New Dish Cell Phone

Looks like the 2022 iPhone SE will be 5G compatible, hopefully T-Mobile 5G compatible.
Don't know much about Apple products, but don't see why it wouldn't be. Low to mind range phones tend to be sub 6 only, so you'll get the two biggies with n71 and n41 but no mmWave. Not a huge deal since T-Mobile has very limited n261 mmWave deployed and mmWave has not been their focus.
 
  • Like
Reactions: navychop
At least in the case of T-Mobile, they've also deployed a lot of low-range (600-700 MHz) 5G, so it wouldn't surprise me if that kind of 5G coverage is getting close to their 4G coverage. AT&T has also deployed some low-range 5G too, but not as much, I think. But low-range 5G isn't *that* much faster than 4G, although I think it may have other benefits, e.g. lower latency.

My comment is based on one lowly tower site in the rural village I work in. So, take it for what it’s worth, which isn’t much, but here’s my observation. It went from being bands 12, 2 and 66 only to that plus the additions of band 71, n71 and n41 over the course of about a year. With a strong signal I would max out at 75 Mbps on band 71 LTE, when n71 NR launched, that doubled to 150 Mbps. n41 NR gets me 400 - 500 Mbps.

I can get 100 Mbps in the basement at work on n71, whereas I would max out at around 40 Mbps on band 71.

This tower site covers the gas station I usually fill up at, the sub shop I go to lunch at and the McDonalds I go to, among other places. And it’s been pretty consistent no matter where I am near work, NR is roughly twice as fast as LTE at the same location. Sometimes a little more than twice as fast, sometimes a little less, but approx. 2x the speed is what I’ve noticed.

Edit - The first sentence certainly holds true for me. Over the past 1 - 2 months, I have been on 5G 100% of the time, unless I'm in an area with no native T-Mobile coverage and I'm on LTE bands 25, 26 or 41 from Sprint.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NashGuy
My comment is based on one lowly tower site in the rural village I work in. So, take it for what it’s worth, which isn’t much, but here’s my observation. It went from being bands 12, 2 and 66 only to that plus the additions of band 71, n71 and n41 over the course of about a year. With a strong signal I would max out at 75 Mbps on band 71 LTE, when n71 NR launched, that doubled to 150 Mbps. n41 NR gets me 400 - 500 Mbps.

I can get 100 Mbps in the basement at work on n71, whereas I would max out at around 40 Mbps on band 71.

This tower site covers the gas station I usually fill up at, the sub shop I go to lunch at and the McDonalds I go to, among other places. And it’s been pretty consistent no matter where I am near work, NR is roughly twice as fast as LTE at the same location. Sometimes a little more than twice as fast, sometimes a little less, but approx. 2x the speed is what I’ve noticed.

Edit - The first sentence certainly holds true for me. Over the past 1 - 2 months, I have been on 5G 100% of the time, unless I'm in an area with no native T-Mobile coverage and I'm on LTE bands 25, 26 or 41 from Sprint.
Wow, so you're getting around twice the speed on long-range 5G (band n71 on 600 MHz) vs. long-range 4G (band 71 on 600 MHz). That's better than the general commentary I've read with regard to long-range 5G vs. 4G.

But no surprise that you're getting much higher speeds of 400 - 500 Mbps on that sweet mid-range 5G (band n41 on 2.5 GHz, which is what Sprint had so much of). Per T-Mo's coverage map, my house is barely within mid-range 5G coverage. I wonder if they're selling their new 5G wireless home broadband here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: charlesrshell
Don't know much about Apple products, but don't see why it wouldn't be. Low to mind range phones tend to be sub 6 only, so you'll get the two biggies with n71 and n41 but no mmWave. Not a huge deal since T-Mobile has very limited n261 mmWave deployed and mmWave has not been their focus.
mmWave is what all the 5G hype was initially about but it's going to end up being the least transformative part of 5G because it will only ever be deployed in very high-traffic spots. Just way too costly to bathe an entire metro area in mmWave; way too many small cells would have to be deployed.
 
Like I said, take it for what it's worth. It's only one report, from one tower. Just reporting my observations when it comes to 600 MHz. I have no service at home and work is where I spend the other half of my week so I've gotten to know the RF levels and speeds in the village pretty well.

For n41, I've maxed out at 780 down and 120 up but not in my immediate area.

I've had all four carriers multiple times and with my final stint with Sprint, 2013 - 2017, I enjoyed (I'm not saying this as a smartass either) the way they implemented band 41 with using TDD instead of FDD. I would peak at speeds over 200 Mbps (maybe partially due to intraband CA) on my mobile hotspot in many areas, sure the upload was 8 Mbps or less, but it was the download I cared about.
 
Just to expand on this a bit, I'm at my desk in my office right now using my phone as a mobile hotspot.

Tower is 1.5 miles away, connected to n71 at -103 dBm, and just hit 140 x 10.

12709744462.png
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot 2022-02-03 154040.jpg
    Screenshot 2022-02-03 154040.jpg
    15.6 KB · Views: 122
I heard AT&T was coming out with a Genie cell phone. It only does 2G and you will need an adapter to display 4K content.
charlie will charge people a room access fee for each number pushed:coco. i wouldnt use AT&T for anything with how crappy there customer service is. id'e make smoke signals and use two tin cans before i used AT&T:coco
 

Tenga Stations Return to DISH.

Satellite 110 Mystery

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Who Read This Thread (Total Members: 1)