NON-SATELLITE SUMMER PROJECTS (TREES) (1 Viewer)

AcWxRadar

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
I have not been very active with my satellite hobby this summer - which is usual. Thought I would just drop by and chat about my other projects.

Ordered and received 20 American Elm trees this week. These are Princeton Elm trees and they are a cultivar of the original American Elm that is resistant to DED (Dutch Elm Disease). The National Arboretum went out into communities and found all the Elm trees that did not succomb to DED. They then grafted prunings from these trees and grew them to a semi-mature status and purposely injected them with the DED fungus.

The DED fungus is carried by the Elm boring beetle. The beetle is a small insect that borrows through the tree bark and makes tunnels in the outer wood of the tree (in the cambium/phloem and outer sapwood layers). The beetles carry a fungus under their wings and as they burrow through the tree, the fungus finds a new, more habital home to live in the tree itself. The fungus grows in the "viens" of the tree like cholesterol in the human blood vessels and restricts the exchange of water and nutrients between the roots and the leaves of the tree. This eventually kills the tree.

After injecting the cultivars of a surviving Elm tree with the fungus, if that tree does not succomb to DED, then you may repropigate the cultivars from that tree and replant them without or with much less fear that they will ever get DED.

The DED is named Ducth Elm Disease because it was a Dutch botanist or research group that discovered what the fungus actually was. The fungus originated in China and the European Elm Beetle carried the fungus to Siberian Elm trees. These Elm trees are normally resistant to it. The fungus spread over Europe and started infecting other species of Elms that could not handle the fungus as well or at all.

In the 1920's through the 30's, American furniture manufacturer's were buying Elm wood from France. The fungus was in that wood and when the logs were transported to America, the American Elm beetle picked up the fungus because it burrowed into the logs from Fance. The American Elm beetle then began to spread that fungus to all the American Elm trees in the US starting in the Indiana and Ohio areas (roughly).

The American Elm (Ulmus americana) had no resistance to this fungus. By the 1970's, almost the entire population of American Elms in the US had been dessimated, except for a few here and there. Those surviving American Elms had some built-in genetic resistance to the DED. Botanists have been researching this phenomenon for decades and have developed cultivars from the surviving trees to re-establish the population.

Some of the top cultivars are the Princeton, Prairie Expedition, Jefferson and New Harmony Elm varieties. I ordered 20 Princeton Elms and am growing them now.

RADAR
 

AcWxRadar

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
NON-SATELLITE SUMMER PROJECTS (BAIT TANK)

I do a lot of catfishing here in Nebraska. Flathead catfish is my specialty. I use 5"-6" live bullheads and hand-sized bluegills for bait as Flathead Catfish are predatory fish and only eat live prey, which is contrary to the popular myth that catfish are bottom feeders, they are not. However, the Channel Catfish and the Blue Catfish are more opportunistic feeders and will eat stuff like chicken guts and smelly, dead shad sides!

Anyway, I fish for Flathead Catfish. They have almost pure white meat and can be mistaken for Walleye or Northern if they are prepared and cooked properly.

To keep an ample supply of bait, I bought a 1,000 gallon poly tank (~10 feet x ~6 feet x 30 inches). This is a lot of water and, since a bait tank always gets dirty eventually, I wanted to set up a filtration system to clean the water, instead of replacing it.

I came up with this design - three 55 gallon, plastic food-grade barrels hooked in series.
The 1,000 gallon bait tank gravity feeds into the bottom of the first 55 gallon barrel. In that barrel, the water swirls upward to the overflow to the next tank in the series. At the top of this first tank, I placed rolls of porous furnace / air filter media (like scotch-brite pads, but not as rough). This filter media attracts and grows algae that consume ammonia. When fish breath, they give off mostly ammonia (whereas humans give off CO2). The water flows out of tank #1 and into the bottom of tank #2, mostly ammonia-free.

In tank #2, I placed a perforated platform about 6"-8" off the bottom. The water percolates up through this platform (made of 1/2" poly). On top of the poly, there is a layer of lava rock, then crushed marble, topped with pea gravel and then course zeolite sand. These layers filter the water and purify it.

The outflow from the second tank flows into the bottom of the third tank. The third tank has a perforated platform that the water percolates up through, then is further filtered and clarified by activated charcoal (carbon) and is also aerated.

A submersible pond pump hanging in this third tank pumps the water back to the bait tank.

In the first tank, I also have placed a stock-tank deicer heater to keep the water from freezing and to keep the algae active during winter. This whole system is outdoors, so it must be heated during winter slightly.

