Dish receiver on a non interruptible power supply.

RONZ

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Any idea why dish receivers will not get signal while running on a non interruptible 120 volts ?
 

gws

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Any idea why dish receivers will not get signal while running on a non interruptible 120 volts ?
My 722 works just fine connected to a UPS. You don't happen to have the coax from the dish connected to the coax surge suppressor that was intended for an OTA antenna?
 
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bobvick

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You won't be able to run that coax though there is is not going to allow the higher frequency signals to pass through


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RONZ

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Nope just the Plug in the wall plugged into the UPS This only happened when the power went out
 

kwindrem

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Nope just the Plug in the wall plugged into the UPS This only happened when the power went out
I' have all my satellite receivers on UPS along with associated hard drives, ethernet switches and other audio/video gear and have not had any issues. I've been doing it that way for 10+ years.

Check to make sure you are plugged into a receptacle on the UPS that includes battery backup. Some receptacles on many are "surge only". I made that mistake a while back. It's easy to do.
 

Claude Greiner

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I've got all my Hoppers, switches and EHD's on APC UPS units to assure that recordings aren't interrupted when the power goes out until I can get the generator running. Been that way for years and works great.
I could care less about loosing recordings. It's the fact the power is cut suddenly and the potential surge when the power comes back on that bothers me.

I got mine on surge protectors also with a generator Just because of what I just mentioned.
 

bobvick

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Does your UPS show the voltage? If not, do you have a meter to see if the UPS is passing 120?


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wmw007

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Make sure your UPS does not put out square waves. These models are OK for lighting, but not electronic equipment.

Use a UPS with a "modified sine wave" or "true sine wave" output. Even "modified" might be iffy depending upon the quality of the power supply in the receiver.
 

kwindrem

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...It's the fact the power is cut suddenly and the potential surge when the power comes back on that bothers me.

I got mine on surge protectors also with a generator Just because of what I just mentioned.
Surge suppressors are intended to squelch very short transients and do very little to protect against potential over voltage (or under voltage) that can occur during power outages and restoration. Such voltage changes can last seconds and there's not enough energy capacity in the surge suppressor components to absorb that. Plus the over voltage would be far under what the surge suppressor voltage (typically several hundred volts). A UPS that is designed to deal with over and under voltage is your best protection.

Another potential failure mode is hard drive corruption if the power is interrupted while a write operation is in progress, although Unix file systems like the one used on Dish receivers are capable of recovery from such an interruption.
 

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