Dish approved to merge with EchoStar.

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So does this just prop up DiSH or bring the whole works down?
Band Aid, might make things a little easier to get a loan, but Dish still owes about $6-8 Billion in 2024, $3 Billion in spring time, so it will be tough.

But Echostar only has a market Cap of $1.14 Billion, but debt of $1.4 Billion

While Dish Network has a cap of $2.3 Billion, but debt of $20 Billion.


 
Band Aid, might make things a little easier to get a loan, but Dish still owes about $6-8 Billion in 2024, $3 Billion in spring time, so it will be tough.

But Echostar only has a market Cap of $1.14 Billion, but debt of $1.4 Billion

While Dish Network has a cap of $2.3 Billion, but debt of $20 Billion.


so Dish re-merged into it's parent company Echostar cause the streaming cord cutting movement and buying out Boost Mobile (and possibly the debts of Sprint) from T-mobile has pretty much killed Dish as a stand alone company and rather than file for bankruptcy, they decided to merge into the company it spun off of.

i think this will lead to the newly merged company into it's own chapter 11 bankruptcy filing in the next 2 years.

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Band Aid, might make things a little easier to get a loan, but Dish still owes about $6-8 Billion in 2024, $3 Billion in spring time, so it will be tough.

But Echostar only has a market Cap of $1.14 Billion, but debt of $1.4 Billion

While Dish Network has a cap of $2.3 Billion, but debt of $20 Billion.


The game is delay until revenue. They are effectively the kid in school doing all of their work at the very last second (in their case, they bit off more than they can chew, but have come a long way already). I won't rule Ergen out, though best to keep the bottles corked too. He knows every deadline probably for debt and every benchmark for the 5G rollout (and then there is the corporate sale avenue for 5G bandwidth). It'll be very hard, but he probably knows best how to manipulate every thing he can to pull something huge off.
 
The game is delay until revenue. They are effectively the kid in school doing all of their work at the very last second (in their case, they bit off more than they can chew, but have come a long way already). I won't rule Ergen out, though best to keep the bottles corked too. He knows every deadline probably for debt and every benchmark for the 5G rollout (and then there is the corporate sale avenue for 5G bandwidth). It'll be very hard, but he probably knows best how to manipulate every thing he can to pull something huge off.
His bandwidth isn't what the big boys want
 
The game is delay until revenue. They are effectively the kid in school doing all of their work at the very last second (in their case, they bit off more than they can chew, but have come a long way already). I won't rule Ergen out, though best to keep the bottles corked too. He knows every deadline probably for debt and every benchmark for the 5G rollout (and then there is the corporate sale avenue for 5G bandwidth). It'll be very hard, but he probably knows best how to manipulate every thing he can to pull something huge off.
Just a bad time to pull something big off, interest rates high, bond markets effectively closed, major debt coming due and the vultures seem to be circling, instead of making deals with Dish, they seem like they wish to wait and pick at the carcass .

And again, I thought acquiring the spectrum was a good idea, but no one could anticipated that we would have a pandemic, that would throw the global economy into what we have now.
 
Not talking Telecom, I'm talking about companies that could use the 5G for the company use. Ergen has his plan. He has come way too far to just give in. He has a large chasm to cross still.
Uhh..who else uses 5g spectrum...the c band stuff he uses for uplink could be huge money but the bargain basement spectrum he got at a steep discount is about as valuable as block buster as far as 5g goes...5g uses very short waves that don't Penitrate buildings well..hence they switched to c band spectrum for better coverage
 
I used to have 3 satellite TV services. Most here know about DirecTV and DishNetwork. How many recall the short lived VOOM network? Back in 2002? it was the first to offer HDTV beyond BluRay DVD. As the services began to get greedy I was forced to begin dropping them. Voom went out of business on their own. Next DirecTV just didn't offer any advantage over DishNetwork so I dropped DirecTV. Soon DishNetwork just got too expensive as well as the reliability was getting worse. Service went into the toilet locally and I ended up getting tired of rain storm blackouts. When AppleTV box was introduced, I cancelled my remaining satellite service. Now being in the city, I had access to excellent high speed internet and owning my own business, I qualified for a Comcast Business service so my bandwidth was guaranteed and service was handled within 3 hours of any outage. I also had my own AE to call when there was trouble. Unlike my neighbors who sometimes were out for 1-2 days, I never lost service year after year. Cost was under $100 a month, far cheaper than DishNetwork.

I sort of lost touch with the out of date satellite TV services and see them as a technology whose time has past. Then I saw this video pop up this evening on You Tube and was surprised to learn that Dish and Echostar want to merge in an effort to save the business. The video mentions Starlink as the nail in the coffin of these old Satellite TV companies. Starlink offers to the only remaining market that was left out of state of the art 4K HDTV from all the major programming services. I have no need for Starlink but I do question whether it still suffers the same problem I despised with Dish Network and DirecTV and that is rain blackouts. But for the rural resident who doesn't have access to high speed internet it may be the best option.

