Compatable router for VIP722k (1 Viewer)

MarcB

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What would be a good router for A VIP722k? I had a a westell combination modem/wireless router when I had fairpoint dsl. I now have TW roadrunner and am looking for a wireless router. I had the westell directly hooked to the 722k with an ethernet cable and will most likely do the same with the new one. I do have a sling adapter that was working well with the dsl and was hoping for the same with new router. Anybody have any to stay away from? Was looking at a Belkin N300, also had good luck with a basic netgear before I had dish. TIA for help.
 

whatchel1

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Sep 30, 2006
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What would be a good router for A VIP722k? I had a a westell combination modem/wireless router when I had fairpoint dsl. I now have TW roadrunner and am looking for a wireless router. I had the westell directly hooked to the 722k with an ethernet cable and will most likely do the same with the new one. I do have a sling adapter that was working well with the dsl and was hoping for the same with new router. Anybody have any to stay away from? Was looking at a Belkin N300, also had good luck with a basic netgear before I had dish. TIA for help.
I've used it w/several and the only one I every had trouble with was a netgear. But I may have just had a lemon.
 

TheKrell

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Magic Static

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I upgraded to gigabit LAN using Linksys switches and router. I have the 722k hooked to it, also the slingbox.
 

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tedb3rd

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I've got a Cadlepoint router (at home with 722) now and that works without problems. I've never had any issues (except for lighting strikes, but that fries anything) with Netgear equipment (used at work). For some time, I used Belkin router at home but it sucked.
 

Straybeat

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I think as long as you stick to a good brand, D-link, Linksys, Belkin, Netgear, etc. you shouldn't any troubles. All routers have their own set of problems to deal with (or none at all) and if you get a "bad" one then you're stuck with constant reboots and that sort of thing. Personally I have owned them all at one time or another and never really had any issues with any, except one Belkin that constantly rebooted when it was new, then settled down and it was fine forever more. Currently I'm running the Netgear WNDR3700 dual band, dual radio for the 2.4 and 5GHz "N" protocol at 300Mbps, but the new ones are starting to come out at 450 or 900Mbps with 6 antennas for extended range.
 

Jim5506

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By all means do not buy the cheapest model of whatever brand you select, step up a couple of tiers and buy quality from a major manufacturer (Cisco/Linksys, Netgear, etc.).

I first bought major mfrs but cheapest models and after going through 3 or 4 (one from each) I went for a better model and it has lasted much longer than any of the first ones.
 

TG2

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I second not buying the cheapest... but one thing I also *STRONGLY* recommend.. is that you look at its specs using the Router Database link on DD-WRT.com

if a router has less than 8 megs of flash, and 16 megs of ram .. its not worth extra money ... if a router has 8 megs of flash, 32 megs of ram .... it should perform better for you than a model with half the ram.

And also checking it on DD-WRT if it says its supported, you have an alternative firmware option.

Now cost being a guide ... I like my little Buffalo WHR-G300N's ... though they are single band (2.4GHz) they do N, and they have 8/32 and were only FORTY BUCKS !!! :) (newegg.com)

you'll pay more for simultaneous dual band (2.4 / 5 GHz) and that can be a great benefit to you and higher throughput.
 

Magic Static

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Which Linksys Router is that? e1000 e2000 e3000? (or e2100L) :D
It's an E2000. I looked at the E3000 but it had features I didn't want.

I miss my Tomato OS though on the old WRT54G
 
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king3pj

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I upgraded to gigabit LAN using Linksys switches and router. I have the 722k hooked to it, also the slingbox.

That's a lot of cabling. I just have an old D Link wireless G router that I have had forever. The only ethernet cables connected to it are the WAN port from the cable modem, my Vonage box, and the Dish powerline adapter. We have 5 computers, my Xbox 360, bluray player, and our cell phones connected to it through wireless and everything seems to be pretty solid. The Xbox works great on Live and the bluray player streams HD fine from Netflix and Vudu.

I would like to run ethernet to my 722k though. The powerline adapter just doesn't work well in my house. I'm not sure if it's our wiring or the powerline adapter itself. The only thing I miss about cable is the on demand. I have tried to use it from dish several times and it says I have to wait like 5 hours or even longer sometimes to start watching. There is nothing on demand about that. I have Charter cable internet 16/1 service.

Would running ethernet to the receiver significantly reduce the download time or is that just how on demand works with Dish?
 

TheKrell

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I have Cox 15/5 service which is usually more like 30/4, and a Gigabit Ethernet network throughout the house. I too see very low download speeds from Dish On Demand.
 

mmcl26554

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Feb 18, 2006
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First of all I would suggest a separate modem and router and access point. That way if any of them go south you only have to replace it. However, this does make for many extra cables and power supplies. I have found routers don't last much longer than 1-2 years and the name brands are no better. The last router I bought at Amazon for $15 and it works fine, for now and it is not a name brand. Access points seem to last much longer and I have never had to replace a modem. Unless you move a lot of data between computers on your own network there is no value in having an access point faster than 54meg. and they are a lot cheaper than the faster ones.
Michael
 

TG2

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Well mixed B/G networks suffer seriously when you have a B equipment in them, slowing G devices down. So that's an issue .. and 11 mega bit doesn't stand a chance when trying to stream 8 megs in a Sling Adapter connection, *and* with a wireless network connection, etc..

In my network I have a separate network just for my "connecteds" ... devices that connect across my wireless "N only" bridge; like the 722's, 211's, bluray, Networked AV receiver, etc , then the rest of the PC's, wifi phones, and wireless printers connect to the main gateway router's wireless with mixed N/G. That way I have nothing really causing a problem for any other computer or device on either network.
 

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