Mirroring with Hopper/Joey

saxmann

Member
Original poster
Dec 28, 2008
9
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Midwest USA
Mirroring with Hopper/Joey?

Hello,

I currently have a 722 with the TV2 signal split to 3 different TVs. It's just me and my wife in my house and we primarily have the 722 in single mode. I have a few questions about how moving to a Hopper/Joey system would work.

- Keeping HD on all 4 TVs is not a priority.

- I'm assuming I would need at least 1 Joey unless I wanted to run HDMI/Component cables with splitters all over my house (which I don't). Let's say I have the Joey in our bedroom. What would be the best way for me to get that signal mirrored to an office and another room? If this is possible, would an installer have to set this up for me, or is this something I can do after they finish the Hopper/Joey install?

- I really don't want to pay the monthly fees for 2 additional Joey's and would not like to move a Joey from place to place since at most, only 2 live streams are ever going to be watched.

- I've found that with the 722 in single mode, the SD signal to TV2 still displays the HD channels in the correct aspect ratio on widescreen TVs (it does not if the 722 is set to dual mode). Does anyone have a guess if the SD output on the Joey would at least show the correct aspect ratio and fill the screen on most programming? I'm not concerned with HD, only that the aspect ratio is correct.

- It may not make sense for us to upgrade, as our current setup works great for us, but I would like to know what my options are.

Thank you!
 
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Whatever you want to mirror you can just use an RF Modulator and then split that signal to how ever many TVs you wish. I plan on mirroring one of my TVs with the new system.
 
Thanks for the reply.

So you would take the composite connections out of the Joey into the RF modulator and then to the other TVs via coax, right? Would you then have to run a second coax line from the RF modulator to be split to the other TVs? Or can it run back up the same coax that goes to the Joey?

I've never been clear about splitting and combining signals through the same cable...
 
Thanks for the reply.

So you would take the composite connections out of the Joey into the RF modulator and then to the other TVs via coax, right? Would you then have to run a second coax line from the RF modulator to be split to the other TVs? Or can it run back up the same coax that goes to the Joey?

I've never been clear about splitting and combining signals through the same cable...

I'm not sure how combining signals will work with the Moca setup.
 
Thanks for the reply.

So you would take the composite connections out of the Joey into the RF modulator and then to the other TVs via coax, right? Would you then have to run a second coax line from the RF modulator to be split to the other TVs? Or can it run back up the same coax that goes to the Joey?

I've never been clear about splitting and combining signals through the same cable...

Theoretically it should be doable on one cable with limitations, but unless you inclined to experiment and play with this stuff, it's probably better to have an extra line run to the Joey and leave the existing coax to feed the modulator into. Some of the OTA bandwidth is encroached upon by Moca and what's left of it Dish has designated as "future use."
 
Annoyingly, that "future use" block is sitting right over channel 3 right up to UHF channel 32 (or thereabouts). :(
 
Thanks for the reply.

So you would take the composite connections out of the Joey into the RF modulator and then to the other TVs via coax, right? Would you then have to run a second coax line from the RF modulator to be split to the other TVs? Or can it run back up the same coax that goes to the Joey?

I've never been clear about splitting and combining signals through the same cable...
What is that ? Joye ?

Point me to how you'll use it on the picture:
joeyvertback.jpg
 
They may have just put that "future use" tag in there to prevent people from trying to diplex on their cabling, not wanting to have to deal with those kind of trouble calls. ;)

We all would have felt safer if it had said "SOON to be used"..... ;)
 
Combining signals that are a different frequency on a single cable is done without issues. Combining signals that are close in frequency will cause trouble.
 
They may have just put that "future use" tag in there to prevent people from trying to diplex on their cabling, not wanting to have to deal with those kind of trouble calls. ;)

We all would have felt safer if it had said "SOON to be used"..... ;)

I would tend to agree, even if they use it, I would think it's more likely to be needed with the next version of the Hopper and not with a Joey.

I'm 90+% confident I could get a modulated feed and Dish's moca on the same cable, but don't want to imply to anyone, "sure you can, it'll be easy." At least not until it's been done by someone. If they have to question how, running a second line for the Joey up front is the sure fire way.
 
Thanks for all of your replies. Looks like dropping a second line from an RF modulator and tying into my existing mirroring cabling would be the simplest solution
 
Umm... as I said, the composite output from the Joey would go into the RF modulator, and from that it would be sent out of the coax from the modulator. Am I missing something?

No, your not missing anything.
 
Lt Disher said:
Just open your eyes that looks like composite to me.

Smith, P might be confusing composite for component connections.

Composite connections red, green and yellow. The red and white are used for audio. Yellow is used for video.

Component connections are red, green, blue, white and red. The red, green and blue are used for video. Red and white connections are used for audio.

The connections of the joey in the picture from top down are, rg6....composite (out).....optical (out)....hdmi....Ethernet....usb and power.
 
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