Dumb ?: Why doesn't Dish build wifi into receivers?

Hall

Hall

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Feb 14, 2004
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That makes very little sense. They build in Ethernet ports, so if the user has a properly functioning router...
You said "if" and that's where Dish stops. *If* everything is configured properly with the user's router even then, the most troubleshooting Dish will do is "try a different ethernet cable", "make sure it's plugging in properly" and "let's reset the connection" on the Dish receiver. If none of those work, you're SOL.

Now, switch it to wireless.... Is the signal strong enough ? What encryption is being used ? What's the password or passphrase ? Remember, there's a reason most wireless networks in people's homes use "Linksys" or "default" as the SSID and they have *no* security in place !
 
T

The-P

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Aug 10, 2009
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well the wireless chipset is a bit more when it comes to $$$
I opened up my dell inspiron mini netbook the other day and found its wifi card to be very small(half the size of a business card)

the 922 needs to have wifi built into it since somehow it connects to a wifi monitor

it would be great if for current receivers dish would provide wireless receivers that connect to the back of the receiver via ethernet and every other receiver to have wifi from the get go.


Especially with the major push for connectivity. Wifi would save us Techs A lot of work.
 
tnsprin

tnsprin

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Remember when these Receivers were designed there was no need for ANY internet connection. They did include an internet connection anyway for future use, and finally enabled them first with minimum function and now with two real uses (remote access and dishonline). Also at the time wireless adapters were fairly expensive and wireless was not yet common in the average household.
 
dishcomm

dishcomm

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Nov 29, 2005
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That makes very little sense. They build in Ethernet ports, so if the user has a properly functioning router (which it is NOT Dish's responsibility to support) connecting via wireless would be no different than connecting via Ethernet. It would actually be LESS work than configuring a bridge, as the prospective wireless user must do now.

You must remeber this, when a tech installs this it is Dish's responsibility. Therefore any malfunction or user error would generate service calls and worse yet, trouble calls. No thanks.
 
B

belawrence

SatelliteGuys Guru
Jan 22, 2004
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Santee, CA
The reason its not built in is because they dont want to support people who can't figure out their wireless networks in their house.

I have seen wireless adapters made for Echostar and they have never been released due to this reason.
Amen. People's general misunderstanding of wifi configuration helps me put my kids thru college:)
 
TheKrell

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Remember, there's a reason most wireless networks in people's homes use "Linksys" or "default" as the SSID and they have *no* security in place !
Well there you go; you've proven Jim's point. If all the receiver has to do is connect up to an unencrypted access point, then it's actually easier than wired, and much easier than powerline.

By the way, I have some powerline adapters but I never plugged them in due to security concerns. Am I worried over nothing? For now, my wireless VIP receiver needs are met by one of these little cuties. It was a snap to set up. At least for me.
 
L

lwvmobile

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Apr 27, 2009
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Tallahassee Area
Forget wifi, how about a wireless connection to the LNB's, that way you could place your receiver anywhere in your house.

Of course, I realize the logistics for this are a nightmare. You still have to power the LNB, you will need a large about of bandwidth available to the LNB compared to what wireless g or wireless n uses. Not to mention signal strength nightmares.

But in the next 20 years or so it might be a possibility.
 
Scott Greczkowski

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Now, switch it to wireless.... Is the signal strong enough ? What encryption is being used ? What's the password or passphrase ? Remember, there's a reason most wireless networks in people's homes use "Linksys" or "default" as the SSID and they have *no* security in place !
This is the exact reason why no built in WIFI on Dish Receivers.
 
Dah-Henny

Dah-Henny

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May 12, 2007
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You must remeber this, when a tech installs this it is Dish's responsibility. Therefore any malfunction or user error would generate service calls and worse yet, trouble calls. No thanks.

That's too bad. I wish Dish would just do as my ISP does...ISP says, "We don't support anything having to do with a network. Set your network up at your own peril".
Geez, it took all of 5 minutes to configure wii to my wireless, security features and all. I guess one of these days I'll get motivated and get the 722 online. ;)
 
Hall

Hall

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Feb 14, 2004
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Germantown OH
Well there you go; you've proven Jim's point. If all the receiver has to do is connect up to an unencrypted access point, then it's actually easier than wired, and much easier than powerline.
I certainly didn't prove his point. I "proved" that most people can't even handle properly setting up a wireless network. Of course, "properly set up" means different things to different people. And now you want Dish to facilitate these users ?
 
