Hopper3 LAN issues with DHCP, APIPA, and Upper Ethernet Port

Discussion in 'DISH Network Support Forum' started by JJinVista, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. JJinVista

    JJinVista Topic Starter SatelliteGuys Family

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Posts:
    67
    Likes Received:
    27
    Ever since getting the Hopper3 over a year ago, I've put up with a periodic loss of connection to the internet. So this past weekend I did some troubleshooting and found out some interesting facts, at least for my setup.

    I have a Hopper3 with a hardwired ethernet connection to my router and 1 Joey with a MoCA connection to the Hopper3.

    The symptoms are: approximately 1 out of every 3 or 4 days, I find my Hopper with no internet connection. The Settings / Internet screen shows its not connected to my router nor internet.

    The reason it's not connected is because the Hopper isn't successful in getting a valid address from my router / DHCP Server. So the Hopper is falling back to an APIPA address. (APIPA is an obscure standard for LAN devices to connect when there's no DHCP server. An address in the range 169.254.*.* is generated by the device). For whatever reason, the Hopper gives up on the DHCP server and uses this APIPA address which places the Hopper in its own little world with nobody on the LAN to talk to except the Joey.

    I found that I can simulate this 3 or 4 day cycle by doing a "Reset Network". Every 3rd or 4th Reset, the Hopper decides to use an APIPA address. Sometimes it stays in this state for a couple of resets, but overall it fails to get a real DHCP address around 30% of the time.

    I believe that when my Hopper does it's automatic "Daily Reset", it is cycling through this same pattern. When I'm off on a trip and try to use Dish Anywhere to access my home setup and it fails because my Hopper isn't connected, it will reconnect automagically in the next day or two.

    Hopper Fix:
    My Ethernet cable was plugged into the Upper ethernet port. I changed it to the lower port, and now every "Reset Network" command results in a valid DHCP-assigned IP address and a valid router / internet connection. (I did about 20 in a row).

    The lower Ethernet port has a logical (Client) name of Hopper3-ETH0; the upper port is Hopper3-ETH1.

    Are these ports supposed to be interchangable, and why are there two of them - maybe for use as a pass-thru for a second device in the area which needs a LAN connection? I don't think this is a hardware problem with my upper Ethernet port. The pattern is too predictable. I think it has something to do with the lower port having a lower logical Client name of -ETH0 than the upper -ETH1. Perhaps the firmware first tries to establish a connection in the sequence of the Client name interfaces, so when the first port it tries isn't the one being used, something times out or sets an error condition by mistake and it gums up the works for the valid port.

    Joey Problem:
    Although this fixed the APIPA problem for my Hopper, not so for the Joey. Every other time I did a "Reset Network" for the Joey, it generated a APIPA address. Worse yet, when it didn't use an APIPA address, it would hang on to an old DHCP address previously assigned by the DHCP server, even when the router / server had been reset and that was no longer it's assigned address!

    I could eventually "force" the Joey's valid DHCP-assigned address through the Hopper and on to the Joey with a number of resets of both boxes, power-downs, cable unplugs etc. but these boxes should be robust and self-configuring!

    Final Solution:
    I set up fixed IP addresses for the devices. It turns out there are four MAC addresses in my setup:
    Hopper3-br
    Hopper3-ETH0 (lower port)
    Hopper3-ETH1 (upper port which I'm no longer using)
    Joey_MoCA
    I defined the three that I'm using in my router's setup, and after a few "Reset Network"s on both the Hopper and Joey, unplugging and plugging network cables, both the Hopper and Joey consistently come back to their assigned fixed IP LAN addresses.

    For my setup, it took both actions to fix the problem:
    - Avoiding use of the Hopper's top Ethernet port
    - Assigning fixed IP addresses

    Meanwhile through all of these router resets, the other dozen connected devices (wireless and wired) in my home were perfectly happy having an IP address assigned to them by my DHCP server and running with it.
    :coco

    BTW, I thought I read in these forums that there was a "hidden" dialog / screen on the Hopper3 setup whereby you could assign a fixed IP address on the Hopper side. The fixed addresses I've assigned were done on the router side with the corresponding MAC addresses pointing to the Hopper's devices, which seems to be working OK.
     
