the count would be 5 times greater.


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You aren't wrong but I believe that you would also need to factor in lower population densities and greater geographic distances in the US when comparing rates to Italy. But then again maybe not, that's why we have epidemiologists.
 

Zookster

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Dec 19, 2004
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Um, I'd look at rates, not count. The susceptible population of the US is 5 times the population of Italy. For the rate to be the same, the count would be 5 times greater.


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You aren't wrong but I believe that you would also need to factor in lower population densities and greater geographic distances in the US when comparing rates to Italy. But then again maybe not, that's why we have epidemiologists.
The data chart I posted was merely to show the curve of cases (that we are far from a peak), not numerical equivalencies between the two countries.

With the lack of testing in the U.S. (just now starting to become more available), the actual numbers are certainly much, much higher here. If we were testing everyone, even those with minor symptoms and anyone who came in contact, since January like they did in S. Korea, the number of U.S. cases could very well be greater than Italy's by a factor of 10. That's why everything is being shutdown. We just don't know where or how prevelant the disease is here.
 
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mwdxer1

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Nov 3, 2015
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Government officials are preparing for a curve like the one seen in Italy (and now Spain), with cases and deaths continuing to spike. We are a week or two behind Italy and far from a peak. If we had started testing extensively and taking more preventative measures to limit the spread back in January, then we more likely would be on the other side of this by now. The shutdowns and social distancing are designed to "flatten the curve" so hospitals don't get overwhelmed. Unlike COVID-19, there was actually a vaccine and anti-viral treatments for H1N1. That's what makes COVID-19 so scary and why we are seeing such an unprecedented reaction right now to not stop, but slow down its spread. The fact that it's potentially been in the US since January (as you say) spreading undetected makes it all the more potentially scarier. People have been carrying and spreading this virus exponentially through the entire country since then; those with milder symptoms thinking they just had some run-of-the-mill flu. If current efforts to slow the spread are effective, I agree that we may end up seeing an overall lower death rate for COVID-19 than for H1N1.

Here's a week old chart that shows the prospective curve of number of cases:

View attachment 144072
I heard this morning who knows how many have it that have little or no synonyms of the bug? One guy said he didn't even have the cough, just a temp and tightness in his upper chest for a couple of days. He is still quarantined, as he was tested positive, but little issues. Also remember over a million people each year lose their lives from auto accidents and how many lose their lives from murders, or even the more common flu virus. One nice thing about TV, is you say at home and watch it. You do not have to out in front of people. Lots of entertainment in this day.
 

tigerfan33

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Um, I'd look at rates, not count. The susceptible population of the US is 5 times the population of Italy. For the rate to be the same, the count would be 5 times greater.


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Median age in Italy is almost 48 years while here in the US is 37.......should be taking into account also.
 

Bilbo1

SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 31, 2020
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Also remember over a million people each year lose their lives from auto accidents and how many lose their lives from murders, or even the more common flu virus.
In the US, the number of people that die in auto accidents isn't that high, it's less than 40k. Also, less than 40k die of firearm-related injuries.


The problem with COVID-19 is that without intervention, the death toll in the US was predicted to be over 4 million. That's more than the total annual deaths in the US, less than 3 million. I think the estimate for over people 70 was 4-8%. Oh, and influenza killed just over 55k in 2017.


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