No Ground Wire On New Dish Installation (1 Viewer)

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dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
I have other concerns in addition to your dish not being grounded. It could be your old cable tv wires are split- that will cause a really crappy picture and/or loss of signal. Your existing wiring in the house may or may not be RG-6 cable either.....

Guy sounds incompetent. I'd call and demand someone else come out and re-do everything correctly.
"someone else"....Um I don't think so..That somemone else would have to be paid for his work.. Dish won't pay. So the money has to come from somewhere. If it's a DNSC job, fine. they are hourly. If it's a contratcor that returns he is not going to get paid for a new install. He will get creamed financially on that job. No, the original tech must be made to cover his own junk.
 
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dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
Installers do not like to put in correct grounds. It took 3 recalls by dish to my house to get it done correctly. The installer was pissed as the tech I talked to the 3rd time required him to come back and redo the entire installation before he would get paid by dish. He had the gound block on the roof with a copper wire going down to the power ground and all the water from rain was running right down my cables into the center connector and it was getting green from corrsion. Many fly by night installers out there.
All 3 different installers said that if you ground the dish it will get hit by lightning and fry the system and they did not want to he held liable. It has been put in correctly with drip loops etc and no lightening has hit it in over a year.
Yes, using a gound rod is a no no as it could be a a different level of ground than your house ground which is usually your water pipe unless you have a very new house and all plastic pipe, then a ground rod should have been put in by your electrician.
Ok um, "dude", is it?...How about I give you a chance ot edit your post to take out the following statement: "Installers do not like to put in correct grounds
I get real cranky when I see generalized statements that have no basis in fact and are just the rantiungs of a pissed off person who knows no better. Now if you don't want to get flamed, I suggest you rephrase that real quick..I 'll give you a clue. Try inserting the word "some" before the word "installers"...have a wonderful day.
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
CableSux, how can you tell if a house has a ground rod? Aren't they usually driven down below the surface, covered up? My cable coax ground block on the side of the house by the electric meter has a green wire going underground someplace. When I test the water plumbing in the basement at several locations with a multi-meter it appears to be grounded. All of the plumbing in the house is copper with the exception of the incoming pipe from the water meter. It is a black plastic pipe coming thru the basement wall and then attached to copper and a shut off valve.
In order for an acceptabole NEC ground the ater system must be ALL copper. So a water pipe ground is not possibbole in your home. In fact I am shocked that your water service is Poly butylin pipe... With the cold temps there, that line must be pretty deep..Anyway, the main elctrical GND is the best one. Typically we ground to the #6 GND wire that goes from the meter to the GND rod nearby. We do not have to dig around looking fo rthe house GND rod..Actaully according to local code, itis a violation to bury the GND rod..That's local code..
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
My concern was if lightning were to hit the dish, the current would flow through the attic all the way to the ground rod at the other end of the house and potentially cause a fire in the attic.
OK...If lightining hits the dish the last thing I would worry about is the charge going across the cable. Trust me the cabole will not be able to contain that much current. The cable will melt and the enormous power of the lightining would most certainly damage the home in other ways.
I GND everry system. That's by the book and I believe in it. But what I know about lighting and it's potential as one of the most powerful forces of nature makes me chuckle when a customer asks about the Dish and lightining.
 

webbydude

SatelliteGuys Master
Feb 6, 2005
5,339
1
Akron, Ohio, United States
This tech did what any tech would d to get the system grounded. Of course the mistake he made and he may have know this littel trick is he wasted a whole lotof time and material.. He went into the attic. What is the one thing just about every attic has?..A light..Bingo.. My way?...I would have grounded to the light fixture in the attic by attaching a pigtail wire to the ground screw of the light fixture..Do it all the time....Anyway, the tech did the right thing by doing what he knew best to properly ground the system.

Now that raises an interesting question. Is attaching a groundwire to a light fixture a suitable ground as per NEC?
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
Now that raises an interesting question. Is attaching a groundwire to a light fixture a suitable ground as per NEC?
Yes it is..as long as the fixture is properly bonded and has a ground screw it is an acceptable NEC ground. We got that straight from the DNSC by the book QC head honcho.
I am friends with two master electricians and one journeyman .I asked..Trust me I pick their brains all the time.
 
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adavis720

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 15, 2007
253
0
Ok um, "dude", is it?...How about I give you a chance ot edit your post to take out the following statement: "Installers do not like to put in correct grounds
I get real cranky when I see generalized statements that have no basis in fact and are just the rantiungs of a pissed off person who knows no better. Now if you don't want to get flamed, I suggest you rephrase that real quick..I 'll give you a clue. Try inserting the word "some" before the word "installers"...have a wonderful day.

