3D HDTV Channel for Direct TV in 2010

cpdretired

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Dec 6, 2003
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Will Dish also offer a 3D channel?

There will be no escape from 3D HDTV in 2010, with more broadcasters announcing the launch of a dedicated 3D TV channel.

In the US, Direct TV is just the latest broadcaster to announce that it will be launching a 3D TV channel in 2010.

The main thrust of 3D HDTV will come at the Consumers Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, which starts next week!

Last year, all of the major companies such as LG, Panasonic, Sony and Samsung had 3D HDTV panels on display, but the technology did not strike a chord.

This year, though, all the talk is of 3D and this technology is going to make its way into the homes of the consumer.

Currently it seems that broadcasters will be using a mix of 3D HDTV formats but, as time moves on, maybe only one format will come out on top.

http://www.techwatch.co.uk/2009/12/30/3d-hdtv-channel-for-direct-tv-in-2010/
 

MikeD-C05

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Well good luck with that. I don't think that the American people will embrace any , ANY new technology that will require them to buy new hd 3-d tvs , blu- ray 3-D dvd players and last of all wear Stupid glasses to watch tv . Especially since most just bought new hdtvs and blu-ray players in the last few years. NOT in this economy.
 

ryotgz

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I'm not so sure 3D at home will catch on. Like Mike said, I have no plans to go buy a new TV just for it and I am always looking at the next big thing to buy.
 

DodgerKing

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Nov 14, 2007
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This is probably more of a marketing tool than anything. Just something for Direct to say, "We have something that no other provider has."

With that said, why would you need a special TV? You can still watch HD on any TV with 3D glasses.
 

space86

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May 3, 2007
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I'm not so sure 3D at home will catch on. Like Mike said, I have no plans to go buy a new TV just for it and I am always looking at the next big thing to buy.
One good thing is that in 5 years when people go to replace
their HDTV, almost all new HDTV's by then will support the new 3D HDTV standard
 

whatchel1

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This is probably more of a marketing tool than anything. Just something for Direct to say, "We have something that no other provider has."

With that said, why would you need a special TV? You can still watch HD on any TV with 3D glasses.
YES and here is why. BTW no one is saying how much these jewels are going to cost but I would bet that the new LED sets will look cheap in comparison. This is a thumbnail sketch of the tech it takes. And wait in 2 years we will be looking at the upgrade to 4K HDTV (4096 x 2160 pixels) and probably 3D on top of that. Right now those cost more than any of the houses I have ever lived in for a projector.

How's It Work?

Panasonic's 3D stereoscopic system is electronic, so chuck those cardboard red-and-green glasses or those plastic polarized glasses you got when you went to see Up. The first Panasonic 3D HDTVs will be plasmas, the only sets with a fast enough refresh rate to accurately render a 3D image.

The dual-scan/dual-driver plasmas display alternate 1080p frames every 60th of a second, one set of frames mimicking what your left eye sees, the other set mimicking what your right eye sees; current HDTVs are single-scan so can't display alternating stereoscopic 1080p frames.

New 3D HDTVs will be equipped with emitters that transmit 120Hz control signals to special battery-powered glasses that, using microscopic "shutters," essentially merge the alternating stereoscopic 1080p frames the way your brain processes the image received from each of your eyes to create a true-to-live 3D HDTV image.

James Cameron's Avatar is shot using a twin-lensed system that mimics the way your two eyes see. High-def 2D camcorders, due in 2011, also are likely to use a dual-lens system.

The glasses themselves look like oversized sunglasses and comfortably fit over regular glasses. They'll be powered by a battery that will supply enough juice for 250 hours of 3D viewing. The glasses, likely to be manufactured by a number of companies, automatically turn themselves off when they don't detect signal from the emitters.
 

KKlare

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Nov 18, 2003
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Panasonic's 3D stereoscopic system is electronic, so chuck those cardboard red-and-green glasses or those plastic polarized glasses you got when you went to see Up. The first Panasonic 3D HDTVs will be plasmas, the only sets with a fast enough refresh rate to accurately render a 3D image.
Digital Light Projection (DLP) sets can do 3D, too. It uses synchronized shutter glasses. As DLP has no phosphors they are as fast as the frame rate although the 3D circuitry may half the refresh. Unfortunately DLPs are just about off the market because they are not thin enough. See the AVS boards.
-Ken
Owner of a Samsung HL-T5687 but have not spend $100+ on the (pair of?) glasses.
 

lparsons21

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I'm glad I bought my plasma this year because you can count me as one of those that very much doesn't like 3D. Or I should say, I don't like any of the 3D I've seen so far and I've seen a bit of it since the 50's.

And eventually if I have to get a set with 3D, if they haven't gotten rid of the glasses, then I'll make sure I don't tune in a 3D channel/source.
 

ekilgus

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Jan 22, 2007
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Digital Light Projection (DLP) sets can do 3D, too. It uses synchronized shutter glasses. As DLP has no phosphors they are as fast as the frame rate although the 3D circuitry may half the refresh. Unfortunately DLPs are just about off the market because they are not thin enough. See the AVS boards.
-Ken
Owner of a Samsung HL-T5687 but have not spend $100+ on the (pair of?) glasses.

Yes, DLP sets are already 3-D ready and it's true Samsung has abandoned their DLP line of TV's leaving Mitsubishi as the remaining provider of DLP sets. It's also true that they aren't as thin as LCD/Plasma but they provide huge and stunning pictures for much less money than LCD/Plasma. My sister's home theatre has a Mits 82 inch DLP set which is stunning to watch and cost a fraction of what an LCD set of around 70 inches whould cost.

