The Random Acts Of Kindness Thread

TRG

SatelliteGuys Master
Original poster
Pub Member / Supporter
Jul 19, 2007
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Albuquerque, NM
Let’s face it, there is a lot of bad stuff going on these days. However, I’m kindling a few smoldering embers of hope in humanity. Lets use this thread to capture random acts of kindness that you witness while out in the world. It can be something little or it can be large. It can be something that you do or something that you observe.

I’ll start.

I went to Costco today. I don’t usually go on the weekend because of the insane crowds. Although it always seems crowded regardless of the day or time. I had to park pretty far away from the front door. On my trek across the parking lot I noticed an elderly lady struggling to get her purchases into the trunk of her car. I observed several groups of people mindlessly walk past her and not offer assistance. I think I even saw one teenage kid laugh at her struggles and keep walking. Bear in mind it’s hot too. We’ve been in the high 90’s low 100’s for the last couple of weeks. Standing on the blacktop in the parking lot seems a lot hotter. Anyway I quickened the pace and asked if I could help. The look of relief on the woman's face was priceless. It took me less than 30 seconds of my time to unload her cart into the trunk. It was no big sacrifice for me but I feel it mattered a great deal to her. As a bonus it made me feel good.

I’m sure that there are hundred of little stories like this that you SatelliteGuys can share. Let’s keep this going.
 
I saw this on social media and thought I'd post it here.

I arrived at the address and honked the horn. After waiting a few minutes I honked again. Since this was going to be my last ride of my shift I thought about just driving away, but instead I put the car in park and walked up to the door and knocked.. 'Just a minute', answered a frail, elderly voice. I could hear something being dragged across the floor.After a long pause, the door opened. A small woman in her 90's stood before me. She was wearing a print dress and a pillbox hat with a veil pinned on it, like somebody out of a 1940's movie. By her side was a small nylon suitcase. The apartment looked as if no one had lived in it for years. All the furniture was covered with sheets. There were no clocks on the walls, no knickknacks or utensils on the counters. In the corner was a cardboard box filled with photos and glassware.' Would you carry my bag out to the car?' she said. I took the suitcase to the cab, then returned to assist the woman. She took my arm and we walked slowly toward the curb.She kept thanking me for my kindness. 'It's nothing', I told her.. 'I just try to treat my passengers the way I would want my mother to be treated.'' Oh, you're such a good boy,’ she said. When we got in the cab, she gave me an address and then asked, 'Could you drive through downtown?'' It's not the shortest way,' I answered quickly..' Oh, I don't mind,' she said. 'I'm in no hurry. I'm on my way to a hospice.’I looked in the rear-view mirror. Her eyes were glistening. 'I don't have any family left,' she continued in a soft voice.. ‘The doctor says I don't have very long.' I quietly reached over and shut off the meter.'What route would you like me to take?' I asked.For the next two hours, we drove through the city. She showed me the building where she had once worked as an elevator operator. We drove through the neighborhood where she and her husband had lived when they were newlyweds. She had me pull up in front of a furniture warehouse that had once been a ballroom where she had gone dancing as a girl.Sometimes she'd ask me to slow in front of a particular building or corner and would sit staring into the darkness, saying nothing. As the first hint of sun was creasing the horizon, she suddenly said, 'I'm tired. Let's go now'. We drove in silence to the address she had given me. It was a low building, like a small convalescent home, with a driveway that passed under a portico. Two orderlies came out to the cab as soon as we pulled up. They were solicitous and intent, watching her every move.They must have been expecting her. I opened the trunk and took the small suitcase to the door. The woman was already seated in a wheelchair.' How much do I owe you?' She asked, reaching into her purse. 'Nothing,' I said.' You have to make a living,' she answered.' There are other passengers,' I responded. Almost without thinking, I bent and gave her a hug. She held onto me tightly. 'You gave an old woman a little moment of joy,' she said. 'Thank you. 'I squeezed her hand, and then walked into the dim morning light.. Behind me, a door shut. It was the sound of the closing of a life.. I didn't pick up any more passengers that shift. I drove aimlessly lost in thought. For the rest of that day, I could hardly talk. What if that woman had gotten an angry driver, or one who was impatient to end his shift? What if I had refused to take the run, or had honked once, then driven away? On a quick review, I don't think that I have done anything more important in my life. We're conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one. PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID ~BUT~ THEY WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.
 
