T-Mobile and Sprint could announce their merger in October

Discussion in 'General Phone News' started by Poke, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. *** WELCOME TO SATELLITEGUYS! ***
  2. DRAT!

    (As cleaned up by automiscorrect)
     
  3. My 55+ plan says "forever."

    Guess I'd better get a magnifying glass and read the fine print.
     
  4. Aw, shucks!

    :D
     
  5. Yes it is dead.

    But I have an idea for T-Mobile. They should take on a secondary PO top raise cash to buy Dish Network. This would get them the spectrum they need to compete with Verizon and AT&T to be equal maybe even better than them. This is a great time to make an offer now for DISH because the stock has fallen from $65 to $50 since August and has no real catalyst for recovery. Make it a stock + cash Merger deal with John Legere CEO of the merged company.

    I have no stock position in either company. But I see competition a good thing and this would increase the competition to 3 major's in the wireless business. I like Legere CEO of T-Mobile and think his leadership has been great for the company, but for him to continue, he needs more spectrum and a larger nation wide footprint. Dish Merger would do that. Am I wrong on this?
     
    osu1991 likes this.
  6. I would think it is something that should be pursued, but would Charlie be amenable?
     
    osu1991 likes this.
  7. Big IF. And how would Echostar factor in to this?
     
  8. I haven't really looked at how Echostar figures into it. But I thought they operated as a separate entity now. In the business profile "Dish Network" isn't even mentioned nor Echostar mentioned in Dish's. :

    Earlier this year Dish acquired some assets and employees from Echostar and gave up Huges to Echostar. Both Dish and Echostar are separate public traded companies.
     
  9. In that TMUS is down about 14% since August, I'm not sure they're in a much better position in terms of inertia or that John is significantly better than Charlie at being a CEO. T-Mobile is a show in a four horse race.

    If the bandwidth that DISH has isn't particularly useful from a phone support standpoint, that's kind of a red herring too. I wonder if what DISH has is more IoT than conventional wireless bandwidth.

    Navychop has made much of the new bands but T-Mobile is deploying them in East Jesus rather than where population and skyscrapers are prevalent.
     
  10. I’d imagine T-Mobile will overtake Sprint in 2019, if not sooner.

    I’d love to see projected deployments of band 71 throughout 2018.
     
  11. Alas, unless you visit areas with populations of well under 75,000, you probably won't see any direct evidence if the current deployment plans are any indication.
     
  12. I don’t know why you think the first couple of areas were anything more than a test. It only makes sense to put signals where lots of folks will use them, and pay.
     
  13. There’s a lot of support for your rural thesis, with the exception of NYC and a few other cities, in this projected end of 2017 map:

    maps.spectrumgateway.com/t-mobile-600-MHz-band-71-deployment.html

    howmobileworks.com has more info

    There is a 39 month rollout plan.

    And yes, per PCMag Cheyenne and Scarborough were real world test sites selected as places that wouldn’t cause too much of a splash.
     
  14. Because the next half dozen or so are also sparsely populated?
    TMobile clearly isn't of the same mind. If they wanted to know how band 71 is going to work in urban areas, they'd surely be testing in urban areas and not in places where there aren't any high density population centers.

    I think they're looking at band 71 as a way to get signal to sparsely populated areas as the signal can travel farther but doesn't have the bandwidth to support higher densities.
     
  15. I agree there’s a lot of truth to that. But the area I’m most interested in IS rural. Near where 81 & 70 meet.
     
  16. Got to remember one thing: 600 and 700 penetrate buildings much better than higher frequencies. Therefore some urban areas would benefit. Hence, NYC.
     
  17. If they're going to limit their deployment to small towns, it doesn't matter what benefits the lower frequencies could offer in large cities. Unless they do a 180 on their announced deployment plans, you're probably lusting for something that simply isn't going to happen.
     
  18. They’re doing NYC and other urban areas now. Probably to fill in where building penetration is currently weak.
     
  19. According to whom?

    T-Mobile's list that they released last week in conjunction with the LG phone had no major metropolitan areas.
     
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