Installing Joeys using Cat 5 instead of Coax

John Kotches

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Nov 21, 2003
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I highly doubt that Dish will be shutting off Ethernet/WiFi on the Joeys. Not allowed to say why, but lets just say that I'm 99% sure that it won't happen.

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I don't think they will either but since its "unsupported land", it's a possibility.




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John Kotches

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Nov 21, 2003
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Troy, IL (STL Area)
Egad. This may be true, and there are adapters to do just that. But in my home, I just went with the pure play of GigE throughout.

Right. I have the same setup.

Each room goes to a 24 port backbone at Gig. Next is to replace it with a basic managed switch so I can do link aggregation in a few spots.


Are you serious? You probably know 10X what a Dish "by the rules" tech knows, license or not! How is this going out on a limb when you know what you're doing? Besides, there's an adventure component to pushing the envelope. ;) But GigE or wireless is hardly going out on a limb, IMHO.

I don't get paid 10x what they do ;)

I would never use wifi fit this unless there was no other option, as there are too many things out of my control to go wrong. Reliability is the biggest thing for me.


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Barry Erick

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Aug 27, 2004
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Dallas
I had a licenesed electrician tell me once that no current flows in the neutral line. Only in the hot line. Thesde are they guys smarter than the average joe. And it was at work because you needed to hire licensed guys in the city to do electral work. Non-licensed employees could not (even though, back then, the entire staff was licensed in working with high powered transmitters by the federal government). At one time the state of PA wanted to limit broadcasters to only licensed electritions. They'd be confused as dc current runs in the opposite direction for them. Not all electricians fall into this one mind group, though.
 

John Kotches

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Nov 21, 2003
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Troy, IL (STL Area)
Barry:

I know it varies, in many places low voltage wiring (cat 5 and coax are in this category) requires no licensing at all.



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Smwoodward

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 6, 2013
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Alabama
Barry:

I know it varies, in many places low voltage wiring (cat 5 and coax are in this category) requires no licensing at all.


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Agreed, here we are not required to be licensed to run low voltage lines (cat 5/6, coax, phone line). Unless it's a building code requirement which sounds crazy to me to require it.
 

Claude Greiner

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Sep 8, 2003
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The coax is required because its what the installers have in the truck. They do not want all these non standard installations out there that they cannot trouble shoot over the phone.

Other thing to consider, is not all installers know how to properly terminate cat5, and what happens if you hook up a joey with cat5 and the installer comes out does not know how to do cat5 or has cat5 supplies and wire on his truck to fix it.
 

TheKrell

A mighty and noble race originating on Altair IV.
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Jan 4, 2007
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I suspect wired and wireless Joey installs may become supported in the near future. I base this speculation on the impending release of a SmartTV Joey emulator, which (correct me if I'm wrong) only works over cat5.
 

John Kotches

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Nov 21, 2003
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I suspect wired and wireless Joey installs may become supported in the near future. I base this speculation on the impending release of a SmartTV Joey emulator, which (correct me if I'm wrong) only works over cat5.

The minute that's supported, I'm disconnecting the coax and putting terminators on the node. I'd prefer that, but would rather be in a supported than unsupported configuration :)
 

britorto

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jul 1, 2012
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Indy
Claude Greiner said:
The coax is required because its what the installers have in the truck. They do not want all these non standard installations out there that they cannot trouble shoot over the phone.

Other thing to consider, is not all installers know how to properly terminate cat5, and what happens if you hook up a joey with cat5 and the installer comes out does not know how to do cat5 or has cat5 supplies and wire on his truck to fix it.

Smart home dish techs do carry cat 5 on their vans as well as being trained to terminate cat5. Personally one of my managers has a Joey connected with cat6 and he says it runs better then the other joeys. It's unsupported because it's to much of an outside risk. Customers router fries, now the joeys out and it's dishes fault. They create a service call and now what? Do we replace their router? You know the customer would want that free as well. I think one day it will be supported though, maybe not wirelessly but over direct Ethernet.
 

Scherrman

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Mar 14, 2008
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You are all aware that soon you will not even need a Joey at the TV. The TV will just need the capability of internet connection, wired or wireless.
 

Smwoodward

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 6, 2013
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0
Alabama
Smart home dish techs do carry cat 5 on their vans as well as being trained to terminate cat5. Personally one of my managers has a Joey connected with cat6 and he says it runs better then the other joeys. It's unsupported because it's to much of an outside risk. Customers router fries, now the joeys out and it's dishes fault. They create a service call and now what? Do we replace their router? You know the customer would want that free as well. I think one day it will be supported though, maybe not wirelessly but over direct Ethernet.

I could see dish installing a certified switch that would work better than consumer routers.

Personally I like the idea of MoCA because it creates a separate subnet for all video traffic to travel on and not slowing down my network in anyway. I could see if you have multiple hoppers and joeys all watching something that it could bring a gigabit network nearly to its knees. Unless there was a reason to now use MoCA, like all the coax is not rg6 and there is already Ethernet and the customer didn't want to pay for fishing wire through the wall.


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cditty

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 22, 2006
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Northeast Louisiana
That compressed video isn't very taxing on the network. I do agree that 2 Hoppers and 4 Joeys would be best off on a separate network.

I actually put in a little 8 port switch just last night, Hooked Hopper & Joey to it, then let it grab another IP from my cable modem, so the video traffic is no longer traversing my 'Netflix, Hulu, & House network'.
 

caseyatbt

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Supporting Founder
Oct 29, 2003
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Monument, CO
I have put off getting the Hopper due to difficulty getting coax to the areas I need it. The current coax is shared and I know that the Hopper needs a dedicated cable. I have been waiting for a network option. It sounds like using wifi could bog down the wifi traffic unless you add a second wifi router and use a different channel than the other router. What about powerline? I would imagine it is not the cleanest way to transmit the signal. I am using Powerline with my Bluray player and it streams Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon just fine.
 
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