  2. Partysox

    Partysox SatelliteGuys Pro
    Pub Member / Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Posts:
    1,652
    Likes Received:
    701
    Location:
    N central Indiana
    The reason for 2 ethernet ports is 1 for internet and 1 for the access point for a wireless joey.
     
    JSheridan and charlesrshell like this.
  3. HipKat

    HipKat SatelliteGuys Pro
    Pub Member / Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2017
    Posts:
    4,337
    Likes Received:
    6,934
    Location:
    Pekin, IL
    There is a hidden screen where you can manually set DNS, et al, but I can't remember how to get to it. On Commercial jobs for Movie Theaters, we have to input the server's info so they can stream live events back through the Hopper and it's been over a year and I just cannot remember that key combo to get to it.

    However, your problem is not unique and it's why I try to use a Hopper Internet Connector (HIC) whenever i can
     
    charlesrshell likes this.
  4. Claude Greiner

    Claude Greiner SatelliteGuys Master
    Supporting Founder

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2003
    Posts:
    11,693
    Likes Received:
    2,673
    Location:
    Detroit - The Paris of the Midwest
    Could be a crappy router not properly assigning DHCP also.

    It happens more often when there are dozens of devices on the network.

    However manually assigning the IP address can work also
     
  5. BradleyD

    BradleyD SatelliteGuys Family

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Posts:
    87
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Knoxville, TN
    I had a very similar issue with my H3 and a Joey2. The problem was solved in my case by taking them off a secondary vlan and placing them back on the main vlan. I had chosen to place them on a separate vlan because of the problems with the hacking of IoT equipment and placing Dish on a vlan that cannot connect to other vlans can help prevent attacks on other equipment (PCs, servers, etc.) if an attack occurs. That being said, Dish equipment is probably more safeguarded than many other IoT devices because there is no open port to the outside for threats to enter. From what I understand, the H3 contacts Dish and DishAnywhere on a device out in the world contacts Dish which connects it to the H3. Still, I would like to isolate the Dish equipment. I also want to add my TV and sound bar and a couuple more devices to the isolated vlan at some point. Haven't done that yet because I have to be able to google cast to them. I have read that it can be done (avahi, iptables, etc.), but haven't tried it yet.

    Don't know if it was a Dish firmware upgrade that caused it because the problem did not happen at a time right after a new firmware upgrade from what I can tell. I had it that way for probably around 2 and it worked great. Having the Dish equipment on the same vlan has been working for about 3 weeks, but I want it back like it was. Need to get working on that.

    Using static dhcp addresses was something I was going to try. I have been using eth1 and briefly thought about using the the other ethernet port so I will try all of those.

    Your information is very helpful. Thanks.
     
  6. charlesrshell

    charlesrshell SatelliteGuys Crazy
    Pub Member / Supporter Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Posts:
    7,583
    Likes Received:
    2,516
    Location:
    O'Fallon, IL 62269
    I have never had any Internet issues using either Hopper upper or lower Ethernet ports connected to my router. I use the DHCP Reservations in my router for my Hoppers and Joeys. I think it is easier than using static IP method.
     
  7. Tony S

    Tony S SatelliteGuys Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2003
    Posts:
    1,333
    Likes Received:
    668
    Location:
    Hills of Eastern CT
    Like charlesrshell, also use the address reservation feature of my router to define the IP addresses that are assigned to my devices. That has worked well with my Hopper.
     
    charlesrshell likes this.
  8. BradleyD

    BradleyD SatelliteGuys Family

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Posts:
    87
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Knoxville, TN
    I should have been clearer. My plan is to reserve dhcp IPs on the router for the Dish equipment. I called it static, but should have used a term like static DHCP (address reservation).

    It would be interesting to see that hidden menu with info for DNS that Hipkat mentioned.
     
    charlesrshell and TheKrell like this.
  9. JJinVista

    JJinVista Topic Starter SatelliteGuys Family

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Posts:
    67
    Likes Received:
    27
    Now that I understand the difference between the two, it turns out I mispoke. I'm also using DHCP Reservations in my router.

    (Static IP is when you use the device, in this case the Hopper3, to set the IP address).

    Thank you for the clarification!
     
    charlesrshell likes this.

Separate names with a comma.

More...