Is the Dish website still acting buggy? (1 Viewer)

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Ghpr13

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Pub Member / Supporter
Jul 1, 2009
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Louisville, KY
I just switched to Windows 7 and I'm using Firefox 3.6. I seem to be having problems with the Dish website...not loading right, not always recognizing my log in info, and a lost of the little Dish favicon (Which really upsets me)...So is it me or Dish's site?

Just tried to log in...after entering my info it takes me to the "retrieve password" page, then I need to enter my phone# and zip, then I get the security question page, then they email me my password. This is the third time in 2 days this has happened.
Ghpr13:confused:
 
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dlharm

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Pub Member / Supporter
Lifetime Supporter
Aug 5, 2009
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So. Central Nebraska
I use Firefox 3.6 on Windows 7 and I notice when I try to log in using Roboform's fill and submit I get taken to the password retrieval page but if I just use the fill option and click on the Log-In button I get taken to my account page and all is okay.
I am not sure if this is what you are doing but this is what I have experienced.
 

Ghpr13

SatelliteGuys Pro
Pub Member / Supporter
Jul 1, 2009
3,212
0
Louisville, KY
I use Firefox 3.6 on Windows 7 and I notice when I try to log in using Roboform's fill and submit I get taken to the password retrieval page but if I just use the fill option and click on the Log-In button I get taken to my account page and all is okay.
I am not sure if this is what you are doing but this is what I have experienced.

dlharm,
That's exactly what I'm doing, using Roboform. Thanks for the tip...I'll try it "the old fashion way".
Take care,
Ghpr13:)
 

chicagonettech

SatelliteGuys Pro
Storeing Passwords for DN or any other site

Hey All;

Just a reminder that is is NEVER SAFE to store passwords on any computer that is used by more than one person, and it is especially NOT SAFE to store passwords in a work situation.

While these are stored as "encrypted" entries in the registry of the computer, it is very easy to hack and read both the usernames and passwords, making them retrievable by anyone with access to the computer.

In all of our workplace environments, we routinely sweep and remove all stored passwords - it's done once a night, automatically. We also don't allow "password lockers" or any other password storage device.

Given the fact that the likes of Google can be hacked by Chinese college students; given the fact than more than one billion credit card accounts were hacked last year; and given the fact that personal identity theft is on the rise; I would automatically assume that no storage of any password is safe, in any environment.

In fact, unless a server is physically locked into a secure room, with no access by anyone except the server's administrator(s), even network passwords are no longer safe - which is why all of the new security rules for servers used for military, government, and healthcare call for the servers to be physically sequestered and under the limited access of only one or two individuals.

Play it safe

- never store your password on any computer;
- never use a word found in a dictionary;
- never use a family member name, birthdate, anniversary date or pet's name;
- use a password that's at least 8 characters in length, contains upper and lower case letters and numbers;
- don't write your passwords down - unless you lock them in a physical safe accessible only by you;
- NEVER SHARE ANY PASSWORD WITH ANYONE.

As more and more data is stored online and made accessible to all of us via passwords, the safe creation, use and storage of passwords is going to become more and more important.
 
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