Is Verizon's FiOS out of bandwidth?

chek_ya_self

SatelliteGuys Family
Oct 7, 2007
48
0
Is Verizon's FiOS out of bandwidth?

Sounds crazy right? Seriously, how could a fiber optic network be out of bandwidth? In most networks, the last mile (in this case fiber) is the bottleneck, but despite what Verizon has told us, it appears there is a bottleneck further upstream

Found at Cable Rant
 
Last edited:

Grimlok

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
Mar 29, 2005
27
0
NJ
This is physically impossible. There is no limitation to the amount of bandwidth over fiber optical lines. It's all about the equipment that feeds the lines.
 

BvF7734

New Member
Aug 27, 2007
2
0
No physical Limit?

With Fiber there is no medium that impedes the flow of data. When you here that a new speed record has been made where as scientists have been able to transfer the equiv of 800 Billion Pr0n DVD's a sec is simply a matter of the 2 ends and how fast they can read and send the pulses of light in different frequencies. Unlike copper where there is a finite limit to what can be squeezed out of it, Fiber has no theoretical limits on how much gets shoved down. They use the same fiber that connects to the home as they do for an OCWhatever etc.
 

Bountykiller

Pub Member / Supporter
Feb 22, 2004
379
0
That actually is only somewhat true... there are different types of fiber. Multi-Mode cant hande the same speed as single mode, nor the distance. All Long haul runs are done via single mode fiber. There are also different sizes of fiber. 50 Micron for example versus 80 or 70. One is DEF faster than the other. It is all to do with attenuation. Single Mode fibers are less susceptible to attenuation than multimode fibers hence their use for increased bandwidth and long haul runs. Single for example would NEVER make it across the ocean for islands and inter-continental runs. I know what you are trying to say, but it simply doesnt work that way in the real world. Depending upon the distance and medium the fiber is either more prone or less prone to attenuation which all leads to a real world ability to actually pump increased bandwidth capacity across it. Accordingly, well your basis is seemingly sound at first, it is actually in-correct in the real world applications of fiber.
 

bsexton

SatelliteGuys Family
Mar 7, 2006
61
1
Bloomfield, IN
This is physically impossible. There is no limitation to the amount of bandwidth over fiber optical lines. It's all about the equipment that feeds the lines.

There is indeed a limit. However the limit of the fiber is VERY high. Single mode fiber has a theoretical bandwidth of approximately 200 GHz. There are however, as you stated, no devices to terminate the fiber that supports that bandwidth. I believe 10 gigabit per fiber is about as good as you can do with the equipment currently available. Higher speeds have been achieved by aggregating multiple fibers.
 

harshness

SatelliteGuys Master
May 5, 2007
16,865
2,917
Salem, OR
This is physically impossible. There is no limitation to the amount of bandwidth over fiber optical lines. It's all about the equipment that feeds the lines.
It is physically possible to run out of bandwidth and there are decided limitations given the current technology.

Are they up against the wall? Probably not.

Did they cut their nose off to spite their face when the chose QAM over switched digital? Probably.
 

Speck's Dad

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Jul 10, 2007
22
0
Richmond, VA
I think the point is that the VZ's inability to add a bunch of hd channels now is not due to limits of fiber but to the limits of the equipment. I'm not an expert ...I'm not remotely educated on the ins and outs of fiber, but I really don't think the issue is the fiber itself.
 

garlandtxuser

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 27, 2006
183
0
Garland, Texas
There is indeed a limit. However the limit of the fiber is VERY high. Single mode fiber has a theoretical bandwidth of approximately 200 GHz. There are however, as you stated, no devices to terminate the fiber that supports that bandwidth. I believe 10 gigabit per fiber is about as good as you can do with the equipment currently available. Higher speeds have been achieved by aggregating multiple fibers.

Actually, you are correct but also incorrect. 10 Gig is the current limit per channel. Fiber can be channalized utilizing DWDM giving many channels of 10gig capacity.

For those curious on how this is done (in basic langauge), the light is broken into multiple colors and each color is a seperate instance of the light (signal). This is similiar to using a prism against a beam of sunlight and then recapturing the difference colors at the other end with another prism.
 

Bountykiller

Pub Member / Supporter
Feb 22, 2004
379
0
I typo'd on my post. Meant to say that multi-mode cant do long haul runs where as single can. Anyways, like all things in life, there are limits. Fiber is no exeption to that rule regardless of what Verizon wants you to believe. Notably the speed of light is a constant too. Until recently, nobody even theorized on how to speed it up more than it 's current constant of 300 metres a second. Euro boffins increase speed of light - vnunet.com

Either way, all very cool stuff ;0
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Top