For those who want the best picture bang for their bucks and don't mind a few more inches in set depth, DLP is the way to go.
 

gunn55

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Mar 24, 2004
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Mark Cudan already said he is working on set's that will not need the use of 3D glasses, but who know's when that will be.
I will not be suprised if he is the one with the first 3D channel as he was the first with an all HD channel.
 

Scott Greczkowski

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DIRECTV keeps telling me they will have no announcement being made at CES, but I am hearing Eric Shank is on his way to CES to make an announcement.

I am also hearing a number of TV makers will be using DIRECTV's 3D TV service for their demo material.
 

clapple

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Yes, DLP sets are already 3-D ready and it's true Samsung has abandoned their DLP line of TV's leaving Mitsubishi as the remaining provider of DLP sets. It's also true that they aren't as thin as LCD/Plasma but they provide huge and stunning pictures for much less money than LCD/Plasma. My sister's home theatre has a Mits 82 inch DLP set which is stunning to watch and cost a fraction of what an LCD set of around 70 inches whould cost.

For those who want the best picture bang for their bucks and don't mind a few more inches in set depth, DLP is the way to go.
As a former owner of a 73"Mit. DLP., i agree the picture was outstanding, WHEN IT WORKED! :mad:

Something called the "light engine" failed, and there were no parts to fix it. I will stay with my LCD. :)
 

old corps

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As a former owner of a 73"Mit. DLP., i agree the picture was outstanding, WHEN IT WORKED! :mad:

Something called the "light engine" failed, and there were no parts to fix it. I will stay with my LCD. :)
Jeeze, didn't wanna hear that......:( I've had my 73" Mitz for almost a year and LOVE it. I'd really like to make use of the 3D capablity it has. Sorry for your experience but hopefully for me you just got a lemon which every manufacturer makes. Had a CRT 65" HD Mitz before that for about 5 years, never a problem and now my son is using it.

Ed
 

whatchel1

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Reason I don't care for Sammy's

The major reason I'm not a fan of Sammy's is due to having worked with 3 of them at a TV station. All 3 after a while had to have the Light Engine replaced. The customer service for them was the worse I've ever had to work with. It was a good the the GM at the station had purchased an additional warranty. It was not covered by Sammy and the additional warranty did cover most of it. In fact it is the only time I've ever been glad to have the extended warranty.
 

ekilgus

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As a former owner of a 73"Mit. DLP., i agree the picture was outstanding, WHEN IT WORKED! :mad:

Something called the "light engine" failed, and there were no parts to fix it. I will stay with my LCD. :)
The Mits DLP has a fantastic picture, then when some component fails and you discover many Mitsubishi parts are on seemingly indefinite backorder, it is frustrating. This is why if Samsung would have remained in the DLP arena I would have gone with one of theirs since they employ LED's instead of a projector bulb and color wheel.
There is hope for these large DLP sets as I believe a couple of manufacturers will be unveiling 3-D capable DLP sets using lasers instead of projection bulb/color wheels or LED's. When, and how much? Who knows?
 

SQUEEZON

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Here in Oregon a small manufacturer is making thousands of new stereoscopic glasses with the circuitry built into the glasses. No change of HD television is required. The company is quietly working with Sony and provided the glasses to the Avatar set engineers who, with James Cameron and the producers held a closed door meeting with the top heads of Sony, Toshiba, Panasonic , LG and others. The glasses were finally approved for use only by the developers and engineers of Avatar. They are very thin,
and there are two other products underway to provide state of the art product which will
NOT use shutter technology. As an engineer I was able to see the product up close and
it does not compare to any "3D " glasses currently out there or coming to market.
A small box is used to translate signals to the television to complete the 3D effect
 

DishSubLA

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Apr 9, 2006
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Exactly! This is analogous to the Stereo home systems quickly followed by quadraphonic sound, the forerunner to today's multi-channel sound systems such as 5.1, etc. Why didn't the public embrace the clearly superior 4 channel quad sound way back in the early 1970's? Because Quadraphonic sound systems came way too soon after many people had sunk money into 2 channel Stereo systems. People are not going to go out and buy a significantly more expensive display that requires wearing stupid glasses (such as the best 3D format requires) after already having purchased, in many cases more than 1 HDTV for the home, and if we look at the fact that Vizio is the biggest selling HDTV brand, quality is NOT at the top of the average consumers' list of desires when purchasing a display. People aren't going to spend loads of money to make their current, expensive--still paying for on the credit card?--set-up obsolete. People will pretend that 3D just doesn't exist. It's CHEAPER that way.

It's bad enough that now many people I know have expressed exasperation at the fact their voluminous DVD collection is sh*t compared to Blu-ray and somewhat begrudgingly upgrade to Blu-ray because they want the most out of the HD display they just bought. And, uh, oh, yeah. People are plenty pissed that Blu-ray movies are more expensive than DVD's were. Not everyone views the latest technology with kiddie glee that some have, but with an ironic sense of dread thinking, "how much is this new stuff gonna cost me." People's pocketbooks won't be ready for 3D for at least 10 years, when they will have got it right and without stupid glasses.
 

Z06_Pilot

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Oct 11, 2009
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Jeeze, didn't wanna hear that......:( I've had my 73" Mitz for almost a year and LOVE it. I'd really like to make use of the 3D capablity it has. Sorry for your experience but hopefully for me you just got a lemon which every manufacturer makes. Had a CRT 65" HD Mitz before that for about 5 years, never a problem and now my son is using it.

Ed
I agree, I have a 73" Mits DLP as wel and would love to take advantage of 3d capability. the new 3d technologies are fantastic.

and I agree with your comments on the 73" Mits. there is no where in the world you can get a HD picture that looks that good, on a screen that size, for $3,000. just not possible. yea, it had some quirks, and I had to call the techs. out a couple of times, but I always buy a 5 year warranty on any big screen TV, and I am willing to put up with a few service calls for an HD picture this big...
 

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