Diplexer Setup (1 Viewer)

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drahgun

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 9, 2009
5
0
Texas
Hello everyone,

I am looking to set up an external antenna to my existing setup.
My existing setup is 2 VIP722 DVRs with HD Programming, 4 room setup. I have went and bought 4 Holland DPD2 Diplexers. I was hoping to possibly get OTA on both receivers. I will start from the sat to reciever. I have 2 diplexers installed before the cable from the satellite reaches the grounder. Sat cable is connected to Sat port on diplexer. I then have the diplxers connected with a 3 foot cable to the grounder. Those cables are connected the the one port side IN/OUT. From there the cable runs all the way to the receivers where the other 2 diplexer are installed. I have the cables connected to the single port side IN/OUT on those diplexers. I then have 3 foot cables connected on the Sat port to the splitter which dish had installed. Is this the correct way to set this up? I get no signal on the screen. I am using all RG6 cable. Not sure what else to do. If anybody can help or guide me through this I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks in advanced.
 
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Skibum

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 8, 2008
682
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Bozeman, MT
Rather, here. Photoshopped something up from other pdf's right quick.
 

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drahgun

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 9, 2009
5
0
Texas
Making Progress

I had the same setup as the picture. I tried the second receiver and it worked like a charm. I think I may have some cable running to the other receiver ,(the one I have been testing with), that is not rated to 2150 mhz, so I am going to try and replace it tomorrow and see what happens. Thanks.
 
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drahgun

Thread Starter
Member
Jan 9, 2009
5
0
Texas
Up and Running

When I exteneded my RG6 on one of the runs, appearently the coax I got was only rated to 1000. Today I went out and bought some RG6U that said on the cable it was rated 2350. That solved my issue and now I can watch Local HD channels free. I appreciate the reply and hopefully this helps others. Thanks again.
 

PBX_Guy

SatelliteGuys Family
Dec 27, 2008
105
0
Texas
When I exteneded my RG6 on one of the runs, appearently the coax I got was only rated to 1000. Today I went out and bought some RG6U that said on the cable it was rated 2350. That solved my issue and now I can watch Local HD channels free. I appreciate the reply and hopefully this helps others. Thanks again.
Most likely the previous cable was simply defective, shorted or one or both of the connectors were defective or improperly installed.

RG6 is RG6. Whether it says "sweep tested" or whatever on the jacket is of no consequence. I say again, of no consequence. RG6 is RG6. I would agree that there may be "better quality" RG6 from a grade of materials standpoint available from premium manufacturers such as Belden, Times Wire & Cable, Commscope or Andrew, but aside from that all RG6 whether std. shield, tri-shield, quad-shield, digital-video rated, air plenum-rated, flooded, messenger, siamese, or any combination has the approximate same RF signal propagation characteristics. If you have coaxial cable which exhibits substantially different signal propagation (loss) characteristics than RG6, then it's not RG6. All RG6 has virtually identical RF signal propagation characteristics. "RG" stands for "Radio Grade" and the designation "6" refers to its physical construction parameters. Among these "parameters" is a solid 18 gauge center conductor (wire). All RG6 has an 18-gauga center conductor. The center conductor may be solid copper or copper-clad steel, but this difference has no effect on the RF signal attenuation (loss) or its suitability for use at any specific frequency or band of frequencies.

"Sweep-tested" RG6 cable means simply that it's been tested. It does not mean that it has been manufacturerd to any different tolerances than any other ordinary off-the-spool RG6.

To say that you must have a specific type of RG6 for use with the DBS satellite services is also nonsense. The only parameter which may be of possible concern would be whether the cable has a solid copper center conductor or a copper-clad steel center conductor. The solid copper is better in applications where a "control voltage" is being passed over the cable to control a multiswitch or to power an inline amplifier or an LNB. But even in these applications, the solid copper center conductor is only useful for long cable runs (typically those over 100 feet) and has nothing to do with the receive signal level or the frequency of signal it will pass.
 

PBX_Guy

SatelliteGuys Family
Dec 27, 2008
105
0
Texas
It's marketing hype. They both use "sweep-tested" but otherwise plain, ordinary RG6 with the exact same RF signal loss characteristics as the stuff you can buy at Radios Hack, Home Depot, Lowes, etc. RG6 is RG6, period. Look up the frequency & loss characteristics.

