Dish System Setup Question

zippyfrog

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Dec 27, 2007
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General Dish setup question. I have two VIP211k's on my Dish setup. I have two coax cables coming from the LNBF, one coax goes to the first VIP211k, the second coax goes to the 2nd VIP211k. So in essence, the VIP211k's are directly connected to the LNBF. There are no switches or splitters or anything along the way. Does the VIP211k receivers send power back through the coax to power-up the LNBF? Basically power over coax?
 
General Dish setup question. I have two VIP211k's on my Dish setup. I have two coax cables coming from the LNBF, one coax goes to the first VIP211k, the second coax goes to the 2nd VIP211k. So in essence, the VIP211k's are directly connected to the LNBF. There are no switches or splitters or anything along the way. Does the VIP211k receivers send power back through the coax to power-up the LNBF? Basically power over coax?
Yes, how else would they get power and digital signals?
 
It sounds like simple confusion given the proliferation of switching configurations used on systems. If a switch would be used that is in itself powered, like the old SW64, then there'd be no need for receivers to output LNBF power on the coax. In the early DiSH days, the coax output shifted between 13 and 18v to signal the LNBF to switch polarities. That need was done away with by stacking frequencies in the "DP" LNBFs. All LNBFs at the dish require power present on the signal coax, and this almost always comes from the receivers, either directly or through an in-line switch, such as would be used with multiple dishes/LNBFs.
 
Thanks - that is what I was wondering. I had to do some work around the house, and I needed to extend the coax run by about 10 feet. The only coax I had laying around was a 100 foot long run, and I just threw that on. But I realized that I completely lost signal, so it made me think that power was going through the coax because the run was too long and not powering the LNBF.
 
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Thanks - that is what I was wondering. I had to do some work around the house, and I needed to extend the coax run by about 10 feet. The only coax I had laying around was a 100 foot long run, and I just threw that on. But I realized that I completely lost signal, so it made me think that power was going through the coax because the run was too long and not powering the LNBF.
It may the barrel connector you used as well. You need the high frequency type to pass the satellite signals. They will have the blue ends.

Amazon product ASIN B0B9YQ5749
View: https://www.amazon.com/SatelliteSale-High-Frequency-Coaxial-Connectors-Adapter/dp/B0B9YQ5749/ref=sr_1_15?crid=3KKO5EX2TC31I&keywords=barrel%2Bconnectors%2Bsatellite&qid=1698590933&sprefix=%2Caps%2C143&sr=8-15&th=1
 
Yeah - I fixed that.

One more question - is there the equivalent of a PoE injector that Dish manufactures that could be added between two coax connections that would send power to the LNBF so that it isn't relying on the power from the receiver? I see the old switches mentioned above, but is there anything used now a days?
 
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Yeah - I fixed that.

One more question - is there the equivalent of a PoE injector that Dish manufactures that could be added between two coax connections that would send power to the LNBF so that it isn't relying on the power from the receiver? I see the old switches mentioned above, but is there anything used now a days?
I had a receiver quit sending power once and didn't have a replacement so I added a power inserter that's intended for a switch and it worked. But it may or may not work in every situation.