I saw this on social media and thought I'd post it here.
I am reminded of something I did many, many years ago. In another lifetime I was a telephone repairman. Among my duties was taking care of telephones in old peoples homes including private lines for the home guests. I often made visits to a particular home in Highland Park, CA. I visited often enough to actually know many of these folks by name. There was this particular lady that just seemed lonely, more lonely than most of the others. I really can't remember her name today but we each knew each other by our first names in that time. I was fixing her phone in December, there wasn't really anything wrong with it but she would call from time to time having some issue or other with it, and asked if she was going to her families house to celebrate Christmas. "Oh no" she said, "I don't have much family." I smiled and bid her a good day. I asked at the desk if she ever had visitors and was told that she never got visitors.

I was single in those days and lived in an apartment. My family was 3,000 miles away and many of my local friends were married with children. I was invited to Christmas dinner with an old friend and his wife and I accepted that invitation. I was to arrive at 4PM.

I got up on Christmas morning thinking about that old lady. I went down to the local Thrifty Drug Store which was open every day of the year. I bought a nice little statue of children playing in a field. Off I went to that old folks home. I went to the desk and announced myself and asked if I could visit with her. Of course I was told and they went down the hall to let her know she had a visitor. She came down the hall visibly confused, who would visit her. She took a look at me and there was first a look of who is this and then realizing who I was a giant smile. I spent all of that morning with her and half of the afternoon. We had a great time.

I visited with her several times after that until the day I walked in and was told she had passed. I was sad but I knew that when she left us she was not quite the lonely old lady that I had first met. Today I am an old man, probably older than she was, and count my lucky stars that I am blessed with a family that cares.
 
Her Mom was on a vent, Granddaughter and Husband had a name for baby due in less than a month (secret till born(also live in Illinois)). I suggested to give her Covid ICU nurse a phone so she could tell her Grandma the name. (keeping it secret to all of us) Nurse was really cool and went with holding the phone by her ear. Her mom passed the next day...
Moral of story, try to do the right thing imho, no matter what...
 
When I had my stroke back in April, I was left with a severe stutter that took a couple of months working with an excellent speech therapist to pretty much get under control. Before that though, my wife would step in to finish my words and sentences as needed with my blessing. One time though, I was in a store buying a sale item with an extended warranty without her along due to another commitment. The sale required I answer a number of questions for the registration. As I started doing my best to answer the clerk, I quickly saw the irritated look on her face as my stutter slowed down the process. After a few seconds, I heard the young woman that just checked out ahead of me quietly step in and complete a couple of my words. She quickly apologized and hoped I wasn't offended. I told her not at all, and to please continue if she had the time. So she stayed and was a big help in completing the transaction, which I could tell the clerk was grateful for as well. As we left the store together, she told me her mother had a bad stutter before she passed away last year, and the woman had often done same thing for her. When she heard me, she just stepped in without thinking. I thanked her profusely!
 
I just fully sponsored a K9 for a disabled war veteran with severe PTSD. The soldier and service animal have been vetted for more than 6 months. The two are absolutely inseparable now. May this brave man finally have some peace in his life.
 
I hesitated a little in posting this. Why? I don't know.

This morning I went to The Frontier Restaurant for breakfast before a long afternoon of Friday meetings. It's one of those places where you order at the counter and they display your number when your food is ready. The location is down by the university and lets say there is a large variety of "characters" that show up in the restaurant. If you are a people watcher this is the place to go. Anyway, I notice this guy at the next register over from me ordering a cup of coffee and paying in small change. He was very old, frail and I'm guessing homeless by the way he is dressed. I asked him if he had anything to eat today. He said, "No, I had a can of soup and some crackers yesterday for lunch." I asked him if I could buy him breakfast. He was very hesitant but agreed. I asked him what he wanted and pointed to the menu. He said, "would it be too much if I asked for ham and eggs?" I said no, If that's what you want I'll get it for you. I guess that was my way of paying it forward for the day.
 
