Can I connect a Hopper 3 to multiple Joeys through my home Ethernet network?

slackerUH

Thread Starter
Member
Jul 23, 2020
6
2
Arizona
I am looking to replace my current cable service from COX because they will only allow me to connect 4 ethernet/wifi boxes to my Panoramic Device. If I want more devices connected they require me to use coax. This is a billing issue not technical but they can't seem to work it out for me.
In another home, I have a Tivo Bolt VOX connected to 7 Tivo Mini's all through my home Ethernet network. I would like to do the same here without purchasing all of the Tivo equipment so I am considering DirecTV or DISH.

I am currently using Gocoax MoCA 2.5 adapters to bridge the ethernet network in my home. The Gocoax MoCA 2.5 adapters are supposed to operate at 2.5 Gbps but mine are showing 3.5 Gbps speeds which is either a good thing or a mistake.

This is how I would like to configure my network if I go the DISH route.

Network Closet
Hopper 3 -> Ethernet Switch (Also connected to COX Internet Router) -> MoCA 2.5 Adapter -> Coax Splitter

Living Room
Coax Splitter -> MoCa 2.5 Adapter -> Ethernet Switch -> (4K Joey, Ruckus Access Point, Smart TV)

Master Bedroom
Coax Splitter -> MoCa 2.5 Adapter -> Ethernet Switch -> (4K Joey, Ruckus Access Point, Smart TV)

Upstairs Living Room
Coax Splitter -> MoCa 2.5 Adapter -> Ethernet Switch -> (4K Joey, Ruckus Access Point, Smart TV)

There will also be a 4th and 5th Joey. One will be connected directly to the Ethernet switch where the Hopper 3 is located and the other will connect wireless to the Hopper 3.

Will this configuration work?

I tried calling DISH sales and they were not sure about it and online searches are giving me conflicting information.
 

dtgoodtonid

Member
Dec 7, 2010
6
2
Lexington KY
Ethernet absolutely works. I have a Hopper3, 2 Joey 3.0, 1 4K Joey, and a wireless Joey. The only coax is from the LNB to the Hopper. I don't remember if I use Ethernet Top or Bottom, doesn't matter. I only use Gb switches. This setup works perfectly. I don't think Dish, for whatever reason, offers support for this type of setup. I have never seen a reason to change.
 
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az99

SatelliteGuys Pro
May 27, 2014
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I am a little confused. So you don't use an access point? How do you split the ethernet to go to all those locations?
 

dtgoodtonid

Member
Dec 7, 2010
6
2
Lexington KY
The reason I use switches at each Joey, Hopper whatever, if needed, is that I have multiple devices connecting to the internet. I found that Gb switches are the only ones to use. Here goes..

The Hopper3 connects to an 8 port Gb switch. That switch goes to a 16 port switch. The 16 port switch connects to a wireless router, did I say Gb?, which connects to the modem. All of these connections are by ethernet.

All of the Joeys end up going through the 16 port switch by ethernet, via another switch where necessary. Necessary only applies if there is more than 1 device that I want connected to the internet where a particular Joey is, which would require a switch. It works the same regardless, switch at each Joey or not.

The only coax is from the LNB to the router, everything else is by ethernet. I have been using this setup since I got the Hopper3, which was ordered literally the 1st day available and installed by Dish maybe 2 days later. I will say, Only 1 local Dish tech has been able to understand this concept, not sure why because it is really simple.

I will also say this, I have had Roku since the 1st Gen. It's a great product and I have one on each of my TVs. I also have Apple TV, and I have Kinetic Streaming service. I have, like many of you, stayed in Hotels that have cable service or some have DTV. My Father In Law had ATT Uverse. The local service in Lexington is Spectrum. NONE of these hold a candle to Dish. You can take that down to the remotes. Dish is THE premium service and I don't mind telling the reps when I call that I am a satisfied Dish customer. Nothing I have seen compares to the Hopper3.

I have had Dish for almost 18 years. I do not know Charlie so I am not sucking up!
 

HipKat

SatelliteGuys Master
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Aug 25, 2017
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Pekin, IL
The reason I use switches at each Joey, Hopper whatever, if needed, is that I have multiple devices connecting to the internet. I found that Gb switches are the only ones to use. Here goes..

The Hopper3 connects to an 8 port Gb switch. That switch goes to a 16 port switch. The 16 port switch connects to a wireless router, did I say Gb?, which connects to the modem. All of these connections are by ethernet.

All of the Joeys end up going through the 16 port switch by ethernet, via another switch where necessary. Necessary only applies if there is more than 1 device that I want connected to the internet where a particular Joey is, which would require a switch. It works the same regardless, switch at each Joey or not.

The only coax is from the LNB to the router, everything else is by ethernet. I have been using this setup since I got the Hopper3, which was ordered literally the 1st day available and installed by Dish maybe 2 days later. I will say, Only 1 local Dish tech has been able to understand this concept, not sure why because it is really simple.

