Mixed Reality Headset and Augmented Reality Glasses coming.

harshness

harshness

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It seems like the product will probably hit the market as little more than a HUD.

Reading patent details is fun but the part about the self-adjusting lenses went out the window with the caveat on the pricing that it didn't include a eyeglass prescription.

Being tied to a powerful iPhone is cutting the market by perhaps 75%.
 
TheForce

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It also has to be the iphone v14 that is equipped with the additional wifi version. But that's all fine. Apple doesn't make products to attach to competitive phones. The Apple Glasses will be a display accessory for the iphone same as the Apple watch. I don't think it is a serious problem if they can only sell to 25% of the smart phone users.

The prescription for eye glasses is always separate from the actually frames and lenses. It was not real clear on what will be available but if the software can indeed do vision correction to replace progressive lenses, that will be a big winner for eye-wear corrective lenses. I tried progressives and they drove me nuts trying to aim properly. I took them back. Bifocals were worse. But we'll see how they work in a couple years. Based on the rumors, and the price, I'm willing to be an early adopter, same as I was for the Apple Watch and Airpods.

On the mixed reality, I'm not so interested. I have the Oculus Quest 2 and love it. I never was really into games with the Xbox and Play Station, but the Oculus Quest has me hooked. I was an early adopter of the HMD when all it was is a HMD holder for the iphone running an app.
 
harshness

harshness

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It also has to be the iphone v14 that is equipped with the additional wifi version. But that's all fine. Apple doesn't make products to attach to competitive phones.
And apparently not to most of their own phones -- none of which yet offer functional support for Wi-fi 6E.
I don't think it is a serious problem if they can only sell to 25% of the smart phone users.
As it is to be limited to those phones that support Wi-fi 6E, it will be a small percentage of iPhone >=14 users and that's a relatively small number even in iPhone terms.
The prescription for eye glasses is always separate from the actually frames and lenses.
Yet the article made a big deal about the patent regarding dynamic correction adjustment that clearly shouldn't require a prescription.
Based on the rumors, and the price, I'm willing to be an early adopter, same as I was for the Apple Watch and Airpods.
The promises in the article made mention of many things that don't appear to be anywhere near ready so early adopters may well take a icy cold bath come v2. Especially for older consumers, correction changes seem to be something that happens more often as accommodation is lost. Watches and earbuds don't require constant adjustment like autofocus does and as a photographer, you well know what's involved with autofocus and the pain and suffering of turning it on and off.

I think progressive lenses are being pushed way too hard, but when I think about having the depend on your phone's camera to provide correction adjustments for your eyeglasses, I wonder if this has really been all that well thought out versus some of the claims that have been made so distant from when they are likely to become available.
 
TheForce

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Yet the article made a big deal about the patent regarding dynamic correction adjustment that clearly shouldn't require a prescription.
I don't think you understood how vision correction works. The eye doesn't tell the glasses how to correct. The prescription dictates the correction and that correction is determined from an eye exam. The eye exam is conducted by a series of eye tests where you describe what is in focus and what isn't. While I see a possibility of someone doing their own eye exam to determine the correction, that was not claimed in the speculation I saw. Apple already has one eye test I use for calibrating 3D so why not do more?

There were no promises, only leaks of what is under development and speculation. Let's not get carried away here. I just said based on what what was shown, and the price of $500 I would be an early adopter. I was disappointed when Google dropped development of their AR project.

BTW- I use Oculus Rift HMD to edit 360 VR video I shoot with Adobe Premiere Pro. It saves many hours of editing VR than with a flat screen.


I've told you this before going back to the first days of the apple watch. Nobody ever created anything with the attitude of can't. Eventually the naysayers arrive to the present with the rest of us. We saw it with the desktop computer, the laptop, the ipad, the smart phone, the apple watch and similar that work with android. Solar power, electric vehicles, and on and on.
 
TheForce

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Please review the video at 2:27.
Right, the speculation by the author is the need for a NEW prescription. That didn't say the first systems will be able to know the starting point for correction. However I predicted that you could develop an app that a person could run the tests a doctor runs and the wearer do the analysis on his own in the same way. This does not replace the other eye diseases that a doctor tests for, however.

Just be careful you understand the difference between what is speculated as possible with this technology and what will be in the first release.
My first Apple Watch couldn't make phone calls without the iphone. Now it can. It could not do ECG and Blood O2 levels, now it can.

As I understand this vision correction process is that it does not do any variable optical refractive correction to bring things into focus, rather it shoots a video of the what's in view of the cameras and then projects that image in a fixed focus. The lenses in the glasses are the starting point prescription lenses just the same as a pair of regular glasses that focus up close. The view is then projected in focus for various distances on those prescription lenses. If the battery dies then the view is up close and everything distant is out of focus. Like wearing reading glasses to see distance.
 
harshness

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Just be careful you understand the difference between what is speculated as possible with this technology and what will be in the first release.
My first Apple Watch couldn't make phone calls without the iphone. Now it can. It could not do ECG and Blood O2 levels, now it can.
So was being a bleeding edger beneficial to you in this case?
As I understand this vision correction process is that it does not do any variable optical refractive correction to bring things into focus, rather it shoots a video of the what's in view of the cameras and then projects that image in a fixed focus.
The phrase used with respect to the "optical assembly" of the Glass was that they "will be able to change their optical properties on the go". To me that pretty certainly indicates that the plan is to profile the lenses as necessary rather than engaging in video processing.

There are certainly many possibilities but this video seems to go a little overboard on exploring the possibilities versus what's on tap for early adopters.
 
TheForce

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So was being a bleeding edger beneficial to you in this case?
Yes, most defiantly. Actually back when I had an android phone I had the Sony smart watch and loved it. I wanted the Apple watch so much I switched to the iphone to upgrade from the Sony to the Apple Watch.

There are certainly many possibilities but this video seems to go a little overboard on exploring the possibilities versus what's on tap for early adopters.
Yes and everything works that way. The fundamental device does open the door to many new possibilities and creative thinkers will speculate. But, that is not to be confused with what Apple will claim is the feature set when released, nor what will be coming in the future.
The clue on the prescription feature is where the leak pricing specs states in discussion is $499 for the glasses + cost of prescription lenses. This was said to allow the wearer to not have to wear contact lenses with these Apple AR glasses.

FWIW- I have prescription special lenses for my wife to use the Oculus Quest. The snap onto the existing lenses in the Quest. Without those she has to wear her glasses with the Quest and that is not comfortable. Fortunately, I can focus down to the pixel level so I don't need prescription lenses with the Quest. Not sure about the Apple Glasses. I paid $75 for her Quest lenses.
 

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