Removed RVU Client From Account

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JeremyL

JeremyL

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Jun 1, 2006
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My Samsung 4K TV died and I replaced it with a non-Samsung TV. I rarely watched DirecTV on it to begin with, so I deleted the RVU client from my account.

The CSR said I need to return the client and told me to take it to the local Fed Ex Office and they'd take care of it.

Now, we all know the RVU "client" is actually part of the TV, so I'm not sure what they want me to return.

The DECA is how they hooked my system up to the internet. I asked at Fed Ex Office if they wanted it back and was told it's an accessory and DirecTV doesn't want it back.

So, should I just not send anything back and let it go?
 
alnielsen

alnielsen

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I maybe stating the obvious here. But, you could call back and talk to another CSR to straighten it out. Or, just wait and see how things turn out. It should get caught once they find that they can't bill you for an RVU.
 
raoul5788

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Just to be sure you don't get into billing hell, I would call and make sure they understand you were using rvu, not a client.
 
Claude Greiner

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The CSR likely did not know what an RVU client was.

I tried to activate an RVU client a few years back for a customer and the CSR gave me such a hard time I just installed regular client.

Wasn’t worth arguing with the customer.

Besides, they should never charge $7 to allow the RVU to be used.
 
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DetFan

DetFan

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How's this RVU work?
Is it better than using a wiress reciever in terms of using less tuners off of my genie?

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
Scott Greczkowski

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RVU means there is a receiver emulator built into your TV.

This means you don't need a receiver on the TV. Although they charge you just like you have another receiver.
 
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slice1900

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Yes, as moronic as Comcast (eventually) going to charge $7.50 to use your own Roku as an A/O. :rolleyes:

That's the inevitable outcome of the FCC letting providers off the hook for cable card support - they have to keep supporting them as long as they still have equipment they own that uses cable cards, but once those are all gone there's a very good chance all their customers with a Tivo will be screwed. Then the best way to avoid crazy fees from the cable company if you have a lot of TVs will be gone.

Fortunately my cable provider is one of those that made a deal with Tivo, so I can be pretty sure that my Tivo (which I own and only pay $1.95/month for cable card rental) will continue to be supported for years to come.
 
rad

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How's this RVU work?
Is it better than using a wiress reciever in terms of using less tuners off of my genie?

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Frankly to me the only reason for using RVU is that you don't need the external set top box, making the install look a bit nicer. But DIRECTV also say you MUST use a coax connection to the TV and a DECA to have a supported configuration, using ethernet will work but DIRECTV doesn't support it. Another downside of the RVU client method is you're counting on the TV manufactures to keep their software up to date and push out any bug fixes, that lasts maybe 1 to 2 years, after that you don't see anything while a DIRECTV hardware client is maintained by DIRECTV.

What I'd REALLY like to see happen is that DIRECTV and the set makers get together and come up with sets that have wireless adapters that pair up with the DIRECTV private wireless network that their C41W/C61W clients use. That way the TV needs only a power cord making for a very clean installation for something like a TV on a kitchen counter. But since RVU and wireless has been out for awhile now, and it hasn't happened so far, I don't see it ever happening.
 
DetFan

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If only they’d just let us have two Genies. In his day and age it’s insane that they don’t. It solve all of my problems.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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slice1900

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What I'd REALLY like to see happen is that DIRECTV and the set makers get together and come up with sets that have wireless adapters that pair up with the DIRECTV private wireless network that their C41W/C61W clients use. That way the TV needs only a power cord making for a very clean installation for something like a TV on a kitchen counter. But since RVU and wireless has been out for awhile now, and it hasn't happened so far, I don't see it ever happening.

Well ethernet is unsupported but it works, and I'd think the same would be true for wireless. If your 'smart TV' is able to work over wireless for other apps like Amazon Prime Video or whatever, I don't know why it wouldn't for Directv. The trick is that your TV wouldn't be able to connect to Directv's wireless from the Genie, but it will connect to your wireless LAN. So you just need to bridge your wireless LAN to Directv's whole home network.

