Why don't US TV networks have their own digital channels?

zeebre12

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Feb 25, 2015
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Why don't US TV networks like CBS, ABC, Fox, NBC, PBS and The CW have their own digital free to air channels like in the UK/Australia etc. In Australia in the last few years networks like Channel 9 have launched free digital channels like 9go, 9gem and only last year 9Life. All other networks have recently launched several new 'subchannels'. And the UK main channels like ITV have had free digital channels like ITV2/3/4/Be for the past 10/15 years.
 
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fred555

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Why don't US TV networks like CBS, ABC, Fox, NBC, PBS and The CW have their own digital free to air channels like in the UK/Australia etc. In Australia in the last few years networks like Channel 9 have launched free digital channels like 9go, 9gem and only last year 9Life. All other networks have recently launched several new 'subchannels'. And the UK main channels like ITV have had free digital channels like ITV2/3/4/Be for the past 10/15 years.

All the channels you mentioned are available to most for free using a simple antenna.
There are also many subchannels subordinate to the main network channel.
I find the subchannels more interesting as I never watch the main networks at all.

Most of the channels you mentioned can be found on Ku or C band satellite for free also.
It is a DIY type thing with no supporting entity however.

I do not pay for TV, I have an antenna supplying about 25 channels and C band and Ku dishes
supplying many many more.

To see what is available for free in the US over the air via antenna go here and plug in a zipcode:

http://titantv.com/

another good resource

http://tvfool.com/


To see what is available for free over satellite go here:

http://ftalistings.com

and here

http://sathint.com/
 

jegrant

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Aug 5, 2005
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PBS and ION do this - PBS has a "PBS Kids" channel and ION has "ION Life". NBC used to offer "NBC Weather Plus" but has since withdrawn it in favor of COZI TV which is part of NBC. ABC tried offering the "LiveWell Network" and it is now only on a handful of stations because it wasn't a big hit. CBS thought about offering a "CBS.2" channel but eventually scrapped it. They do offer "CBSN" which is a news channel only available online. PBS originally created a channel "PBS World" but it is now part of American Public Television and is just called "World".
 

Jim5506

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Mainly because the networks do not own most of the broadcast facilities, they are privately held by companies and individuals, each station is assigned a real channel (frequency) upon which to broadcast that must be alternated from DMA to DMA (DMA=designated marketing area) so as not to have co-channel or adjacent channel interference (although adjacent channel interference does not appear to be a problem with digital ATSC TV).
If all the NBC stations across the country broadcast on the same frequency, there would be areas between stations where the receiver would pick up both signals and be confused as hell. This overlapping is necessary to partially alleviate the problem of dead zones - which still exist, but we do our best.

Re-reading the OP's question, It looks like I misinterpreted what he asked, but It was a good answer, even if it was not the question - RIGHT??
 
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JosephB

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Dec 21, 2004
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The broadcast networks wouldn't even give away their network signals for free if they could get away with it. CBS seems dead set on eventually getting paid for every single viewer. The broadcast networks in the US are owned by huge media companies, who also own cable channels. Their second tier and reruns go to their cable channels, which make way more money than digital OTA subchannels

If you'll notice, the subchannel diginets are all owned by companies that own broadcast stations (which are different than the companies who own the networks CBS, ABC, Fox, NBC) and also co-owned by companies who own a lot of old content that isn't being played on cable anymore (MGM, etc)
 
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Tampa8

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Mainly because the networks do not own most of the broadcast facilities, they are privately held by companies and individuals, each station is assigned a real channel (frequency) upon which to broadcast that must be alternated from DMA to DMA (DMA=designated marketing area) so as not to have co-channel or adjacent channel interference (although adjacent channel interference does not appear to be a problem with digital ATSC TV).
If all the NBC stations across the country broadcast on the same frequency, there would be areas between stations where the receiver would pick up both signals and be confused as hell. This overlapping is necessary to partially alleviate the problem of dead zones - which still exist, but we do our best.

Re-reading the OP's question, It looks like I misinterpreted what he asked, but It was a good answer, even if it was not the question - RIGHT??

LMAO.
 

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