I will also say this, I have had Roku since the 1st Gen. It's a great product and I have one on each of my TVs. I also have Apple TV, and I have Kinetic Streaming service. I have, like many of you, stayed in Hotels that have cable service or some have DTV. My Father In Law had ATT Uverse. The local service in Lexington is Spectrum. NONE of these hold a candle to Dish. You can take that down to the remotes. Dish is THE premium service and I don't mind telling the reps when I call that I am a satisfied Dish customer. Nothing I have seen compares to the Hopper3.

I have had Dish for almost 18 years. I do not know Charlie so I am not sucking up!
You don't have Coax to your Hopper?? I was under the impression that the only receivers that could get signal via IP were the Wally and Hopper Duo
 

dtgoodtonid

Member
Dec 7, 2010
6
2
Lexington KY
I think it's worth noting that my house does not have a finished basement which means I can easily run wires, which I have.

I have never had the need to see if using a wireless adapter in each Joey and the Hopper would work. My suspicion is that it would. I think you would log each one into the modem which would put them on the same subnet. I would be interested if anyone has tried this.
 

Cesar_ser_4

Member
Jun 8, 2017
11
12
Washington
My only experience with this set up was that when I got the hopper installed in my house, the technician installed one of the joeys wrong. He used the wrong cable going from the switch to the joey and it ended up getting the signal from the ethernet cable which I attached on a whim. The way it was set up was my hopper is attached to a 8 port Gb switch which goes to my wireless router. The joey was attached to a 4 port network bridge that has 300 mbps connection to my wireless router but only has 10/100 mbps ethernet ports. The only reason we found out that it was wrongfully set up was when the bridge lost connection to my router. Had to have a tech come out and just connect the right coax cable to the switch. It was then that it finally made sense why the tech that installed the hopper had to connect the joey directly to the hopper to activate it.

Didn’t really notice a difference in performance. Although having taken a break from dish to go to Dtv and recently coming back made me realize how slow the Joey2s are compared to the genie minis.
 

slackerUH

Thread Starter
Member
Jul 23, 2020
6
2
Arizona
The reason I use switches at each Joey, Hopper whatever, if needed, is that I have multiple devices connecting to the internet. I found that Gb switches are the only ones to use. Here goes..

The Hopper3 connects to an 8 port Gb switch. That switch goes to a 16 port switch. The 16 port switch connects to a wireless router, did I say Gb?, which connects to the modem. All of these connections are by ethernet.

All of the Joeys end up going through the 16 port switch by ethernet, via another switch where necessary. Necessary only applies if there is more than 1 device that I want connected to the internet where a particular Joey is, which would require a switch. It works the same regardless, switch at each Joey or not.

The only coax is from the LNB to the router, everything else is by ethernet. I have been using this setup since I got the Hopper3, which was ordered literally the 1st day available and installed by Dish maybe 2 days later. I will say, Only 1 local Dish tech has been able to understand this concept, not sure why because it is really simple.

I will also say this, I have had Roku since the 1st Gen. It's a great product and I have one on each of my TVs. I also have Apple TV, and I have Kinetic Streaming service. I have, like many of you, stayed in Hotels that have cable service or some have DTV. My Father In Law had ATT Uverse. The local service in Lexington is Spectrum. NONE of these hold a candle to Dish. You can take that down to the remotes. Dish is THE premium service and I don't mind telling the reps when I call that I am a satisfied Dish customer. Nothing I have seen compares to the Hopper3.

I have had Dish for almost 18 years. I do not know Charlie so I am not sucking up!
Thanks for the response. I'm confident my proposed configuration will work now.
 
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crodrules

The Happy Pessimist
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Jun 14, 2014
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You don't have Coax to your Hopper?? I was under the impression that the only receivers that could get signal via IP were the Wally and Hopper Duo
This is the first I have heard of that, and I have been using Wally and Hopper Duo receivers since the Hopper Duo first became available. Are you saying that they can get all of the channels in the programming package through the internet connection? Does this work via WiFi, or does it require an ethernet cable? In any event, I am very surprised to find out that the Wally and Hopper Duo are capable of something that the Hopper 3 cannot do.
 
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HipKat

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This is the first I have heard of that, and I have been using Wally and Hopper Duo receivers since the Hopper Duo first became available. Are you saying that they can get all of the channels in the programming package through the internet connection? Does this work via WiFi, or does it require an ethernet cable? In any event, I am very surprised to find out that the Wally and Hopper Duo are capable of something that the Hopper 3 cannot do.
I should’ve clarified that those won’t work off of a home Wi-Fi system. Those are the only receivers that work on the new Dish fiber technology. But yeah, they do something the other hoppers don’t!
 
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crodrules

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I should’ve clarified that those won’t work off of a home Wi-Fi system. Those are the only receivers that work on the new Dish fiber technology. But yeah, they do something the other hoppers don’t!
Okay, that explains it. All of mine were connected by Wi-Fi. (I am now down to just one Hopper Duo that is still hooked up to the satellite system.) My sister's Wally is connected to the internet with an ethernet cable. So, are you saying that she could unhook the satellite input cable, and still receive all of her programming?
 

TheKrell

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My sister's Wally is connected to the internet with an ethernet cable. So, are you saying that she could unhook the satellite input cable, and still receive all of her programming?
I think HipKat is saying that she must have "the new Dish fiber technology" before that would work. I am still scratching my head over what Dish fiber technology is, and who can get it.
 