Like the generalizations that you seem to make quite a bit about customers?

I notice that *some* installers really get nasty when they post about customers and it makes me cranky. If you don't like them then why do the job?

No offense intended and I am certainly not trying to start a war, but I think you have forgotten the old story of the pot and the kettle....:)


dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

Could not have written beter myself..I'd like to add that customers seem to be getting more and more high maintenence as the moths pass by..Especially ones that run out an dbuy HD tv's and Home theatre sytems. The kicker is these people sepnd withut doing any reaserch on the product. Then when they get it home thye can't handle it. They call Dish and bitch like little school girls and demand a tech be sent to help ..Of course free of charge..The CSR's issue bogus trouble calls because the customer can't figure out how to change the tv input so their little cupcake can play gamecube..So they call dish and whine like little school girls....Invariably if a customer mebtions cancelling the CSR's set Trouble calls(non pay) and we have to go kiss these people's asses.....This kind of crap is going to backfire on both satco's because good consciencious techs are going to leave the business and what will be left are $12/hr schlubs who don't give sh*t abiout the customers or the customers home . Nor will they give two hoots about the qulality of their work..Mark my words, the satcos wil pay dearly for their shortsightedness....attention customers..Caveat emptor .....and you get what you pay for....There is no such thing as free....

and dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

OK..I run into this all the time. The customer schedules fro a day when they know they have to make special arrangements to be there. Examples are missing work, having to take the kids to school or pick them up, go shopping, get their hair done, etc.
Keep in mind while thre is no excuse for a no call no show, ther are always factors in that effect the techs work day. One which is most prominent is getting stuck on a difficult or time consuming job. Too many times customers get angry with us over stuff that is out of our control. The job you scheduled is most likely the only on ethat tech has that day.
Now , just because Dish tells customers the earliest day doesn't mean the cust MUST choose that day. A customer is always free to choose a day farther out that is most convenient for them. Another example is when the tech arrives within the time frame and the customer says they have an hour before they have to leave. We can't work like that. When appointments ar eset there is a time frame in which the tech is allowed to arrive and be on time. 8-12 or 12-5. Contrary to popular thgought, that means we must arrive between those hrs. Not have the job complete between those hrs.
I try to work my jobs geographically first. Then I prioritize by time frame. I do this because on some days I get all AM or all PM jobs. Since I cannot be in three places at once I must ask customers to be flexible. 95% are flexible.
You got screwed by a no call no show. That's wrong. But you have to be aware that giving just a half day isn't the best idea. Suppose you shceduled for an 8-12 arrical. The tech gets there at say 11am. You have to be realistic and give the tech ample time complete the job. Suppose there is a mega issue that requires a couple hrs of work time. Would you still then get pissed because it took longer than you anticpated and as a result missed a half days work?..It's the same thing. Missed work is missed work, is it not?.

and dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

"Have your husband be reasonable and have HIM tell the installer where a good place is to put the dish. "....
Just a minute.....The customer is NOT the professional...I have run into this type of customer before. The ones that jump to conclusions that we are all screw up's....Here's a bit of advice..DO NOT TELL the installer what to do..That's a sure fire way of getting your install delayed by a bunch of time.
Allow the man to do his job..Most of us will try to find a good sopt for the disgh with aesthetcics in mind. I do this...Upon arrival I immediately go to the rear of the house and look for line of sight there...If it works , that's where it goes...The tech should not do any work before the discussing with the customer how the job will go. Once that uis in hand it is time to start work...Leave the installer to his job..Your input is no longer needed.
Our job is to install the system in a quality manner, communicate with the customer if they have concerns. And perform good customer service..Our job does not include moving your dirty clothes out of the way, jerry jacking heavy furniture all over the room, lifitng 200lb tv's into fire place niches, stacking your CD's from the 300 disc tower you have along side you entertainment center or dodging you antique family heirloom hummels.
Bottom line is this. If you want good customer service, be a good customer.
It cuts both ways.
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
Like the generalizations that you seem to make quite a bit about customers?

I notice that *some* installers really get nasty when they post about customers and it makes me cranky. If you don't like them then why do the job?