I hesitated a little in posting this. Why? I don't know.

This morning I went to The Frontier Restaurant for breakfast before a long afternoon of Friday meetings. It's one of those places where you order at the counter and they display your number when your food is ready. The location is down by the university and lets say there is a large variety of "characters" that show up in the restaurant. If you are a people watcher this is the place to go. Anyway, I notice this guy at the next register over from me ordering a cup of coffee and paying in small change. He was very old, frail and I'm guessing homeless by the way he is dressed. I asked him if he had anything to eat today. He said, "No, I had a can of soup and some crackers yesterday for lunch." I asked him if I could buy him breakfast. He was very hesitant but agreed. I asked him what he wanted and pointed to the menu. He said, "would it be too much if I asked for ham and eggs?" I said no, If that's what you want I'll get it for you. I guess that was my way of paying it forward for the day.
That's the kind of generosity I respect. Buy the homeless a meal not donate the next bottle or pill.
 
Old thread I know. But sometimes disabilities can be positive. Back in 1989 I had surgery to remove a tumor from my brain stem that caused me to learn all over how to walk and talk again. Totally lost my vestibibular nerves and lost my otic nerves for my left ear. My right ear was damaged as a kid with a bad infection. Long story short I can hear a little but not much. I learned to read lips and get by fine with that. But the biggest thing was seeing deaf children. So for myself knowing I will be deaf soon I learned sign. Proud to say I go to children's hospitals and to foster homes and teach sign to deaf children. My handicap is helping children, our future.
 
Make it while you can. With EVs needing much less work, maybe a serious decline in business in what, ten years? Morph to new variations, such as truck work? RVs? Retirement? Best to ya!
 
We have some elderly folks living in our neighborhood that I check in on from time to time. I make sure they have groceries, medicine and other essentials. Now that winter is on the way I'll increase the frequency of my check-ins. Sometimes they have everything they need but they are lonely and need to have a conversation. So I'll just sit with them for a while and talk. I can tell it really means a lot to them.

When I was a young boy I loved Winnie The Poo. This particular segment struck me when I read it and I decided back then that I was going to be like this. Enjoy.

“It occurred to Pooh and Piglet that they hadn't heard from Eeyore for several days, so they put on their hats and coats and trotted across the Hundred Acre Wood to Eeyore's stick house. Inside the house was Eeyore. "Hello Eeyore," said Pooh. "Hello Pooh. Hello Piglet," said Eeyore, in a Glum Sounding Voice. "We just thought we'd check in on you," said Piglet, "because we hadn't heard from you, and so we wanted to know if you were okay." Eeyore was silent for a moment. "Am I okay?" he asked, eventually. "Well, I don't know, to be honest. Are any of us really okay? That's what I ask myself. All I can tell you, Pooh and Piglet, is that right now I feel really rather Sad, and Alone, and Not Much Fun To Be Around At All. Which is why I haven't bothered you. Because you wouldn't want to waste your time hanging out with someone who is Sad, and Alone, and Not Much Fun To Be Around At All, would you now." Pooh looked at Piglet, and Piglet looked at Pooh, and they both sat down, one on either side of Eeyore in his stick house. Eeyore looked at them in surprise. "What are you doing?" "We're sitting here with you," said Pooh, "because we are your friends. And true friends don't care if someone is feeling Sad, or Alone, or Not Much Fun To Be Around At All. True friends are there for you anyway. And so here we are." "Oh," said Eeyore. "Oh." And the three of them sat there in silence, and while Pooh and Piglet said nothing at all; somehow, almost imperceptibly, Eeyore started to feel a very tiny little bit better.

00Eeyore.jpg
 

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