There are aerator hoses and tubes in each filter tank. I use soaker hose for gardens for an aerator instead of a stone. These get plugged up eventually, but I have them inserted so that they are easily replaceable. In tank #2, I installed an array of schedule 80, 1/2" PVC with holes drilled in it that I can connect to my high pressure air compressor. This allows me to purge the sediment filter when it gets dirty. I will "boil" the rock/gravel/zeolite with air and tap water to clean it out and let the dirty water go out the overflow.

If you have a Koi pond, I can write out the instructions and material list in detail for you to use. It will keep your pond clear as a bell and your fish happy and healthy!

RADAR
 
Last edited:

jayn_j

Press On Regardless
Supporting Founder
Sep 29, 2003
10,663
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Sheboygan, WI
Thanks for the discussion on disease resistant elms. I was unaware of them, need to replace some trees, and I really miss those old elm trees.
 

AcWxRadar

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
Thanks for the discussion on disease resistant elms. I was unaware of them, need to replace some trees, and I really miss those old elm trees.

Jayn_j,

If you are interested in these Elm trees I would contact Mike Shade at The BotanyShop in Joplin , MO 417-781-6431 which is where I purchased the Princeton Elms. They were only $10 each for 30-36 inch trees with the root ball in a quart container. 20 trees cost me $300 ($100 of that was for shipping). I think they will be closed for a week or maybe two for the Labor Day holiday period.

RADAR
 

AcWxRadar

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Pro
Apr 26, 2006
4,575
4
40 miles NW of Omaha. Omaha?
I do a lot of catfishing here in Nebraska. Flathead catfish is my specialty. I use 5"-6" live bullheads and hand-sized bluegills for bait as Flathead Catfish are predatory fish and only eat live prey, which is contrary to the popular myth that catfish are bottom feeders, they are not. However, the Channel Catfish and the Blue Catfish are more opportunistic feeders and will eat stuff like chicken guts and smelly, dead shad sides!

Anyway, I fish for Flathead Catfish. They have almost pure white meat and can be mistaken for Walleye or Northern if they are prepared and cooked properly.

To keep an ample supply of bait, I bought a 1,000 gallon poly tank (~10 feet x ~6 feet x 30 inches). This is a lot of water and, since a bait tank always gets dirty eventually, I wanted to set up a filtration system to clean the water, instead of replacing it.

I came up with this design - three 55 gallon, plastic food-grade barrels hooked in series.
The 1,000 gallon bait tank gravity feeds into the bottom of the first 55 gallon barrel. In that barrel, the water swirls upward to the overflow to the next tank in the series. In this tank (tank #1), I placed a perforated platform about 6"-8" off the bottom. The water percolates up through this platform (made of 1/2" poly). On top of the poly, there is a layer of lava rock, then crushed marble, topped with pea gravel and then course zeolite sand. These layers filter the water and purify it.

The outflow from the first tank flows into the bottom of the second tank. At the top of this first tank, I placed rolls of porous furnace / air filter media (like scotch-brite pads, but not as rough). This filter media attracts and grows algae that consume ammonia. When fish breath, they give off mostly ammonia (whereas humans give off CO2). The water flows out of tank #2 and into the bottom of tank #3, mostly ammonia-free.

The third tank has a perforated platform that the water percolates up through, then is further filtered and clarified by activated charcoal (carbon) and is also aerated.

A submersible pond pump hanging in this third tank pumps the water back to the bait tank.

In the second tank, I also have placed a stock-tank deicer heater to keep the water from freezing and to keep the algae active during winter. This whole system is outdoors, so it must be heated during winter slightly.

There are aerator hoses and tubes in each filter tank. I use soaker hose for gardens for an aerator instead of a stone. These get plugged up eventually, but I have them inserted so that they are easily replaceable. In tank #1, I installed an array of schedule 80, 1/2" PVC with holes drilled in it that I can connect to my high pressure air compressor. This allows me to purge the sediment filter when it gets dirty. I will "boil" the rock/gravel/zeolite with air and tap water to clean it out and let the dirty water go out the overflow.

If you have a Koi pond, I can write out the instructions and material list in detail for you to use. It will keep your pond clear as a bell and your fish happy and healthy!

RADAR

I had to make some changes to my design (changes are written into the edited quote above).

I basically swapped the function of tanks #1 and #2 because it was better to filter the crud and sediments out of the water before running it through the bio-mass filter tank. The bio-mass filter can get plugged quickly with debris from the pond / bait tank so I switched the filtering media from tank #1 to #2 and #2 to #1. I have also moved the heater and specific aeration systems from tank #1 to tank #2 as well. Wanted to clarify the change and reason as to why.

RADAR
 

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