Plugging a wired DECA/CCK (that's got coax back to your splitter etc.) into your router/home network should do the trick. It will pick up an IP address on your home LAN, on the same network that your TV will if you "connect" it to your router wirelessly. I see no reason why RVU shouldn't work in such a case, since as far as the Genie knows that RVU connection will be coming via coax...

I guess the only gotcha is if Directv forced them to make the RVU app refuse to work over the wireless interface. Even then you could still do a wireless connection if you really wanted, though it would involve using a second router in AP mode to bridge to the first (i.e. it wouldn't eliminate extra wires/boxes, but it would make a connection possible if you want your TV somewhere where there is no coax and no ethernet)
 
Scott Greczkowski

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Mine is hooked up over Ethernet and it works fine. Even 4K works without issue.


Sent from my iPhone using the SatelliteGuys app!
 
rad

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Well ethernet is unsupported but it works, and I'd think the same would be true for wireless. If your 'smart TV' is able to work over wireless for other apps like Amazon Prime Video or whatever, I don't know why it wouldn't for Directv. The trick is that your TV wouldn't be able to connect to Directv's wireless from the Genie, but it will connect to your wireless LAN. So you just need to bridge your wireless LAN to Directv's whole home network.

Plugging a wired DECA/CCK (that's got coax back to your splitter etc.) into your router/home network should do the trick. It will pick up an IP address on your home LAN, on the same network that your TV will if you "connect" it to your router wirelessly. I see no reason why RVU shouldn't work in such a case, since as far as the Genie knows that RVU connection will be coming via coax...

I guess the only gotcha is if Directv forced them to make the RVU app refuse to work over the wireless interface. Even then you could still do a wireless connection if you really wanted, though it would involve using a second router in AP mode to bridge to the first (i.e. it wouldn't eliminate extra wires/boxes, but it would make a connection possible if you want your TV somewhere where there is no coax and no ethernet)

Don’t know about LG or Sony but Samsung will not allow you to select the Genie if the TV has only a wireless connection.

Yes all, I know Ethernet works, all I said is that it was unsupported.
 
Jimbo

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Hey Jeremy,
Did you get ahold of D* and straighten this out ?

Call them and tell them again that its a RVU and if they insist on you sending it back again ....
Ask them for the address ... what the heck, the TV is dead .... send it to them ... On THIER cost of course. :biggrin
 
JeremyL

JeremyL

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Jun 1, 2006
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Chatham, IL
Hey Jeremy,
Did you get ahold of D* and straighten this out ?

Call them and tell them again that its a RVU and if they insist on you sending it back again ....
Ask them for the address ... what the heck, the TV is dead .... send it to them ... On THIER cost of course. :biggrin

I decided to just let it go and see what happens. It's over 30 days now and no charges have shown up.
 
J

Joe The Dragon

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Sep 19, 2008
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That's the inevitable outcome of the FCC letting providers off the hook for cable card support - they have to keep supporting them as long as they still have equipment they own that uses cable cards, but once those are all gone there's a very good chance all their customers with a Tivo will be screwed. Then the best way to avoid crazy fees from the cable company if you have a lot of TVs will be gone.

Fortunately my cable provider is one of those that made a deal with Tivo, so I can be pretty sure that my Tivo (which I own and only pay $1.95/month for cable card rental) will continue to be supported for years to come.
made a deal with tivo. So they will have an cable tivo at $15-$20 main box and $5-10 each mini box. (must rent them.)
 
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slice1900

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made a deal with tivo. So they will have an cable tivo at $15-$20 main box and $5-10 each mini box. (must rent them.)

If your cable company has ANY devices that use cable cards, they are REQUIRED by law to rent cable cards to end users. So you can rent one cable card, and buy your own Tivo and minis. Then the only thing you pay to your cable company is the rental for that cable card. I pay $1.99/month to Mediacom for the cable card for my Tivo, but other cable companies charge more. You pay more up front for the Tivo plus lifetime service, but at the rates you quote it would pay for itself in no time if you have several TVs.
 
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