No offense intended and I am certainly not trying to start a war, but I think you have forgotten the old story of the pot and the kettle....:)


dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

Could not have written beter myself..I'd like to add that customers seem to be getting more and more high maintenence as the moths pass by..Especially ones that run out an dbuy HD tv's and Home theatre sytems. The kicker is these people sepnd withut doing any reaserch on the product. Then when they get it home thye can't handle it. They call Dish and bitch like little school girls and demand a tech be sent to help ..Of course free of charge..The CSR's issue bogus trouble calls because the customer can't figure out how to change the tv input so their little cupcake can play gamecube..So they call dish and whine like little school girls....Invariably if a customer mebtions cancelling the CSR's set Trouble calls(non pay) and we have to go kiss these people's asses.....This kind of crap is going to backfire on both satco's because good consciencious techs are going to leave the business and what will be left are $12/hr schlubs who don't give sh*t abiout the customers or the customers home . Nor will they give two hoots about the qulality of their work..Mark my words, the satcos wil pay dearly for their shortsightedness....attention customers..Caveat emptor .....and you get what you pay for....There is no such thing as free....

and dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

OK..I run into this all the time. The customer schedules fro a day when they know they have to make special arrangements to be there. Examples are missing work, having to take the kids to school or pick them up, go shopping, get their hair done, etc.
Keep in mind while thre is no excuse for a no call no show, ther are always factors in that effect the techs work day. One which is most prominent is getting stuck on a difficult or time consuming job. Too many times customers get angry with us over stuff that is out of our control. The job you scheduled is most likely the only on ethat tech has that day.
Now , just because Dish tells customers the earliest day doesn't mean the cust MUST choose that day. A customer is always free to choose a day farther out that is most convenient for them. Another example is when the tech arrives within the time frame and the customer says they have an hour before they have to leave. We can't work like that. When appointments ar eset there is a time frame in which the tech is allowed to arrive and be on time. 8-12 or 12-5. Contrary to popular thgought, that means we must arrive between those hrs. Not have the job complete between those hrs.
I try to work my jobs geographically first. Then I prioritize by time frame. I do this because on some days I get all AM or all PM jobs. Since I cannot be in three places at once I must ask customers to be flexible. 95% are flexible.
You got screwed by a no call no show. That's wrong. But you have to be aware that giving just a half day isn't the best idea. Suppose you shceduled for an 8-12 arrical. The tech gets there at say 11am. You have to be realistic and give the tech ample time complete the job. Suppose there is a mega issue that requires a couple hrs of work time. Would you still then get pissed because it took longer than you anticpated and as a result missed a half days work?..It's the same thing. Missed work is missed work, is it not?.

and dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

"Have your husband be reasonable and have HIM tell the installer where a good place is to put the dish. "....
Just a minute.....The customer is NOT the professional...I have run into this type of customer before. The ones that jump to conclusions that we are all screw up's....Here's a bit of advice..DO NOT TELL the installer what to do..That's a sure fire way of getting your install delayed by a bunch of time.
Allow the man to do his job..Most of us will try to find a good sopt for the disgh with aesthetcics in mind. I do this...Upon arrival I immediately go to the rear of the house and look for line of sight there...If it works , that's where it goes...The tech should not do any work before the discussing with the customer how the job will go. Once that uis in hand it is time to start work...Leave the installer to his job..Your input is no longer needed.
Our job is to install the system in a quality manner, communicate with the customer if they have concerns. And perform good customer service..Our job does not include moving your dirty clothes out of the way, jerry jacking heavy furniture all over the room, lifitng 200lb tv's into fire place niches, stacking your CD's from the 300 disc tower you have along side you entertainment center or dodging you antique family heirloom hummels.
Bottom line is this. If you want good customer service, be a good customer.
It cuts both ways.
Yes and I see you left out the post where I stated that 99% of all customers are good people and appreciate the job I do for them. But I guess that just didn't fit your agenda.
I am certainly not the only tech that posts on here that has gripes and horror stories to tell about customer issues. I think the high horse you were riding on just ran off. See ya..
 

adavis720

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 15, 2007
253
0
And you chose not to read *some* techs.

I can't understand how when confronted with your own words you just ignore the facts and focus on what you said but I didn't post, but I guess facing the issue at hand doesn't fit your agenda.

No high horse here, just the facts ma'am.

See ya...
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
Like the generalizations that you seem to make quite a bit about customers?

I notice that *some* installers really get nasty when they post about customers and it makes me cranky. If you don't like them then why do the job?