Here is the video I saw that perked up my interest in what's happening to the antiquated Satellite TV company:


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FSeC5O8W88
 
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I used to have 3 satellite TV services. Most here know about DirecTV and DishNetwork. How many recall the short lived VOOM network? Back in 2002? it was the first to offer HDTV beyond BluRay DVD. As the services began to get greedy I was forced to begin dropping them. Voom went out of business on their own. Next DirecTV just didn't offer any advantage over DishNetwork so I dropped DirecTV. Soon DishNetwork just got too expensive as well as the reliability was getting worse. Service went into the toilet locally and I ended up getting tired of rain storm blackouts. When AppleTV box was introduced, I cancelled my remaining satellite service. Now being in the city, I had access to excellent high speed internet and owning my own business, I qualified for a Comcast Business service so my bandwidth was guaranteed and service was handled within 3 hours of any outage. I also had my own AE to call when there was trouble. Unlike my neighbors who sometimes were out for 1-2 days, I never lost service year after year. Cost was under $100 a month, far cheaper than DishNetwork.

I sort of lost touch with the out of date satellite TV services and see them as a technology whose time has past. Then I saw this video pop up this evening on You Tube and was surprised to learn that Dish and Echostar want to merge in an effort to save the business. The video mentions Starlink as the nail in the coffin of these old Satellite TV companies. Starlink offers to the only remaining market that was left out of state of the art 4K HDTV from all the major programming services. I have no need for Starlink but I do question whether it still suffers the same problem I despised with Dish Network and DirecTV and that is rain blackouts. But for the rural resident who doesn't have access to high speed internet it may be the best option.

Here is the video I saw that perked up my interest in what's happening to the antiquated Satellite TV company:


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FSeC5O8W88


Starlink sucks, many users are reporting DSL speeds.
 
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Starlink sucks, many users are reporting DSL speeds.
Not surprised a non-specific measure like "sucks" from you. Unlike DishNetwork Starlink seems to be growing in popularity world wide. I have no experience with Starlink service speed but DSL around here is capable of UHD TV and multiplayer gaming. Here we can stream up to 5 devices of 4K UHD with no speed problems and I have the lowest tier from Comcast Business service. I actually don't know what that bandwidth is because it's never been an issue that I had to question.
 
  • Like
Reactions: charlesrshell
I used to have 3 satellite TV services. Most here know about DirecTV and DishNetwork. How many recall the short lived VOOM network? Back in 2002? it was the first to offer HDTV beyond BluRay DVD. As the services began to get greedy I was forced to begin dropping them. Voom went out of business on their own. Next DirecTV just didn't offer any advantage over DishNetwork so I dropped DirecTV. Soon DishNetwork just got too expensive as well as the reliability was getting worse. Service went into the toilet locally and I ended up getting tired of rain storm blackouts. When AppleTV box was introduced, I cancelled my remaining satellite service. Now being in the city, I had access to excellent high speed internet and owning my own business, I qualified for a Comcast Business service so my bandwidth was guaranteed and service was handled within 3 hours of any outage. I also had my own AE to call when there was trouble. Unlike my neighbors who sometimes were out for 1-2 days, I never lost service year after year. Cost was under $100 a month, far cheaper than DishNetwork.

I sort of lost touch with the out of date satellite TV services and see them as a technology whose time has past. Then I saw this video pop up this evening on You Tube and was surprised to learn that Dish and Echostar want to merge in an effort to save the business. The video mentions Starlink as the nail in the coffin of these old Satellite TV companies. Starlink offers to the only remaining market that was left out of state of the art 4K HDTV from all the major programming services. I have no need for Starlink but I do question whether it still suffers the same problem I despised with Dish Network and DirecTV and that is rain blackouts. But for the rural resident who doesn't have access to high speed internet it may be the best option.

Here is the video I saw that perked up my interest in what's happening to the antiquated Satellite TV company:


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FSeC5O8W88

Directv offered two distinct advantages over Dish, better picture quality and much better sports offerings. Those may not have mattered to you, but they did to me and many others.
 
Not surprised a non-specific measure like "sucks" from you. Unlike DishNetwork Starlink seems to be growing in popularity world wide. I have no experience with Starlink service speed but DSL around here is capable of UHD TV and multiplayer gaming. Here we can stream up to 5 devices of 4K UHD with no speed problems and I have the lowest tier from Comcast Business service. I actually don't know what that bandwidth is because it's never been an issue that I had to question.
Let's be clear, he said "DSL" and you are responding with the capabilities of "VDSL", a very different thing. DSL averages about 6Mbps while VDSL can reach 100Mbps. Not the same animal.