Plug Hopper 3 and Wireless access point in to surge supressor? (1 Viewer)

judyintexas

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SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 8, 2007
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In the past Dish has always asked me to plug its devices directly into the wall. For awhile we lived with the cord for the VIP522 strung across the room in order to do so. We simply don't have enough wall outlets close to the setup for this.

Today we are getting a Hopper3. A wireless access point will be installed too.

Why does Dish want these devices plugged in to the wall, when the maker of every other device in the media center recommends using a surge suppressor?
 

navychop

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In the past Dish has always asked me to plug its devices directly into the wall. For awhile we lived with the cord for the VIP522 strung across the room in order to do so. We simply don't have enough wall outlets close to the setup for this.

Today we are getting a Hopper3. A wireless access point will be installed too.

Why does Dish want these devices plugged in to the wall, when the maker of every other device in the media center recommends using a surge suppressor?
Because, I think, so many suppressors are cheap garbage that may introduce problems.

I keep my two HTs, including HWSes, plugged in to APC combined surge suppressors, UPSes and line conditioners. Uncheap overkill. But initially needed for an overloaded household circuit, which I rewired.
 

Tony S

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I have been using a Newpoint surge suppressor for about 20 years now. It has worked with the model 4000, 501, 522, 622, 722, 722K, and HWS receivers without any problems. It filters the AC, satellite, and phone signals. If you get a good suppressor, you shouldn't have any problems.
 

judyintexas

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 8, 2007
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10
Thank you. Ours are good ones, and based on comments from you and others, I will look in to getting a UPS for the media center devices. On other threads I read some advice on selecting a UPS for this use.
 

comfortably_numb

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I have my Hopper 3, my router, my DSL modem, and both my computers on UPS. As an IT person, UPS battery backups are industry standard and required in any computerized environment. I carry that line of thinking home with me. Where I live, we have an inordinate amount of power outages. The UPS keeps voltage consistent and the voltage regulator catches spikes. Not to mention the added bonus of keeping your DVR recordings going during a brief outage.

Just make sure you buy the right size UPS for the equipment that will be plugged in to it. TV's (especially LCD TV's) draw a lot of power and will drain the batteries more quickly during an outage. If the power goes out, I turn my TV off immediately.
 

Cheddar_Head

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Feb 13, 2008
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Re Surge Suppressors: Inexpensive suppressors use a metal oxide varistors (MOV) to provide the surge suppression. MOVs age over time and will become ineffective and can even cause the surge suppressor to malfunction. CSRs will tell you to plug directly into a wall outlet to ensure that an aging surge suppressor isn't causing the problem (They don't know this is the reason). If you are using an UPS to provide power just tell the CSR that you are plugged directly into the wall and proceed.
 

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