HN9000 relocation (how?)

cpbenny

Thread Starter
New Member
Jul 11, 2010
4
0
San Diego
I have an HN9000 system a DAPT and a squinter and would like the ability to relocate the system across the US. I saw in a old posting that this could be done by contacting the Huhesnet NOC. Can someone tell me how to do this or the number to the NOC. Much apprecaited. I have been on the Hughesnet help line for hours to no avail.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
In the old days, installers used to call the NOC to get the customer cross-polled, but that doesn't happen anymore. I have no idea of what "helpline" you called, but there's no reason whatsoever that HughesNet tech support can't simply send an installer to do the job for you (no, they won't let you do it yourself). But unlike DirecTV, don't expect to get it done for free.

//greg//
 

cpbenny

Thread Starter
New Member
Jul 11, 2010
4
0
San Diego
Thanks. I actually moved it to a location on a military test range and I can not have an installer come set it up.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
I suspect there's more to this than you're lettin' on. I held a TS/SPECAT/NATO COSMIC/Crypto access clearance during my entire Navy career. Several of those years were in/around SDiego. I don't recall of a single instance where provisions couldn't be made to permit controlled access to an outside contractor.

In the unlikely event that such a place actually does exist, perhaps you should consider obtaining a Hughes installer certification for yourself.

//greg//
 

cpbenny

Thread Starter
New Member
Jul 11, 2010
4
0
San Diego
Well I am actually in a test range in New Mexico. It is not impossible to get someone on, but we are probably a couple hours away from any installer and I only plan to be here two to three days.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
Well, you bought the wrong tool for the job then. If you had a HN7000, a tripod configuration can be set up and torn down in no time. RV enthusiasts do it all the time. They tear it down before moving on to the next location, then set it up all over again after arrival. Can't do that with a HN9000, it's a Ka-band spotbeam system. Any time it's moved, it goes either to a different location under it's assigned spot beam - or to another spot beam entirely. Each move requires recommissioning, and moving to completely different spot beam might even involve creating a new account. But I'm not 100% positive on that last part. At any rate - even though I haven't confirmed this on the coverage map - it's not likely SDiego and NM share a common spot beam.

Not so with the Ku-band HN7000. As long as you can see the assigned satellite, you can move it anywhere - without the need for recommissioning.

//greg//
 
Last edited:

tobifelinis

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
May 10, 2009
27
0
Tombstone, Az
Just out of curosity have you tried to run the installation?

Most reports that I have seen indicate that once you enter the pointing mode that you can not exit it unless the NOC has OKed it. Couriuous if you can exit the pointing mode with your DAPT.
 

HCI

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 19, 2005
2,580
0
land of the ice and snow
You will not be able to move it unless the noc releases the modem for input of new GPS cords. If you put new ones in it will lock the modem saying relocation unauthorized. You can also only move it 2 times per year. Hughes will also not let you do it without a FSO being created and an installer calling in to get the modem authorized to move.
 

HCI

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 19, 2005
2,580
0
land of the ice and snow
Just out of curosity have you tried to run the installation?

Most reports that I have seen indicate that once you enter the pointing mode that you can not exit it unless the NOC has OKed it. Couriuous if you can exit the pointing mode with your DAPT.
Once you enter pointing you can abort pointing or use last known good configuration and it will default back to the last successful parameters that the system worked with.
 

tobifelinis

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
May 10, 2009
27
0
Tombstone, Az
I have had several people tell me that once they entered the pointing mode it covered up the abort point button and they could not stop the pointing.

I have done it a couple of times but I had to use 169.254.0.1 to get back to the abort point button.
 

HCI

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 19, 2005
2,580
0
land of the ice and snow
I have had several people tell me that once they entered the pointing mode it covered up the abort point button and they could not stop the pointing.

I have done it a couple of times but I had to use 169.254.0.1 to get back to the abort point button.
If you go to the installation page where you put the parameters in you will see the use last successful parameters. This is what I do every time I have a service call and it needs to be re pointed. Once the modem has the initial set of squint values which is gotten in the installation the modem can be re pointed and aborted at any time. Also the newest 9000 firmware should not revert the modem back to the 169 address in cases of modem lock loss, it should be the 192 address. This was causing tech support to many issues when customers called in without service and could not walk the customer into getting into the modem status.
 

icewalk17

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
cpbenny said:
I have tried the installation and as "The Tate" states it says relelocation not authorized.
I am a Beta tester and I also recently moved or relocated an HN9000 system. You must have a relocation authorization or the commissioning will fail when attempted key registration. I let the installer hook up the main 9000 and my other beta 9000 I did myself, actually it's very simple. You can copy your old install parameters as the only change in values you will need to input are the new GPS coordinates. Also as my main site was already pointed, I was simply able to abort pointing. The message you see regarding authorization, as I said is because you must call Hughes(Tech Support Works) and obtain the "relocation authorization" or it will stall and fail when attempting to register during initial commisioning.
 

jamesjoy2

New Member
Jul 11, 2008
3
0
It is against FCC regulations for anyone who is not certified as a return installer to activate and/or point/repoint any transmitting system used by HUGHES. (Although that doesn't stop some people. ) The KA relocation system just helps to police that issue.
 

