MLB and the rule of unintended consequences

Radioguy41

SatelliteGuys Pro
Original poster
Aug 7, 2008
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Lehighton, PA
So far through Spring training and the early days of the regular season MLB is bragging that games are on avg about 30 minutes quicker. Sounds good right? Well, maybe, but maybe not. It apparently is slowly dawning on some people that maybe that isn't all it's cracked up to be. Who might those people be? Vendors. From the concession stands to the hawkers walking up and down the aisles and everyone in between they now have about 30 minutes less time to sell their products per game. Add that up over 81 home games (40.5 hrs of game time) and we are talking about the equivalent of roughly 14 fewer games or approx 2 weeks less gross income in a season.

Even slower to catch on are broadcast advertisers. When a vendor negotiates a deal with a radio or TV station for in game sponsorship that negotiation is based at least partly on total airtime exposure. MLB, in it's infinite wisdom, has now hacked 30 minutes off the exposure time a vendor is paying for and in this situation we're talking about 162 games, not just 81 home games. That is roughly 80 hours less airtime exposure in a season. I can see a situation arising where some vendors might start demanding a rebate. As with all the tinkering ownership has done in recent years this change was not well thought out. Man I miss real baseball. :(
 
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I, my kids and my grandkids make it to a handful of games each season. Our trips to Oakland and San Francisco for those games are always kind of a big deal for us. Our time at the stadium always flys and is over way to soon for us. When the prospect of much shorter games was first announced, my first thought was, that will be great for games I watch on tv but terrible for those games we travel to (and pay ridiculous $) to see live. All and all, not a fan of the pitch clock, live or on tv.
 
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From the concession stands to the hawkers walking up and down the aisles and everyone in between they now have about 30 minutes less time to sell their products per game.
In general, I agree with your post. However, don't you think most fans time their concession visits by the inning, not by the clock? So, if the kids were promised a treat after four innings, they're still going to spend as much money as before. Also, the lights won't be on for as long, so there are some savings there.
When a vendor negotiates a deal with a radio or TV station for in game sponsorship that negotiation is based at least partly on total airtime exposure.
Commercial money won't be sacrificed, since they are usually between half innings and during pitching changes. I'm sure these numbers were crunched long before the actions were taken.

JMO
 
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