Just noticed something today.

Sileny Jizda

Sileny Jizda

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 5, 2007
117
0
Hell's Outhouse, Ohio
I noticed something today about the install on our dish. It was as a result of looking at a neighbors install where a carpenter nailed through his incoming cable. Our installer seems to have zip tied our incoming line from the dish on a main gas pipe line on the outside of the house. It is grounded properly I assume but how great of an idea is it to zip tie a cable from a sat dish on a main gas line pipe? Should it have been done differently? The customer service person we talked to said we signed off on the install so it's basically our problem.

:confused:
 
webbydude

webbydude

SatelliteGuys Master
Feb 6, 2005
5,339
1
Akron, Ohio, United States
There really is no big problem with having coax zip tied to a gas line. The cable is insulated. And (assuming here...) your gas line isn't leaking.
 
Sileny Jizda

Sileny Jizda

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 5, 2007
117
0
Hell's Outhouse, Ohio
Nope, no leak. It just doesn't seem like the first thing I would do given if the dish was hit the cable attached to the gas main wouldn't seem to like the sudden surge of juice running through it.
 
dishcomm

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,388
554
suburbia
I noticed something today about the install on our dish. It was as a result of looking at a neighbors install where a carpenter nailed through his incoming cable. Our installer seems to have zip tied our incoming line from the dish on a main gas pipe line on the outside of the house. It is grounded properly I assume but how great of an idea is it to zip tie a cable from a sat dish on a main gas line pipe? Should it have been done differently? The customer service person we talked to said we signed off on the install so it's basically our problem.

:confused:
what type of "line" is it?..Itis black or galvanized pipe? Or is is the thin wall copper tubing...
If it's the former, no problem. If it's the latter I would jhave chosen to attach the cable in another manner. In either case it's nopt earth shattering. The cable will do no harm.
 
Sileny Jizda

Sileny Jizda

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 5, 2007
117
0
Hell's Outhouse, Ohio
No idea as to the type other than it's not the small copper type. It's painted and about 3"-4" wide and goes to both the meter and the gas pump in the back yard.
 
A

Andrewwski

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2007
1,205
4
I'd personally cut the ties carefully and move the cable away...but there's probably nothing wrong with it.
 
boba

boba

SatelliteGuys Master
Dec 12, 2003
11,350
1,033
Dorchester, TX.
Your only sending 18V dc on tha coax so a spark is the most dangerous thing. And you sure as sh*t arenn't going to pound any nails into it.
 
Sileny Jizda

Sileny Jizda

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Jan 5, 2007
117
0
Hell's Outhouse, Ohio
Your only sending 18V dc on tha coax so a spark is the most dangerous thing. And you sure as sh*t arenn't going to pound any nails into it.

I was thinking more along the lines of a lightening strike to the dish and it traveling down the cable attached to the gas main. I know they are rare but we are on a hill.
 
dishcomm

dishcomm

SatelliteGuys Master
Nov 29, 2005
10,388
554
suburbia
I was thinking more along the lines of a lightening strike to the dish and it traveling down the cable attached to the gas main. I know they are rare but we are on a hill.
Naah...Put it this way the chances of such an unsual occurance are so remote that odds are greater than winning Powerball..Just a guess.
 
pduncan

pduncan

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jul 13, 2006
278
3
You have absolutely nothing to worry about. IN addition to the things said above......Even if it did leak, and you did get a spark, natural gas has to be in a certain concentration before it will ignite. It's not like you see on TV. And, since this is all outside, a small leak would mix in the atmosphere real fast to the point it could not ignite. And, the pressure in a residential natural gas line is so low, it would take forever to build up any concentration that would be worrisome.

But hey, if your house did go BOOM you could sue the crap out of someone and get a new house!!
 
Last edited:
S

SmityWhity

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 8, 2006
1,246
0
Denver, CO
Naah...Put it this way the chances of such an unsual occurance are so remote that odds are greater than winning Powerball..Just a guess.
Actually, you have better chances at getting hit by lightning twice, than winning the Powerball; even when you are not on a hill. :eek:

As said/implied, I believe a gas leak inside the home building up concentration would be more of a concern; but I would avoid it.

However... If it's tied to a 3 to 4 inch diameter pipe between a natural gas pump and a residential meter, may I recommend sleeping at least on the other side of the house. :D

Although this is he said/she said...
I don't believe any judge would go along with the claim that "a customer signing a work-order that services were performed, means the customer is smarter than a certified engineer and/or building inspector and certifies that the work is in accordance with all National, State, County, and/or Local Codes and releases all other parties from any liability."

And if it's not done according to code, your insurance company will have various thoughts about paying.

Call your local building inspector/code enforcement office and see what they have to say. They might want to have some occupational licenses suspended. :D
 
C

Crash&Burn

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Oct 11, 2007
22
0
missouri
You have no worry............as a commercial HVAC installer I've had to tap many of a gas line to add a unit, you probally won't believe it but I just shut the pressure off and then with a cutting torch cut the proper size hole, then welded my theadolet to the pipe. The gas was never bleed out of the line.
Like the fellow just said if you don't proper fuel/air mixture nothing is going to happen!
 
5

585960

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 4, 2007
437
0
my house
I would move immediately. To a downtown seedy district preferably where the air is a mix of monosodium glutamate, curry, and diesel fumes!!!:D:up:hungry:
 
Last edited:
W

wassupTC

SatelliteGuys Guru
Sep 12, 2007
136
0
A 3-4" diameter gas line coming into your house or even running close to your house seems quite odd. Gas mains in the city generally don't get any bigger than 6" and the branch lines off of the main are only about 2" in diameter, and that can serve several city blocks.

If there's no other pipes coming into your meter other than this one, then I guess it's a gas line...it just seems extremely large for a residential service. Either way, it's grounded, and so is your dish. I think you're ok.
 

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