Boys and girls, listen to me. I have nothing to gain by lying to you. I am telling you the truth. I promise you by all things holy, there is no difference in the signal propagation characteristics. The stuff at Radios Hack, etc will pass a 3000 Mhz signal equally well as the stuff coming off the spool in the back of the satellite truck.

The only possible difference would be that one might have a solid copper center conductor, but from a signal standpoint the cables are identical. Don't buy into this hype others are feeding you. (for goodness sake don't buy Monster Cable either)

RG6 coax, no matter who makes it, no matter what it says on the jacket and no matter whether it has a solid copper 18guage center conductor or a copper-clad steel 18 guage center conductor, is still RG6. ALL RG6 coax (in good condition) will exhibit approx 11.45 db loss per 100 ft at 3,000 Mhz That's just the nature of RG6. (RG59, by comparison exhibits approx 14.29 db of loss at 3000 Mhz).

If you're looking for good coax for a greater distance, consider RG 7 (9 db loss per 100 ft @ 3000 Mhz) or RG 11 (7.8 db loss per 100 ft @ 3000 Mhz)

RG6 coax marked or stampped as being "certified to 3000 Mhz" is the exact same coax it was before the manufacturer put those markings on it. It is not manufacturered to any higher quality standards. It's RG6!!!
 

dirtydee

New Member
Jan 10, 2009
2
0
louisiana
losing signal and is a long run.

good subject had a problem over 150 ft run what should i do for lost
signal over time like every 5 min. cable is rg7,one union,in line.
 
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PBX_Guy

SatelliteGuys Family
Dec 27, 2008
105
0
Texas
good subject had a problem over 150 ft run what should i do for lost
signal over time like every 5 min. cable is rg7,one union,in line.
If things were originally OK and as you say over time have deteriorated, there are several things to check
  • Start by disconnecting the coax from the receiver (to remove the voltage from the line)
  • Then take the coupling (union) apart and look for corrosion or evidence of moisture.
  • Use a pocket knife to scrape the center conductor (should be clean and bright)
  • Apply silicone grease to the threads (only) and wrench tighten (not overly tight, but more than just finger tight)
  • similarly, check the connectors at the antenna (dish) and the receiver
  • Similarly, check connectors at the ground block, also check the ground block itself for moisture or corrosion
  • Check the alignment of your antenna (dish) & rigidity of the mount
  • on satellite systems check the face of the LNB for cracks or damage; replace the LNB if damaged
  • also check for new tree or shrubbery growth into your signal path.
Can coax go bad? Yes, over time it can. However, the most common cause is damage. Moisture can seep into the cable at the connector or at any location where the outer jacket has been abraded or punctured. Also look for any sharp bends or points along the cable that have been stapled down or any kinks. Any pinch-point or sharp bend can (over time) cause the center conductor to migrate, affecting the impedance and loss characteristics. Never use a staple gun to attach coaxial cable to rafters or studs, floor joists, etc. Never use a auto-tensioning type of tie-wrap gun to cinch-down cable ties (ie, don't mash or crush the cable) Occasionally just the simple act of unscrewing the connector, unplugging it and then plugging it back in and retightening it can clear up a problem. Coax that's allowed to lay on the roof may over time get abrasion damage from the friction of the wind blowing it around on the shingles.

If signals are coming and going every few minutes, you may have an intermittent problem such as a loose connector (either loose threads or loose connector installation on the coax itself.)

If your outside coax is 4 years old or older, consider replacing it, especially if it is buried underground. All coax used in direct burial (meaning not inside a conduit or raceway) should be "flooded coax". Flooded coax has a (patented) gooey waxy substance between the outer jacket and core sheath that is impervious to moisture. It can be quite messy to work with and unfortunately almost no one uses it.(compare to buried telephone cables which almost always use it) Never use colored (ie, white) coax in direct sunlight. It will deteriorate quickly.

During daylight hours certain times of the year it is common to experience solar fade. This phenomena occurs typically twice a year for a few minutes over a 2~3 day cycle when the sun is in precise compass alignment with the satellite. There is nothing you can do about this.

If yours is a new installation of an "Eastern Arc" system and you're experiencing periodic video breakup, contact Dish Network.
 
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