How do 3D TV's Compare to the 3D at the movie theater? (1 Viewer)

PKII

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How do 3D TV's Compare to the 3D at the movie theater?

I haven't looked at any 3D TV's yet. I was just wanting to know is it the same 3D that is seen in a movie theater? I was under the impression to see 3D like in a theater the image had to be projected.

Or is this 3D comparable to the old Red and Blue glasses? :confused:
 

JAG72

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Feb 16, 2006
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I have never been to the theater to see 3D but the TV's are no where close to the old red and blue glasses. It is miles better than any home 3D has ever been.
 

PKII

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I have never been to the theater to see 3D but the TV's are no where close to the old red and blue glasses. It is miles better than any home 3D has ever been.

So for example if an axe is flying towards the screen at me will I duck out of the way? :)
 

TheForce

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What I see comparing the two is that in the theater, the screen image is not as bright and often soft as compared to my 110" FP playing the 3D BD same movie as I saw in the theater. Obviously the movie theater screen is bigger but I prefer the screen size ratio I have at home. In an IMAX theater, I find I need to sit near the back of the theater so I am at near center of the screen in elevation and don't need to strain looking up all the time.

Specifically, 3D movies will mostly exhibit positive parallax ( depth away from the screen behind) and to a much lessor extent, negative parallax or what people call popout into your room between you and the screen. There is a consensus that too much negative parallax is a source for increase headaches in some people so its use is infrequent as opposed to positive parallax behind the screen image illusion.
 

PKII

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Are the glasses you need to watch the same as the ones used at a theater?

I wear glasses and when I go to a theater its sort of awkward to wear 2 pairs of glasses. It would be nice if they had clip on any of those out there? Or just the standard type?
 

Stalker

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Apr 21, 2004
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Are the glasses you need to watch the same as the ones used at a theater?

I wear glasses and when I go to a theater its sort of awkward to wear 2 pairs of glasses. It would be nice if they had clip on any of those out there? Or just the standard type?

The glasses that came with my Samsung fit very easily over my prescription glasses so much in fact they are not bothersome at all. The even look cool. I only stepped up to 3D tv cause the price was right on the one I got. Im still convinced this will always be a fad that comes and goes every few years.
 

TheForce

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They had a setup at CES, I haven't heard much more about them Linda ... I would be interested. :)

Easy to do. Go to your optician and select a set of light weight plastic lenses that are shaped close to the inside of the 3D glasses frames. Then use a couple of dabs of silicone RTV to mount them to the frames on the inside. Now you have prescription 3D glasses. Make sure the silicone is fully cured for several days before putting them on as the gas coming off the rubber during the curing will burn your eyes. When the RTV no longer smells like vinegar, it will be safe to wear.
 

Pepper

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The glasses in the theatre are non-powered polarized lenses. Each side only lets in light of a particular polarity, where both are being reflected from the screen simultaneously.

The glasses at home are typically an active alternate-shutter type that require power and an emitter on the TV to control them. Alternate left and right frames on the screen are filtered by the glasses so each frame is seen only by one eye. If you're extremely sensitive to flicker, might cause headaches.
 

PKII

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The glasses in the theatre are non-powered polarized lenses. Each side only lets in light of a particular polarity, where both are being reflected from the screen simultaneously.

The glasses at home are typically an active alternate-shutter type that require power and an emitter on the TV to control them. Alternate left and right frames on the screen are filtered by the glasses so each frame is seen only by one eye. If you're extremely sensitive to flicker, might cause headaches.

What powers them? Battery, rechargeable? extension cord to the TV? Wireless? I need to go to Best Buy and see one in person. :)
 

tnsprin

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Sep 27, 2003
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What powers them? Battery, rechargeable? extension cord to the TV? Wireless? I need to go to Best Buy and see one in person. :)
Battery and rechageables are available for most sets with Active Shuttter glasses. As mentioned a few companies offer sets that essentially can use the same type glasses as used in theatres. Very rare and very expensive are some that don't use any glasses.
 

21st Hermit

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Nov 26, 2005
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What I see comparing the two is that in the theater, the screen image is not as bright and often soft as compared to my 110" FP playing the 3D BD same movie as I saw in the theater.
110" is mighty big and I'm thinking 47", maybe 55" LCD. I currently have a 36" 4:3 SD, CRT. I'm assuming to do FP you need a dark room, not sunlight streaming in like I have? Does 3D even make sense in my situation?

Obviously the movie theater screen is bigger but I prefer the screen size ratio I have at home. In an IMAX theater, I find I need to sit near the back of the theater so I am at near center of the screen in elevation and don't need to strain looking up all the time.
Sure enough, wish I'd arrived at the Imax a half-hour earlier.

Specifically, 3D movies will mostly exhibit positive parallax ( depth away from the screen behind) and to a much lessor extent, negative parallax or what people call popout into your room between you and the screen. There is a consensus that too much negative parallax is a source for increase headaches in some people so its use is infrequent as opposed to positive parallax behind the screen image illusion.
That was quite helpful. When I saw Avatar in Imax 3D, all I remember was the negative parallax, as I always had the illusion of objects/people behind me. Didn't know otherwise. If I understand correctly, most TV based 3D will be positive parallax, for depth?
 

jvc

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Sep 25, 2004
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I've seen about all the brands and models of 3D tvs. Most are ok. But, I was in Best Buy a few weeks ago, and saw the best 3D I've seen yet, on a home setup. I told the salesman that it was the closest thing I'd seen to the 3D of Avatar at the iMax, and that was outstanding! This setup was a 47" LG 3D tv (LED, I think), 3D blu ray player (guessing it was LG too), and the glasses were passive glasses (no batteries). It was really outstanding for a home setup. At the time, the tv, player and 4 pair of passive glasses was $999. If you have a Best Buy nearby, see if they have this setup for demo. That promo is probably over by now though.

I'm not usually an LG fan, but that demo blew me away.
 

21st Hermit

SatelliteGuys Guru
Nov 26, 2005
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Colorado
I've seen about all the brands and models of 3D tvs. Most are ok. But, I was in Best Buy a few weeks ago, and saw the best 3D I've seen yet, on a home setup. I told the salesman that it was the closest thing I'd seen to the 3D of Avatar at the iMax, and that was outstanding! This setup was a 47" LG 3D tv (LED, I think), 3D blu ray player (guessing it was LG too), and the glasses were passive glasses (no batteries). It was really outstanding for a home setup. At the time, the tv, player and 4 pair of passive glasses was $999. If you have a Best Buy nearby, see if they have this setup for demo. That promo is probably over by now though.

I'm not usually an LG fan, but that demo blew me away.
Perhaps this LG/Blueray/3D Glasses Combo?

The reviews mirror your comments. I particularly like the power consumption (62 watts) and the SD to HD conversion.

Thanks for your reply. :)
 

Pepper

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Now that I've got one of the LG passive systems in my house, I can say that watching a 3D-BD compares favorably to the Real-D theatre experience, minus of course the nasty popcorn, talking strangers and crying babies.
 

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