No offense intended and I am certainly not trying to start a war, but I think you have forgotten the old story of the pot and the kettle....:)


dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

Could not have written beter myself..I'd like to add that customers seem to be getting more and more high maintenence as the moths pass by..Especially ones that run out an dbuy HD tv's and Home theatre sytems. The kicker is these people sepnd withut doing any reaserch on the product. Then when they get it home thye can't handle it. They call Dish and bitch like little school girls and demand a tech be sent to help ..Of course free of charge..The CSR's issue bogus trouble calls because the customer can't figure out how to change the tv input so their little cupcake can play gamecube..So they call dish and whine like little school girls....Invariably if a customer mebtions cancelling the CSR's set Trouble calls(non pay) and we have to go kiss these people's asses.....This kind of crap is going to backfire on both satco's because good consciencious techs are going to leave the business and what will be left are $12/hr schlubs who don't give sh*t abiout the customers or the customers home . Nor will they give two hoots about the qulality of their work..Mark my words, the satcos wil pay dearly for their shortsightedness....attention customers..Caveat emptor .....and you get what you pay for....There is no such thing as free....

and dishcomm
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Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

OK..I run into this all the time. The customer schedules fro a day when they know they have to make special arrangements to be there. Examples are missing work, having to take the kids to school or pick them up, go shopping, get their hair done, etc.
Keep in mind while thre is no excuse for a no call no show, ther are always factors in that effect the techs work day. One which is most prominent is getting stuck on a difficult or time consuming job. Too many times customers get angry with us over stuff that is out of our control. The job you scheduled is most likely the only on ethat tech has that day.
Now , just because Dish tells customers the earliest day doesn't mean the cust MUST choose that day. A customer is always free to choose a day farther out that is most convenient for them. Another example is when the tech arrives within the time frame and the customer says they have an hour before they have to leave. We can't work like that. When appointments ar eset there is a time frame in which the tech is allowed to arrive and be on time. 8-12 or 12-5. Contrary to popular thgought, that means we must arrive between those hrs. Not have the job complete between those hrs.
I try to work my jobs geographically first. Then I prioritize by time frame. I do this because on some days I get all AM or all PM jobs. Since I cannot be in three places at once I must ask customers to be flexible. 95% are flexible.
You got screwed by a no call no show. That's wrong. But you have to be aware that giving just a half day isn't the best idea. Suppose you shceduled for an 8-12 arrical. The tech gets there at say 11am. You have to be realistic and give the tech ample time complete the job. Suppose there is a mega issue that requires a couple hrs of work time. Would you still then get pissed because it took longer than you anticpated and as a result missed a half days work?..It's the same thing. Missed work is missed work, is it not?.

and dishcomm
user_online.gif

Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

"Have your husband be reasonable and have HIM tell the installer where a good place is to put the dish. "....
Just a minute.....The customer is NOT the professional...I have run into this type of customer before. The ones that jump to conclusions that we are all screw up's....Here's a bit of advice..DO NOT TELL the installer what to do..That's a sure fire way of getting your install delayed by a bunch of time.
Allow the man to do his job..Most of us will try to find a good sopt for the disgh with aesthetcics in mind. I do this...Upon arrival I immediately go to the rear of the house and look for line of sight there...If it works , that's where it goes...The tech should not do any work before the discussing with the customer how the job will go. Once that uis in hand it is time to start work...Leave the installer to his job..Your input is no longer needed.
Our job is to install the system in a quality manner, communicate with the customer if they have concerns. And perform good customer service..Our job does not include moving your dirty clothes out of the way, jerry jacking heavy furniture all over the room, lifitng 200lb tv's into fire place niches, stacking your CD's from the 300 disc tower you have along side you entertainment center or dodging you antique family heirloom hummels.
Bottom line is this. If you want good customer service, be a good customer.
It cuts both ways.
BTW I did not generalize I merely stated facts based on my experience with individual customers. I never mentioned "all" not did I lump customers into one category as the OP did against techicians. Once again, time to retrieve your high horse.
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
Like the generalizations that you seem to make quite a bit about customers?

I notice that *some* installers really get nasty when they post about customers and it makes me cranky. If you don't like them then why do the job?

