Audio and Signal Meter Questions - Phillips 55" 4K

Discussion in 'Television Sets and Projectors' started by Jason S, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. Jason S

    Jason S Topic Starter Ordinary Average Guy...
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    Phillips 55" 4K - 55PFL5601/F7

    Purchased the set on closeout last summer prior to moving. It was hooked up to the FTA satellite setup for a couple of months before the move (no OTA at previous location).

    First, noticed the audio was "different" than the 10 or 11 year old Sony that it replaced. Speakers aren't bad, just not what I was used to hearing. I've tried the 'wall mount' versus 'pedestal mount' settings and had no real change. I presume this is just the difference between the Sony and the Phillips, correct?

    Secondly, connected the OTA antenna and scanned in the expected channels just fine. I've looked through the manual and the TV menus and cannot find any sort of signal meter. Is there a signal meter buried in a menu option or is it just absent?
     
  2. waylew

    waylew SatelliteGuys Pro

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    Signal meter;
    Look under product support,that's where it's buried on my Sony and some newer Samsungs I've messed with.
     
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  3. Jason S

    Jason S Topic Starter Ordinary Average Guy...
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    Thanks for the reply Waylew. I had checked for something like that as it was a Sony that was replaced, but didn't see anything of the sort.

    Also, it seems the Phillips has only a full scan option for channels without an option to scan only for new channels.
     
  4. waylew

    waylew SatelliteGuys Pro

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    On the Samsungs I found that if you enter the actual tv channel (not the virtual channel),they will scan in the digitals for that channel.You of course need to know the actual rf channel to do it.
    Just did a little quick googling,according to Phillips,press the "options" button and you should see some sort of meter.Whether that applies to your set or not I don't know.
     
  5. Jason S

    Jason S Topic Starter Ordinary Average Guy...
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    Caught a mistake I made with this post... Philips, not Phillips.

    No luck on a built in signal meter. It's not convenient, but I have an external decoder box that I can hook up to check signal strength.

    As for the audio, I'm considering adding a sound bar to see if that gives any improvement.

    I think this one will do the same. Thanks again for the input!
     
  6. harshness

    harshness SatelliteGuys Master

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    The speakers are bad. Don't sell your ears short.

    Your new TV probably has speakers that are no more than 1/2" deep (including the frame and magnet). Your old TV probably had something closer to what you would find in a car stereo system.

    In general, flat screen sound is not great. The high-end TVs may have some rather special audio wizardry built in, but the cheap TVs are perhaps a couple steps above an pocket AM radio as there's just no room in there for a speaker that can travel.
     
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  7. Jason S

    Jason S Topic Starter Ordinary Average Guy...
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    Yeah. The built-in speakers on this Philips are pretty deficient.

    Connected some old Dell speakers with powered sub-woofer into the headphone output and heard a definite improvement.
     
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  8. Foxbat

    Foxbat Addicted to new HW
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    I used to have a cheapie $15 Computer Audio satellite speaker w/subwoofer connected to my flat panel in the bedroom. Unfortunately, it's shielding sucked and would easily play the audio from our nearby AM radio transmitter under the TV audio. I ended up with a Sony speaker box that sits under the TV (since the sound bars I tried earlier blocked the IR receiver on the TV). Since no one can sell an unintelligent device, I've had times where the TV and sound system got "out of synch" and I've had to power-cycle either the TV or the sound system.
     
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  9. Jason S

    Jason S Topic Starter Ordinary Average Guy...
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    I think something like the Sony box you describe might be what I ultimately need (or build a little platform for TV to sit above a soundbar).

    Tried a new Sony sound bar with this TV and it integrated nicely. However it blocked the sensor (as in your case). Returned the Sony sound bar today and got to looking at the new TV's. It seems they're all leg mounted versus central pedestal mounted and can accommodate a sound bar.

    Continuing on - Got my old, old Bose 3-2-1 to work with the TV through a digital optical cable (no HDMI with the Bose). Have to mute the TV speaker because the onboard speakers and Bose don't sync. Very limited on hookup options to an older sound system. I think for now, this setup will work until we get a little more settled in the house.
     
  10. harshness

    harshness SatelliteGuys Master

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    It turned out that the pedestal mounts we just too tippy and caused a lot of children and pets to be clobbered. I have the same lament as I'm using a microwave cart as an entertainment rack at the vacation spot.

    A compact stereo system or boom box connected via RCA jacks may be your best shot if your TV has them. Back in the day, most TVs would allow you to tie the output level of the jacks to the TV volume control. I don't know if that's still the case, but it would get you good-enough stereo sound that wasn't subject to digital audio delays.

    Unfortunately, the headphone jack seems to have gone the way of the goony bird.
     
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