Can't reset soft limits... actuator problem?

Titanium

Titanium

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No reply yet to my testing question in post #8. Is the sensor (reed switch) providing open/close cycles (pulse counts) when moving the motor with the 12Vdc battery?

7 - 10Vdc on the ASC1 terminals S1/S2? Great! The circuit is working. I agree with Arlo... NO NEED TO OPEN THE ASC1. The sensor power is working properly.

We previously verified the M1/M2 motor power is working. I agree with Arlo... NO NEED TO OPEN THE ASC1. The relays are working properly.
 
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northgeorgia

northgeorgia

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I am appreciative of everyone's help, but it will take me some time to try these suggestions out. I'm currently 50 miles away from home. Once I do get back, the only way I can get help with the 12v battery going while using the meter on the reed switch is with my father, who just had open heart surgery in January, so we'll get it checked out eventually. I just wanted to clarify why it's taking some time for me to attempt these suggestions and don't want anyone to feel offended. Thank you so much. I look forward to seeing what happens.
 
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northgeorgia

northgeorgia

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OK, don't groan too loudly... but the problem has been discovered. It's a little embarrassing!

The time away helped me calmly rethink everything. On a hunch, I brought out the extension cords, the V-box, and some good quality smaller gauge wire to the actuator. Let's give it a go. Yes! Movement! It was the wiring all along. Although I used the multimeter and got a reading, I am so inexperienced, I probably didn't do it correctly. And getting so wrapped up in the technical stuff made me forget the simple things... Now which wire was it? I have looked at the sensor wires over and over again. They seem in pristine condition. I looked more carefully at the motor wires. I followed it along to the ground, where the recent warm weather and rains have made the weeds start to grow tall. I pushed the grass away and lifted the wires up, and there it was. A chipmunk must have munched into the insulation and exposed the wiring sometime over the winter, causing moisture to get in and leaving corrosion behind -- all several feet away from the actuator in the positive wire to the motor. I had just enough extra unburied wiring at the dish to splice the better parts of the wiring together until I can afford more time to properly redo it. Hooked it up to the V-box and STB inside, and works like a charm. But, I do appreciate all the suggestions. I just should have double checked the simple things. Still, I'm not sad I played with a multimeter and practiced replacing a sensor. Those skills will be useful again.

So, two less serious questions:

1. What might be a good protective barrier against critters who like to eat wiring? I am thinking along the lines of PVC pipes and insulation... but then there's the problem with water and ice getting in there. Ideas?

2. I've just been connecting wire directly into the terminals of the ASC1 and the actuator, but would feel better if I had some terminal connectors heat shrunk on the end of the wires. What would the "stud number" be on the ASC1? These are #8s for example: 50 Heat Shrink Spade Fork Terminal Connector Blue 16-14 GA AWG Gauge #8 Stud | eBay
 
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A

arlo

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OK, don't groan too loudly... but the problem has been discovered. It's a little embarrassing!

The time away helped me calmly rethink everything. On a hunch, I brought out the extension cords, the V-box, and some good quality smaller gauge wire to the actuator. Let's give it a go. Yes! Movement! It was the wiring all along. Although I used the multimeter and got a reading, I am so inexperienced, I probably didn't do it correctly. And getting so wrapped up in the technical stuff made me forget the simple things... Now which wire was it? I have looked at the sensor wires over and over again. They seem in pristine condition. I looked more carefully at the motor wires. I followed it along to the ground, where the recent warm weather and rains have made the weeds start to grow tall. I pushed the grass away and lifted the wires up, and there it was. A chipmunk must have munched into the insulation and exposed the wiring sometime over the winter, causing moisture to get in and leaving corrosion behind -- all several feet away from the actuator in the positive wire to the motor. I had just enough extra unburied wiring at the dish to splice the better parts of the wiring together until I can afford more time to properly redo it. Hooked it up to the V-box and STB inside, and works like a charm. But, I do appreciate all the suggestions. I just should have double checked the simple things. Still, I'm not sad I played with a multimeter and practiced replacing a sensor. Those skills will be useful again.

So, two less serious questions:

1. What might be a good protective barrier against critters who like to eat wiring? I am thinking along the lines of PVC pipes and insulation... but then there's the problem with water and ice getting in there. Ideas?

2. I've just been connecting wire directly into the terminals of the ASC1 and the actuator, but would feel better if I had some terminal connectors heat shrunk on the end of the wires. What would the "stud number" be on the ASC1? These are #8s for example: 50 Heat Shrink Spade Fork Terminal Connector Blue 16-14 GA AWG Gauge #8 Stud | eBay
1647608282484
These are what I use at my dish for the cables that run to the house. They are inserted in a weatherproof Carlon junction box. "Strain relief cord grip". Your local electrical supply can hook you up and they have lots of sizes. All the cables are run in PVC that's been in the dirt since the mid 80's. So I don't think water intrusion is a big deal. The pipe is 1-1/4". Some assembly and fittings required. And hole drilling.

Glad you found the problem. I don't really know the size of connectors you would use at the controller. I just tinned the wire ends and stuck them in the terminal strips. So far so good. I guess you could take a chunk of copper wire and bend it in a U shape and take it along to the electrical supply, auto parts, or hardware store.

Now you have a multimeter at least you can sort out that box of old batteries that are iffy.
They are a handy thing to have around. Just remember. You can't really screw one up in voltage mode.
In Ohms and amps...well, Ohms doesn't like any voltage on the leads. And amps, don't stick your leads in a wall socket or across the Ford battery. You'll find out why fast. And. If it uses a battery (digital). Keep a danged good one in it.

Maybe this will be good reference for others in the same situation.
 
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primestar31

primestar31

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1. What might be a good protective barrier against critters who like to eat wiring? I am thinking along the lines of PVC pipes and insulation... but then there's the problem with water and ice getting in there. Ideas?
Black poly coiled pipe. You can buy it fairly cheap at Lowes or Home Depot. Even protects against wives with shovels, lol.
 
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