CEA Redefines "Ultra-HD" (1 Viewer)

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dfergie

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New York—In an effort to reduce consumer confusion, The Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) has announced updated core characteristics for what "Ultra High-Definition (UHD)" TV should mean when you buy a CE product that heretofore has been sold as "4K." As devised and approved by CEA's Video Division Board, these characteristics build on the first-generation UHD characteristics released by the CEA in October 2012 that offered a similar 3840x 2160 resolution for broadcast.

Under CEA's expanded characteristics, a TV, monitor or projector may be referred to as Ultra High-Definition if it meets the following minimum performance attributes:

Display Resolution – Has at least eight million active pixels, with at least 3840 horizontally and at least 2160 vertically.

Aspect Ratio – Has a width to height ratio of the display's native resolution of 16:9 or wider.

Upconversion – Is capable of upscaling HD video and displaying it at Ultra High-Definition resolution.

Digital Input – Has one or more HDMI inputs supporting at least 3840×2160 native content resolution at 24p, 30p and 60p frames per second. At least one of the 3840×2160 HDMI inputs shall support HDCP revision 2.2 or equivalent content protection.

Colorimetry – Processes 2160p video inputs encoded according to ITU-R BT.709 color space and may support wider colorimetry standards.

Bit Depth – Has a minimum color bit depth of eight bits.

Because one of the first ways consumers will have access to native 4K content is via Internet streaming on "connected" Ultra HDTVs, the CEA has defined new characteristics for Connected Ultra High-Definition displays. Under these new characteristics, which the CEA said complement the updated core UHD attributes, a display system may be referred to as a Connected Ultra HD device if it meets the following minimum performance attributes:

Ultra High-Definition Capability – Meets all of the requirements of the CEA Ultra High-Definition Display Characteristics V2 (listed above).

Video Codec – Decodes IP-delivered video of 3840×2160 resolution that has been compressed using HEVC and may decode video from other standard encoders.

Audio Codec – Receives and reproduces, and/or outputs multichannel audio.

IP and Networking – Receives IP-delivered Ultra HD video through a Wi-Fi, Ethernet or other appropriate connection.

Application Services – Supports IP-delivered Ultra HD video through services or applications on the platform of the manufacturer's choosing.

Source & More: tvtechnology.com
 
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navychop

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I am HIGHLY disappointed that they did not go with 2020 and 10 bit.

Always finding a way to chisel away, a little cheaper, a little shoddier. These folks would put a four banger in a Rolls.


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Jimbo

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I am HIGHLY disappointed that they did not go with 2020 and 10 bit.

Always finding a way to chisel away, a little cheaper, a little shoddier. These folks would put a four banger in a Rolls.


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This is so More companies can get into the game ...

Instead of having a few companies that make stunning TV's, you'll have them and a bunch of others that have UHD sets that don't look as good as they could/should for a cheaper price.

Personally, I was floored to see some of the first ones out going for under 3,000 .... several years ago you wouldn't get a good 1080p for under that.
 
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Tampa8

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You're both right! It does seem like they are allowing something to be called UHD that isn't quite up to the standards many thought it would be. But to allow more TV's to be available they lowered the standard. That's done with good intentions, but the marketplace would as it almost always does take care of that. As more are made the cost comes down. So they are only making more available for a short term. Of course that relies on less people out of work (we are at all time highs) and the economy coming back.
 

tigerfan33

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I am HIGHLY disappointed that they did not go with 2020 and 10 bit.

Always finding a way to chisel away, a little cheaper, a little shoddier. These folks would put a four banger in a Rolls.


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Joe Kane has said it would not be possible to go rec. 2020.
Somewhat higher than 709 yes.
I find it disappointing also there is nothing on high dynamic range. Supposedly the real game changer.
HDR does need 10 bit panel to support it.
I would think for the near future most will still produce 8 bit panels.
Vizio R series supposedly will be 10 bit when it arrives later this fall.


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navychop

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I respect Joe Kane. But I have t heard that elsewhere.

It seems they are reaching for the lowest common denominator, even for a supposed top end product.


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navychop

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That would be devious.

Oh, yeah - right.


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