No offense intended and I am certainly not trying to start a war, but I think you have forgotten the old story of the pot and the kettle....:)


dishcomm
user_online.gif

Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

Could not have written beter myself..I'd like to add that customers seem to be getting more and more high maintenence as the moths pass by..Especially ones that run out an dbuy HD tv's and Home theatre sytems. The kicker is these people sepnd withut doing any reaserch on the product. Then when they get it home thye can't handle it. They call Dish and bitch like little school girls and demand a tech be sent to help ..Of course free of charge..The CSR's issue bogus trouble calls because the customer can't figure out how to change the tv input so their little cupcake can play gamecube..So they call dish and whine like little school girls....Invariably if a customer mebtions cancelling the CSR's set Trouble calls(non pay) and we have to go kiss these people's asses.....This kind of crap is going to backfire on both satco's because good consciencious techs are going to leave the business and what will be left are $12/hr schlubs who don't give sh*t abiout the customers or the customers home . Nor will they give two hoots about the qulality of their work..Mark my words, the satcos wil pay dearly for their shortsightedness....attention customers..Caveat emptor .....and you get what you pay for....There is no such thing as free....

and dishcomm
user_online.gif

Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

OK..I run into this all the time. The customer schedules fro a day when they know they have to make special arrangements to be there. Examples are missing work, having to take the kids to school or pick them up, go shopping, get their hair done, etc.
Keep in mind while thre is no excuse for a no call no show, ther are always factors in that effect the techs work day. One which is most prominent is getting stuck on a difficult or time consuming job. Too many times customers get angry with us over stuff that is out of our control. The job you scheduled is most likely the only on ethat tech has that day.
Now , just because Dish tells customers the earliest day doesn't mean the cust MUST choose that day. A customer is always free to choose a day farther out that is most convenient for them. Another example is when the tech arrives within the time frame and the customer says they have an hour before they have to leave. We can't work like that. When appointments ar eset there is a time frame in which the tech is allowed to arrive and be on time. 8-12 or 12-5. Contrary to popular thgought, that means we must arrive between those hrs. Not have the job complete between those hrs.
I try to work my jobs geographically first. Then I prioritize by time frame. I do this because on some days I get all AM or all PM jobs. Since I cannot be in three places at once I must ask customers to be flexible. 95% are flexible.
You got screwed by a no call no show. That's wrong. But you have to be aware that giving just a half day isn't the best idea. Suppose you shceduled for an 8-12 arrical. The tech gets there at say 11am. You have to be realistic and give the tech ample time complete the job. Suppose there is a mega issue that requires a couple hrs of work time. Would you still then get pissed because it took longer than you anticpated and as a result missed a half days work?..It's the same thing. Missed work is missed work, is it not?.

and dishcomm
user_online.gif

Senior Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Indian trail,NC
Posts: 1,812

Quote:

"Have your husband be reasonable and have HIM tell the installer where a good place is to put the dish. "....
Just a minute.....The customer is NOT the professional...I have run into this type of customer before. The ones that jump to conclusions that we are all screw up's....Here's a bit of advice..DO NOT TELL the installer what to do..That's a sure fire way of getting your install delayed by a bunch of time.
Allow the man to do his job..Most of us will try to find a good sopt for the disgh with aesthetcics in mind. I do this...Upon arrival I immediately go to the rear of the house and look for line of sight there...If it works , that's where it goes...The tech should not do any work before the discussing with the customer how the job will go. Once that uis in hand it is time to start work...Leave the installer to his job..Your input is no longer needed.
Our job is to install the system in a quality manner, communicate with the customer if they have concerns. And perform good customer service..Our job does not include moving your dirty clothes out of the way, jerry jacking heavy furniture all over the room, lifitng 200lb tv's into fire place niches, stacking your CD's from the 300 disc tower you have along side you entertainment center or dodging you antique family heirloom hummels.
Bottom line is this. If you want good customer service, be a good customer.
It cuts both ways.
If you are not trying to start a war ,then don't.
 

adavis720

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 15, 2007
253
0
BTW I did not generalize I merely stated facts based on my experience with individual customers. I never mentioned "all" not did I lump customers into one category as the OP did against techicians. Once again, time to retrieve your high horse.

I thought you dismissed me with your "See Ya."

What happened? How many more times are you going to post back?

Seems like I have hit a nerve here...

I have you dead to rights, my advice - just let it go.

At this point, I am done with the conversation, best wishes.
 

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,381
544
suburbia
And you chose not to read *some* techs.

I can't understand how when confronted with your own words you just ignore the facts and focus on what you said but I didn't post, but I guess facing the issue at hand doesn't fit your agenda.

No high horse here, just the facts ma'am.