HipKat

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I think HipKat is saying that she must have "the new Dish fiber technology" before that would work. I am still scratching my head over what Dish fiber technology is, and who can get it.
It's still in a testing stage, mostly, and I might get some details slightly wrong.

I have 2 Mobile Home parks in my region that I service (I'm the primary tech for Dish Fiber in our office).
I don't have a pic, but a large - larger than a 102mm - square dish is erected with 3 LNB's for each Western Arc Sat. Also is a large OTA Antenna for local channels and another to pick up 5G Data from the cell towers. (Welcome to the early stages of the future of Dish).

Via RG11, signals are routed into a control room and through a series of switches and smart boxes, RG6 coax is run to each unit. In the house is a Hitron Modem and Ruckus access point with 4 Ethernet Ports. The park offers and collects in lot rent 35 channels via coax and WiFi via the access point, In one park, D/L speeds average about 500 MB/s.

If they choose, they can add additional video via Wally or Hopper Duo/Joey combos. The Wallys and Hoppers are connected to the Access Points with Ethernet and get signal via IP/Headend.

Here's the good part. For Hoppers, coax runs out of the receiver's coax input to the Host Port on a Solo Hub, and the Joey connect via Coax to the Client port of the Hub. I have a pending New Connect - 5 rooms - 3 Hopper Duos and 2 Joeys. I've also done multiple Wally installs, each connected to the Access Point by Cat 5. It's still buggy, but we're getting there.

Moving forward, I can see this setup as highly desirable in Multi Dwelling Units, Sub Divisions, etc. as the technology develops.
 

Cesar_ser_4

Member
Jun 8, 2017
11
12
Washington
It's still in a testing stage, mostly, and I might get some details slightly wrong.

I have 2 Mobile Home parks in my region that I service (I'm the primary tech for Dish Fiber in our office).
I don't have a pic, but a large - larger than a 102mm - square dish is erected with 3 LNB's for each Western Arc Sat. Also is a large OTA Antenna for local channels and another to pick up 5G Data from the cell towers. (Welcome to the early stages of the future of Dish).

Via RG11, signals are routed into a control room and through a series of switches and smart boxes, RG6 coax is run to each unit. In the house is a Hitron Modem and Ruckus access point with 4 Ethernet Ports. The park offers and collects in lot rent 35 channels via coax and WiFi via the access point, In one park, D/L speeds average about 500 MB/s.

If they choose, they can add additional video via Wally or Hopper Duo/Joey combos. The Wallys and Hoppers are connected to the Access Points with Ethernet and get signal via IP/Headend.

Here's the good part. For Hoppers, coax runs out of the receiver's coax input to the Host Port on a Solo Hub, and the Joey connect via Coax to the Client port of the Hub. I have a pending New Connect - 5 rooms - 3 Hopper Duos and 2 Joeys. I've also done multiple Wally installs, each connected to the Access Point by Cat 5. It's still buggy, but we're getting there.

Moving forward, I can see this setup as highly desirable in Multi Dwelling Units, Sub Divisions, etc. as the technology develops.
Wouldn’t that have to be it’s own network though? or at least have everything hardwired. I’d imagine it generates quite a bit of traffic to still have to deal with internet. I was told that to have the joeys receive the signal over ethernet i had to have 50mbps connection between devices.
 

crodrules

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It's still in a testing stage, mostly, and I might get some details slightly wrong.

I have 2 Mobile Home parks in my region that I service (I'm the primary tech for Dish Fiber in our office).
I don't have a pic, but a large - larger than a 102mm - square dish is erected with 3 LNB's for each Western Arc Sat. Also is a large OTA Antenna for local channels and another to pick up 5G Data from the cell towers. (Welcome to the early stages of the future of Dish).
...
Now, if they could use that 5G data to provide accurate guide information for all of the OTA channels, then we would be all set. :heartbeat
 
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HipKat

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Wouldn’t that have to be it’s own network though? or at least have everything hardwired. I’d imagine it generates quite a bit of traffic to still have to deal with internet. I was told that to have the joeys receive the signal over ethernet i had to have 50mbps connection between devices.
The part I forgot is the Network in the Park is a Mesh Network. Each Unit has it's own password, but can remain connected at any part of the property and I have NO idea how that works./ In this situation, the Joeys are connected by Coax. Not sure if they would work the same over IP. It would be cool to try it
 
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bookworm370

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Jul 11, 2009
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I just saw this and it could be a very good thing!

If the Joey can get the signal off any Ethernet connection in which the Hopper is also on the network, it means I can take a Joey from, say the kitchen, to the outside enclosed porch and view everything on that TV!

This could be very cool. After I'm done with a few projects, I'm going to give it a go. Will let you know....
 
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slackerUH

Thread Starter
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Jul 23, 2020
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Arizona
Now I just need to figure out how to order from DISH. When I call in, they get very confused when I say that I need to connects all of the Joey devices to my home Ethernet network. I'm thinking that I need a Hopper 3, 3-Joey 3's, and a 1 Wireless Joey.
 
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