Elchucko

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 15, 2005
174
2
Full time RVer
It is against FCC regulations for anyone who is not certified as a return installer to activate and/or point/repoint any transmitting system used by HUGHES. (Although that doesn't stop some people. ) The KA relocation system just helps to police that issue.
If this statement is true, then all Motosat owners are violating the law! I don't think you know what you are talking about!
 

jamesjoy2

New Member
Jul 11, 2008
3
0
If this statement is true, then all Motosat owners are violating the law! I don't think you know what you are talking about!
I suppose you could be correct about the exact wording of my statement, but even MotoSat, (the automated antenna deployment system) still must meet FCC regulations and ALSO MUST BE INSTALLED BY AN FCC CERTIFIED INSTALLER. The way that Motosat owners are legal to deploy their dish, is that they are using automated deployment software. It is regulated, and you can find it in the Code.
 
Last edited:

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
It is against FCC regulations for anyone who is not certified as a return installer to activate and/or point/repoint any transmitting system used by HUGHES. (Although that doesn't stop some people. ) The KA relocation system just helps to police that issue.
Common misperception James, and it has nothing to do with whether a system is Ka- or Ku-. Short of ensuring that equipment is certified safe for use by the general public, the FCC doesn't involve itself at the consumer level in the low power arena (typically 4 watts and less). If they did, every HughesNet customer would have to have a FCC license. As it is, even Hughes certified installers aren't required to have licenses. FCC involvement is higher up the food chain, in the area of policing potential satellite interference. They have the power to kick entire networks right off the satellite in the case of major violations, which would cost providers some really big bucks. So providers like Hughes enforce measures within their own networks to prevent this from happening. One of them is the requirement that a Hughes-certified (not FCC certified) installer perform all installation/repair work on their DW- and HN- systems here in America.MotoSat has demonstrated their auto-pointing system is reliably non-interfering, so they get a waiver. There is also some leniency granted toward the tripod community. And there are provisions to accommodate snow-birds, permitting system relocation between summer/winter homes. You might also be interested to know that the consumer end of Hughes HX-hardware is marketed as "self-install".Granted, the HX-systems are pretty much outside the US for the moment, Hughes currently has quite a few HX-systems deployed throughout the US on a test basis.

//greg//
 

Zogman

Member
Oct 30, 2010
12
0
Little Rock, AR area
Elchucko, YOU have no idea what you're talking about. The MotoSat systems use a GPS system to automatically point the antenna, removing the human element, which is why you have to be licensed by the FCC to install/repair a non self-pointing system as they emit microwaves. The MotoSat's, et al. are approved for use by the FCC because they do not require a licensed FCC technician, as the GPS and pointing module, using electric motors, points/peaks the antenna keeping the end user at a safe distance from the transmitter emitting the microwaves. So, in response to your obtuse statement, no, MotoSat owners are not violating the law. Do you really think that they'd be allowed to sell the system if it were illegal? Before attacking someone, and telling them they don't know what they're talking about, get your facts straight, or you just make yourself look like a imbecile. jamesjoy2 seems to be fairly versed in Hughes, maybe you should listen to what he has to say, or ask me first, I've been doing Hughes for ten years now, and know quite a bit. I'm a certified trainer, and know pretty much anything about every system that HNS has on the market, as I fix them for a living. So, before making statements that you have no clue about, ask someone that does, and definitely don't criticize their intelligence as they'll make you look like a simpleton as I just have done. Have a nice day!
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
which is why you have to be licensed by the FCC to install/repair a non self-pointing system as they emit microwaves.
No Zog, you don't ! I challenge you and James to upload a copy of this alleged FCC license "to install/repair a (HughesNet) non self-pointing system". Hint: to avoid looking like an imbecile yourself, do NOT confuse the HughesNet installer certificate with a FCC license !!
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 0, Members: 0, Guests: 0)

Latest posts

Top