See ya...
Though you weren't trying to start a war.. BTW..What facts?..Are you implying that I have no business posting personal experinces that I have had with a few customers?.. What the hell is this happy land?
Look pal, I am ending this right now. You're dead worng. If you want to keep harping on this ,you are free to have the last word. Unless of course you want the war you stated you weren't trying to start..Piece of advice, don't go there. Just let it go. We're done.. BTW you're wrong.
 

skyviewmark

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 29, 2006
1,630
23
Bay Minette, Al
My concern was if lightning were to hit the dish, the current would flow through the attic all the way to the ground rod at the other end of the house and potentially cause a fire in the attic.

If lighting were to actually hit your dish, your main concern should probably be how fast of a response time the local fire department has to get there. Grounding or not grounding is a question that will go on for until the end of time. Grounding is not going to affect your reception, or how your system works, no matter what. Grounding is part of a NEC Code. And in my personal opinion, the only reason it is there is for liability reasons. Lawsuits ruin the world. I have been a tech since the days of the BUD C-Band Dishes. I have seen lightning actually strike a dish twice. And it wasn't pretty when it all finished. Ground or no ground wouldn't have helped. The systems that I have seen damaged were all grounded systems. In most cases the lighting damage that occurs came in one of two ways.. The power outlet, because the power line was hit out at the pole or the Phone line for the same reason. Most can avoid damage by using a decent surge protector for both power and phone, although they are deffinitely not infallable either. But they can help for minor power surges. Grounding is not going to change any of that. This arguement will never be solved. In my case from what I see, it's the younger or newer techs that tend to make the argument for grounding because they have been indoctrinated by the company they work for that an ungrounded system doesn't work right. Most of the older techs like me and many others that I know, all know that the ground really doesn't do anything except make people feel safer.
 

Dish Dude

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 11, 2005
354
0
IF your dish gets a direct hit, it will blow out the roof no matter if the cables run through it or not. Grounding a dish doesn't protect from lightning strikes it reduces the chance of the dish getting hit by lightning. By correctly grounding the system, ie utility ground within 15 ft of the service meter, this greatly reduces the potential resistance difference between the earth and the static buildup on the dish. the ground wire dissipates the build up back to the earth. By no means does it increase the potential to be hit. Also on this note if the ground for the house is incorrect, not buried deep enough to meet the earth's potential, anywhere between 4 and 12 ft, depending on soil content, water table, etc. Most requirements are 6-8 foot ground rods, than the dish's ground could pose the difference attracting potential energy
 

highdefjeff

SatelliteGuys Pro
Oct 20, 2006
615
1
St. Louis
Exactly!

IF your dish gets a direct hit, it will blow out the roof no matter if the cables run through it or not. Grounding a dish doesn't protect from lightning strikes it reduces the chance of the dish getting hit by lightning. By correctly grounding the system, ie utility ground within 15 ft of the service meter, this greatly reduces the potential resistance difference between the earth and the static buildup on the dish. the ground wire dissipates the build up back to the earth. By no means does it increase the potential to be hit. Also on this note if the ground for the house is incorrect, not buried deep enough to meet the earth's potential, anywhere between 4 and 12 ft, depending on soil content, water table, etc. Most requirements are 6-8 foot ground rods, than the dish's ground could pose the difference attracting potential energy

That's it Dish Dude!

Why Ground?
 

Mike_H

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 8, 2003
770
5
Twin Cities, MN
Hmm, last time I checked, the radio tower used by the local FM station didn't blow up after being hit with lighting.

Leave it be said, installers are required to ground any antenna system per NEC requirements. To not do so removes the measure of human safety that the NEC regulations attempt to provide.
 

CableSux

SatelliteGuys Family
Dec 15, 2004
49
0
Michigan (Flint area)
CableSux, how can you tell if a house has a ground rod? Aren't they usually driven down below the surface, covered up? My cable coax ground block on the side of the house by the electric meter has a green wire going underground someplace. When I test the water plumbing in the basement at several locations with a multi-meter it appears to be grounded. All of the plumbing in the house is copper with the exception of the incoming pipe from the water meter. It is a black plastic pipe coming thru the basement wall and then attached to copper and a shut off valve.

Most houses around here you'll see a #6 or #4 bare twisted copper wire going from inside the house/basement to the outside to the ground rod. The top of the rod should be a few inches above ground, but they can get covered up over time or if they use mulch for landscaping. If you look at your circuit breaker box, you should see the copper wire coming out of it, if it's not drywalled in. In fact, by code here, there should be another bare copper wire going from the same box to the water pipes, if they are copper. That's why I was surprised to see a well built new house with no ground wires anywhere, and pass inspection.
 
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