Direct Burial RG6 Source (1 Viewer)

red hazard

Thread Starter
Supporting Founder
Supporting Founder
Oct 13, 2003
557
7
St Louis Metro East (Illinois)
Where can I get 100 ft of quality single direct burial RG6. I found one source of Belden 1829BC but they only sell it in 1000 ft rolls. CommScope 5789 appears to be similar in specifications but is a dual cable which I do not need.
Any other brands with similar specs out there that are sold in 100ft lengths.

Thanks
 

retiredTech

SatelliteGuys Pro
Nov 15, 2003
246
0
Missouri
I've had standard RG6 buried for years without a problem, but to extend the life
use pcv pipe to thread your RG6 through the ground or even "garden hose".
 

Mainstreet

Satellite Guru
Supporting Founder
Oct 4, 2003
281
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Texas
red hazard said:
Where can I get 100 ft of quality single direct burial RG6. I found one source of Belden 1829BC but they only sell it in 1000 ft rolls. CommScope 5789 appears to be similar in specifications but is a dual cable which I do not need.
Any other brands with similar specs out there that are sold in 100ft lengths.

Thanks

I have some that I would sell in a 100ft length. It is Commscope 5728 Direct Burial RG6.

I can even crimp on the Gilbert GFUS-6 compression connectors if you like.

Let me know: mainstreet@checkyes.tv
 

Mike500

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 7, 2003
1,338
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Thiepval
Send me an IM. I have Commscope "direct burial cable." I can cut a 100ft length off of a 1000 ft spool. It is seldom sold by the foot. I am a professional "high end" installer and use it. This stuff is "flooded" and has a tough cross linked high density polyethelene waterproof jacket. It's design life is 25 years plus.
 

Mainstreet

Satellite Guru
Supporting Founder
Oct 4, 2003
281
0
Texas
retiredTech said:
I've had standard RG6 buried for years without a problem, but to extend the life
use pcv pipe to thread your RG6 through the ground or even "garden hose".

The problem with that is the fact that either one of those hold water against the cable. Invariably, when I have had to replace cable that has been ran in buried conduit, no matter how well they tried to seal the point of entry, there is water standing somewhere in the pipe. It ends up being the equivalent of running the cable through a pool.
 

jimisham

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 31, 2004
170
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Mainstreet said:
The problem with that is the fact that either one of those hold water against the cable. Invariably, when I have had to replace cable that has been ran in buried conduit, no matter how well they tried to seal the point of entry, there is water standing somewhere in the pipe. It ends up being the equivalent of running the cable through a pool.

That's the problem I've run into. I've got conduit that was installed about 20 years ago when I had the big dish. When I replaced it with a small dish I discovered there was water in the conduit. I can blow it out but it just accumulates again. So far it doesn't seem to be a problem but I'm sure it's only a matter of time.
 

Mike500

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 7, 2003
1,338
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Thiepval
A standard industry practice is to use "waterproof" direct burial cable in a flexible polyethylene pipe, since polyethylene has much better protection against acid attack from the tips of pant and tree roots.

Polyethylene jacketed cable has the longest life in direct burial conditions. When encased in conduit, the vinyl jacketed "direct burial' cable to preferred, as it is easier to handle around bends.

The industry prefers "high density polyethylene" flexible conduit to rigid PVC, since it is seamless and less likely to leak. It can be thinner material, since is is more acid and tree/plant root resistant. It is readily available to us and cheap, at Lowes as black polyethylene water pipe. $10 for 100 ft of 3/4 inch.

Using polyethylene, also allows for easy replacedment of the cables.
 

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