A

Andrewwski

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 24, 2007
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One could also ask why desktop computers don't have built in wifi, or why Blu-Ray players don't have built in wifi. Not really necessary for things that aren't portable. If anything, just put a bridge adapter in.

And yeah...it seems a lot of people can't figure out wifi. At my house right now, I can get three unsecured networks (two being named "linksys" and "NETGEAR," one being someone's address...I wonder who that is...). One of them didn't even change the password to access the router config - I can use the default password and get into the settings page.
 
S

saiyan

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May 14, 2008
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0
Or just add one of these:

Linksys by Cisco Dual-Band Wireless-N Gaming Adapter WGA600N

Plug it into your eithernet port on the 622 or 722 and it will bridge to your wireless network.

Another dual-band N adapter to consider is be D-Link DAP-1522 which includes a 4 port gigabit switch and it can run as either a wireless AP or bridge.

So if you need to connect not just a VIP DVR but other devices such as a Blu-ray player, a gaming console or a VOIP phone in near proximity of each other, you just need to use one DAP-1522. It's perfect for the living room.
 
H

hendrix04

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 16, 2008
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No. You need an OS and browser to navigate the Internet. I have never seen hacking information on Partitioning a 622/722 to even install an OS like you can do to PS3.

An OS and browser is a BROAD term. The 622/722 both have an OS and browser. How do you think you "browse" the dish online movies? The xbox 360 does not have a web browser yet it can stream netflix...

To answer the original question though, no Dish receiver has the necessary software to stream netflix or any other web based video source (outside of dish's own download and watch stuff).
 
Hall

Hall

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Feb 14, 2004
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No. You need an OS and browser to navigate the Internet.
Dish's receivers most certainly have an OS. As for a "browser", do you mean an "internet browser" ? It already has a "system" browser that does just what Dish Network needs it to do. If Dish and Netflix came to an agreement, they'd modify their "browser" to work with each other. You do NOT need Internet Explorer or Firefox to do these kind of tasks.
 
S

SpaethCo

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Well there you go; you've proven Jim's point. If all the receiver has to do is connect up to an unencrypted access point, then it's actually easier than wired, and much easier than powerline.
.. and much easier to accidentally associate with your neighbor's access point.

One of the functions they are performing with the network connection is validating that multiple receivers are installed at the same location. If a receiver at one end of your house associates to wireless network of the neighbor to your left, and the receiver at the other end of your house associates to the neighbor to your right, even though you have a valid installation it would appear when the receivers checked in that your account is in violation.

The other problem is longevity. While the 802.3 copper Ethernet spec has been essentially the same standard since the 1980s, the 802.11 spec has had several iterations of both transmission (802.11a/b/g/n) and security (wep/wpa/tkip/aes) in just the last couple years. Satellite receivers have a rather long estimated usable life -- the 722 has been shipping since 2007 and will likely be an actively supported receiver (ie, software updates) for at least another 5 years or so.
 
tedb3rd

tedb3rd

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Wireless would be nice... until you get one idiot with a receiver and a neighbor-idiot who setup a wireless router... Now idiot A's receiver logs into idiot B's router... Idiot A downloads a bunch of on-demand movie's via idiot B's internet that has a bandwidth limit (or something along those lines). Now, guess who's in the middle of this "love triangle"--yup, Dish Network.
 
Scott Greczkowski

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Receivers like the 622 / 722 run on a special version of UNIX and all menus that you see are HTML menus, so because of that I would say yes they have a browser built in, however they are tied down to just browse what Dish wants you to access.
 
E

etrin

Active SatelliteGuys Member
Dec 11, 2008
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even if you connect to the unit exactly what can you do once you get there LOL
 
TheKrell

TheKrell

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I like dahenny's answer best.
I wish Dish would just do as my ISP does...ISP says, "We don't support anything having to do with a network. Set your network up at your own peril".
I don't believe it's Dish's responsibility to wire up the Ethernet jack when they do (i.e. pay for) an installation. They certainly don't supply a HomePlug bridge to your wired network, nor do they fish cat5 cable through attic, walls, or crawl space to get to your router that way. So why should it suddenly be Dish's responsibility to set up a wireless link correctly, when they don't hook it up at all via any means?

I can't contradict anybody's explanation of the support problem from Dish's point of view. I'm just saying it's a bogus reason for not adding dirt-cheap wifi adapters inside current generation receivers. The HomePlug adapter costs more.
 

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