Waterproofing Connections (1 Viewer)

LER

Supporter / Pub Member / Server Weenie
Sep 28, 2003
7,055
30
Round Rock, TX US
jrv331 said:
What is the reccomended way of waterproofing outside RG6 connections?
Thanks
John
When I had A1 Satellite out here to install 2 more coax's (one for the 2nd tuner for my 721, and one to move
the 501 to another room), they put some sort of rubber grommet on the SW64 inputs for all the inputs (which was NOT done
by DNSC when they installed the original SW64 on SHIVIA day).

This looks like it MIGHT prevent me from going through another SW64 (I'm on my 3rd or 4th).

You might want to look into it.

LER
 

boba

SatelliteGuys Master
Dec 12, 2003
11,351
1,033
Dorchester, TX.
The best way to waterproof outside fittings is to start out with the right fittings, fittings that are designed to be waterproof. If you used inside fittings you are not out of luck,back in the days of "C"band we used a product "COAX-SEAL" to seal fittings. This is a black flexible tar like tape that works, I have removed it 10 years after installation and still had shiny copper wire. I think it is available at Radio Shack. There is also silicon greases that are used to fill the fittings that keep water out.
 

Mike500

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 7, 2003
1,338
0
Thiepval
First, I'd either place all connections in a weatherproof box, like these sold on eBay;

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=32843&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=32843&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1

If you do not enclose everything in weatherproof enclosures, I'd at lease mount all connections horizontally with the coax slanted downward, so that water does not flow into the connection.

For really good longevity, I'd use environmentally seal connectors like these Snap-N-Seal ones. Again, on eBay;

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...&category=11726&sspagename=STRK:MESSE:IT&rd=1

And, I place a dab of 100% non-hardening silicone grease on the center wire, before putting it into the socket. The 11-18 vDC current of the lnb switting voltage from the receiver make even water vapor at this point especially vulnerable.

Rubber or plastic boots are moisture collectors from rain and condensation and might even be harmful to the connection. I only use them for TV antennas or connections, when the coax goes downward from the connection, so any trapped moisture flows out of them.

The cable companies have learned from years of experience. They enclose as many connectors as possible in weatherproof boxes, and use the best enviornmentally sealed connectors. They have to service them for 10+ to 30 years in the future.

Satellite fulfillment installers care only that the install last not much longer than the chargeback period, and use only parts and connections that at least last that long.

Just like anything else, "You pay a little extra, now. Or, you pay a lot more later." If you plan to keep satellite for more than a year, you should consider the options I recommend. A DP34 switch lists for $119.99, not including shipping and installation. If one goes bad, on account of corroded connections, you'd have to replace them. Hopefully, there is enough slack in the coax, or the coax, too, will need replacement. Also, water can travel all the way down inside the coax.
 

bradleys

SatelliteGuys Pro
Oct 10, 2003
237
0
Seattle / Blaine / Port McNeill
I use Vaseline petroleum jelly. I buy it in the squeeze tubes. They put a nice toothpaste-sized dollup of the jelly in the cable connector. Using a wrench to tighten down the connector squeezes the jelly out of the connection, eliminating any avenue for water.

My connections sit in the Seattle rain nine months a year. During the dry season, they also get drenched with sea water. My installation is on a boat. There are six total connections outside since I have an old Dish 500 setup and a separate 148 dish. I've never had a problem with my LNBs or cables.
 

jrv331

Thread Starter
SatelliteGuys Family
Feb 10, 2004
109
6
NE Ohio
I would have never thought of using that, but it does makes sense. Thanks to all for the help.
John

bradleys said:
I use Vaseline petroleum jelly. I buy it in the squeeze tubes. They put a nice toothpaste-sized dollup of the jelly in the cable connector. Using a wrench to tighten down the connector squeezes the jelly out of the connection, eliminating any avenue for water.

My connections sit in the Seattle rain nine months a year. During the dry season, they also get drenched with sea water. My installation is on a boat. There are six total connections outside since I have an old Dish 500 setup and a separate 148 dish. I've never had a problem with my LNBs or cables.
 

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