Grounding The System Question

K

kasitrol@yahoo.com

Thread Starter
Member
Oct 17, 2006
11
0
I know that the RG6 from the LNB to the Receiver must be grounded through a grounding block. My question is how far / or close does the grounding block have to be to the LNB's? Can I run a long RG6 30 Ft. before attaching to the grounding block and the LNB? In other words LNB---30Ft RG6---Grounding Block then from the Grounding Block to the reciever? Also is it ok to bury standard RG6 in the ground?
 
B

bhelms

Retired & lovin' it!
Lifetime Supporter
Feb 26, 2006
7,795
853
Central PA
Per the NEC, the coax ground block needs to be at your point of entry into your house. The ground connection itself should be bonded to your main entrance's ground. There should also be a ground from the dish or mount to the ground block. Some coaxes provide an attached "messenger" wire for this purpose. I use 10 ga. THHN. There is no limit to the distance between the ground block and the LNBs beyond the equipment constraints, e.g. max 200' total run from the receiver to the LNBs with DP/DPP equipment.

There is special RG-6 made for direct burial. Ask the retailers. Standard coax could go in conduit, however...
 
Mike_H

Mike_H

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 8, 2003
770
5
Twin Cities, MN
A small correction. The 5ft rule applies to when grounding to a water pipe and requires you to ground on the pipe within 5 feet of the pipe entering the building.

It's best to mount your antenna close to your electrical service, then you can easily ground to that.

See this website, the info appears correct.
http://dbsinstall.com/whatis/Whatisgood-5.htm
 
J

jhsands

New Member
Nov 8, 2006
4
0
I buy 10' ground rods and weld a V tip on the end to make ground penetration easy. Put entry a ground block wherever I feel like it ;)
 
Liquidforce88

Liquidforce88

SatelliteGuys Pro
Feb 3, 2005
3,738
39
The Land Of OZ
Are you back bonding that ground rod to the house electric? If not that does not meet code either.
 
P

PIMP_2

Member
Oct 16, 2006
13
0
with all that being said, keep in mind E* new ground policy also states that the ground wire from ground block to ground source can now no longer be more than 20ft. you also want to make sure that from the ground block, you have a shorter ground wire than you do coax to the receiver. Electricity takes shortest path of resistance. Also if you stick to the 4" service loop guidlines, that will also be a second backup for lightning, not very many electrical surges rated at several hundred million volts/several hundred thousand amps can pass through a 4" bend of RG6, it will just blow through at the bend.
 
Mike_H

Mike_H

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 8, 2003
770
5
Twin Cities, MN
Last edited:
Kandiru

Kandiru

SatelliteGuys Guru
Dec 1, 2005
144
0
I use a grounding block that simly grounds the outside layer or the RG6. I use compression connectors. The rod is hammered into the ground next to the Dish 1000 pole and a second copper wire comes from the Dish mount itself (also metal). Total overkill it stands inches from a 50 ft tall building. Total 4 ft to the house, cable is buried. The inside end inserts into a Panamax 5500Pro surge suppressor/voltage regulator, that BTW also provides isolated power to the projector for noise free HD. Of course the PQ is xxxxd up by HDLite, xxxx xxx Charlie very much :)
 
F

FantasyChannel

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 9, 2006
169
0
Do TV networks/stations ground their systems too?
 
Mike_H

Mike_H

SatelliteGuys Pro
Sep 8, 2003
770
5
Twin Cities, MN
If your ground rod isn't bonded to the house ground, a ground loop could* be created putting a voltage potential on your receiver. Be careful.

Yes, any antenna placed into the air is grounded by the installers. Television, radio, cell towers all are well grounded with thought towards both electronic protection, human protection as well as lightning protection.
 
whatchel1

whatchel1

SatelliteGuys Master
Sep 30, 2006
9,099
48
Great High Plains
No kidding

Do TV networks/stations ground their systems too?
Good God yes. They are done on what is called a star system. everything is ground to 1 point and it runs from that in what is called a star. That way there is no different ground potential difference between all the different equipment. In transmitters there will be 2 and 3 inch wide copper ground strips run to solid earth ground. There are some wicked big amps and volts in a transmitter system that can kill dead instantly. I have myself been bit but 480vac from an FM transmitter. If it had been DC It would not have survived since it was AC it hit me then kicked me off on the reverse phase. It left burns in the center of my palms. I hurt like I had the flu for 2 days after it. It would have killed me if the x-mitter had not been well grounded and most of it went to ground.
:eek:
 
F

FantasyChannel

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jan 9, 2006
169
0
Good God yes. They are done on what is called a star system. everything is ground to 1 point and it runs from that in what is called a star. That way there is no different ground potential difference between all the different equipment. In transmitters there will be 2 and 3 inch wide copper ground strips run to solid earth ground. There are some wicked big amps and volts in a transmitter system that can kill dead instantly. I have myself been bit but 480vac from an FM transmitter. If it had been DC It would not have survived since it was AC it hit me then kicked me off on the reverse phase. It left burns in the center of my palms. I hurt like I had the flu for 2 days after it. It would have killed me if the x-mitter had not been well grounded and most of it went to ground.
:eek:

thanks that's interesting to know. My system is grounded.
 

Similar threads

Y
Replies
1
Views
998
SimpleSimon
SimpleSimon
J
Replies
7
Views
2K
vegassatellite
vegassatellite
A
Replies
9
Views
1K
andyg
A
R
Replies
18
Views
3K
DucTape
DucTape
ClarkGable
Replies
8
Views
1K
B

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top