Nexstar Media Group threatens largest local station blackout in TV history, according to DISH (3 Viewers)

tanman

SatelliteGuys Guru
Nov 4, 2006
136
107
For those saying use an OTA, it's not an option for me because of where I live and mountains blocking reception. I am surprised that the must carry law, if it still exists, does not apply to those that cannot get OTA.
According to one antenna website I would need a 250 foot high tower to get the networks(other than PBS ) and the network towers are on top of an over 4000 foot mountain.I did try with a Channel Master 4 bay antenna on my roof.No luck.
 
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TheTechGuru

SatelliteGuys Pro
Oct 30, 2010
1,675
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Texas
Exactly... Paypal is safer from a CC standpoint, but it doesn't matter from a location standpoint. Locast uses geolocation to determine your access eligibility, and a VPN or Location Guard extension takes care of that.
This only applies to computers BTW. Mobile devices with the Locast app use the GPS which you'll need to be jailbroken or rooted to fake.
 

mwdxer1

SatelliteGuys Pro
Nov 3, 2015
1,331
1,133
Seaside Oregon
For those saying use an OTA, it's not an option for me because of where I live and mountains blocking reception. I am surprised that the must carry law, if it still exists, does not apply to those that cannot get OTA.
Yes, I think stations should have translators to serve their DMA. Otherwise why should a certain area be in a DNA that is not served by that market of TV stations. One thing about Oregon, we have translators all over for most areas in the state, either Portland, Eugene, Medford, Bend, etc. Even some in Eastern Oregon import Boise ID stations. Seattle has very few translators, but Spokane has many. Like here on the Northern OR coast, we are served by the majority of Portland stations. The translators are all owned by the Portland TV stations.They do good maintenance on them too. If one goes off, they are up and going within a couple of days at the most.
 

NYDutch

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Pub Member / Supporter
Dec 28, 2013
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Where our wheels go
As much as I do like just punching in a channel number on Dish to get the locals, as an active mobile RV'er (in normal times), I do use a variety of ways to get the local news and and network shows as we move from DMA to DMA. If we're staying in DMA for a period of time, changing my service address is simple enough, but for short stays of one or two days, what I typically do is change my service address to a DMA where Dish has CONUS coverage for the network shows, and then read the local news and weather online or stream them if they're available OTA. Many times for overnight stops I don't set up our dish and instead use various streaming options for TV, including DishAnywhere connecting to the Hopper w/Sling at our family cottage in upstate NY. For streaming, between the free "cable channel" apps we can use with our Dish subscription and the Spectrum account I have access to, we can watch pretty much anything we normally do. The only streaming services I pay for are Locast and Stremium (formerly FitzyTV), a combination that gives us both at least regional locals plus DVR capabilities for a number of the channels we enjoy watching. At $10.50/mo combined, I find it well worth it. The bottom line for us and maybe others that may be losing or have lost local channels is that there are options available that can at least make these outages less painful while still giving you the programming that you want.
 

TheTechGuru

SatelliteGuys Pro
Oct 30, 2010
1,675
139
Texas
As much as I do like just punching in a channel number on Dish to get the locals, as an active mobile RV'er (in normal times), I do use a variety of ways to get the local news and and network shows as we move from DMA to DMA. If we're staying in DMA for a period of time, changing my service address is simple enough, but for short stays of one or two days, what I typically do is change my service address to a DMA where Dish has CONUS coverage for the network shows, and then read the local news and weather online or stream them if they're available OTA. Many times for overnight stops I don't set up our dish and instead use various streaming options for TV, including DishAnywhere connecting to the Hopper w/Sling at our family cottage in upstate NY. For streaming, between the free "cable channel" apps we can use with our Dish subscription and the Spectrum account I have access to, we can watch pretty much anything we normally do. The only streaming services I pay for are Locast and Stremium (formerly FitzyTV), a combination that gives us both at least regional locals plus DVR capabilities for a number of the channels we enjoy watching. At $10.50/mo combined, I find it well worth it. The bottom line for us and maybe others that may be losing or have lost local channels is that there are options available that can at least make these outages less painful while still giving you the programming that you want.
No OTA antenna?
 

peggy97850

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 16, 2012
581
213
Western US
Yes, I think stations should have translators to serve their DMA. Otherwise why should a certain area be in a DNA that is not served by that market of TV stations. One thing about Oregon, we have translators all over for most areas in the state, either Portland, Eugene, Medford, Bend, etc. Even some in Eastern Oregon import Boise ID stations. Seattle has very few translators, but Spokane has many. Like here on the Northern OR coast, we are served by the majority of Portland stations. The translators are all owned by the Portland TV stations.They do good maintenance on them too. If one goes off, they are up and going within a couple of days at the most.
Only problem with translator in Eastern OR is that we have to pay a yearly fee to get signal so it's easier to use Dish locals. Now with losing CBS I may have to finally do something about an antenna (hope Dish will offer one) or pay extra for All Access & stream.
 

sam_gordon

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May 21, 2009
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Lexington, ky
Only problem with translator in Eastern OR is that we have to pay a yearly fee to get signal so it's easier to use Dish locals. Now with losing CBS I may have to finally do something about an antenna (hope Dish will offer one) or pay extra for All Access & stream.
Can you explain the bolded? Who do you pay a fee to? Why?
 
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Bobby

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Supporting Founder
Lifetime Supporter
Sep 7, 2003
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Rohnert Park, CA
How does that work? Is the translator signal encoded?
If I remember correctly the City of Ukiah, CA had one of these many years back when they didn't have CATV available yet. The city billed it to all residents on their city billing. It was really only a token amount, like 1 or 2 dollars a month. It gave residents access to San Francisco channels. Ukiah is 116 miles from San Francisco.
 

sam_gordon

SatelliteGuys Pro
May 21, 2009
2,149
949
Lexington, ky
If I remember correctly the City of Ukiah, CA had one of these many years back when they didn't have CATV available yet. The city billed it to all residents on their city billing. It was really only a token amount, like 1 or 2 dollars a month. It gave residents access to San Francisco channels. Ukiah is 116 miles from San Francisco.
How did they handle multiple stations? Multiple translators?
 

peggy97850

SatelliteGuys Pro
Mar 16, 2012
581
213
Western US
Can you explain the bolded? Who do you pay a fee to? Why?
There's a local translator district that provides signals for 2 counties, cost is $100 year. Can be billed to prop taxes if you don't have satellite or cable. Most in area have either cable or satellite for locals because in winter it's more reliable (we're in a valley 260 miles from Portland, OR where our "locals" are). The price of living in beautiful Eastern Oregon :)
 

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