HN9000 relocation (how?)

Elchucko

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 15, 2005
174
2
Full time RVer
Elchucko, YOU have no idea what you're talking about. The MotoSat systems use a GPS system to automatically point the antenna, removing the human element, which is why you have to be licensed by the FCC to install/repair a non self-pointing system as they emit microwaves. The MotoSat's, et al. are approved for use by the FCC because they do not require a licensed FCC technician, as the GPS and pointing module, using electric motors, points/peaks the antenna keeping the end user at a safe distance from the transmitter emitting the microwaves. So, in response to your obtuse statement, no, MotoSat owners are not violating the law. Do you really think that they'd be allowed to sell the system if it were illegal? Before attacking someone, and telling them they don't know what they're talking about, get your facts straight, or you just make yourself look like a imbecile. jamesjoy2 seems to be fairly versed in Hughes, maybe you should listen to what he has to say, or ask me first, I've been doing Hughes for ten years now, and know quite a bit. I'm a certified trainer, and know pretty much anything about every system that HNS has on the market, as I fix them for a living. So, before making statements that you have no clue about, ask someone that does, and definitely don't criticize their intelligence as they'll make you look like a simpleton as I just have done. Have a nice day!
Please note that my statement was preceded with "If" which implies certain conditions. Until you can provide the proof of this alleged FCC document, you place yourself in the same category.

I have been a Motosat owner for over six years and have more than the average knowledge about this product. I know that I am not violating the law. I was at the Motosat/Datastorm facility two days ago to have my system overhauled. I asked about this requirement for a "license" for a Datastorm user with a tripod and dish (something that I also have when trees are in the way). Grohgreg seems to be right, not you.

As you stated in another post: "If you're going to make a statement, make sure you know what you're talking about. If you fail to do so, you only make yourself look stupid."
 
Dec 11, 2010
5
0
California
Hi Benny, This will piss some off. I use Hughes and have a HN7000. I travel with a RV and set-up my internet where ever i'm at. Using a laptop and open the 192.168.0.1 hughes has a install page. It's not that easy but with a little practice you can do it. It will give you the setup for your dish by zip. You will need to know what Satellite your to use? A list is in the setup. I hope this hopes.
 

HCI

SatelliteGuys Pro
Jun 19, 2005
2,580
0
land of the ice and snow
Hi Benny, This will piss some off. I use Hughes and have a HN7000. I travel with a RV and set-up my internet where ever i'm at. Using a laptop and open the 192.168.0.1 hughes has a install page. It's not that easy but with a little practice you can do it. It will give you the setup for your dish by zip. You will need to know what Satellite your to use? A list is in the setup. I hope this hopes.
The 9000 uses GPS coordinates instead of zip codes. Yes with a 9000 you can go to the system status screen to view the signal strength, and assuming you are in a beam that is the same polarity as the one the modem was originally set up in, you can get signal. However, the modems bootup process involves probing "which is known as ranging on the 7000" if the modem thinks it's X amount of distance from the satellite but it's really Y amount of distance it is going to fail. If you change the GPS coordinates without Hughes approving the move, the modem will say relocation not authorized. I think you can only move the modem twice in one year also.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
The other little sticking point with a HN9000 self-move is that - yes, you can relocate. Maybe you'll find the satellite, maybe even get a signal. But you'll never reconnect with your account. It's still back on the beam you just left. In order to reconnect, Hughes needs to move your account to another server AND they will insist that you get a certified installer to finalize the connection on your end. Ya can't win.

//greg//
 

icewalk17

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
In my case as I am advanced BETA tester I have 2 different 9000 systems. One is the standard DSS 9000, the other with different SAN & classified beyond that. I can say that when I moved I did need an installer here for regular 9000 to do the GPS/Pointing but for the other I was able to abort pointing but you will not be able to get around contacting Hughes for relocation authorization which is essential during commissioning to get to TX Code 25 full operational status. I also have and use Hughes tools & equipment but it's only BETA available and I really can't go beyond that other than to say once public will aid or help in many different ways & situations.
 

Zogman

Member
Oct 30, 2010
12
0
Little Rock, AR area
My bad, you're right. I'm so used to telling customer's that you have to be licensed by the FCC, so that they don't try and mess with the system. You only require a HughesNet Installer ID to install or service a HughesNet system. The whole point I was trying to make is that the difference in a customer with a mobile, self-deploying system, and a fixed one is: a mobile system does not require a Hughes Certified Installer to deploy/point antenna, due to the GPS and actuators taking the human element out of the pointing process; therefore eliminating possible exposure to microwaves (which is why a Hughes Certified Installer is needed to point a fixed PES{Personal Earth Station}, as they are educated on avoiding microwave RF exposure.) In other words, the moral of the story is NO you don't need an FCC license, but yes you do need to be HughesNet certified to perform work on any HughesNet two-way system that is not self-deploying, and the reason being that Hughes does not want people "cooking their brains". In self-defense though, the FCC oversees the entire process, and sets the guidelines, as they are in control of the bandwidth. I apologize, and did not mean to offend, but you should hear some of the stuff that I've heard customers tell me what their installers have told them. And also, some of the stuff I've read on here. Nine times out of ten, common sense prevails. Tate, I work for myself! Seriously though, I'm a Hughes subcontractor for a major service company. I also have some installers doing fulfillment work for P-10. I'm assuming you do work for P-10 too?
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
eliminating possible exposure to microwaves (which is why a Hughes Certified Installer is needed to point a fixed PES{Personal Earth Station}, as they are educated on avoiding microwave RF exposure.)
If that's the extent of your rationale, then you still don't get it. The FCC is NOT concerned with such low power emissions - typically below 4-5 watts. That's why most CB and FRS radios (and cell phones) don't require individual FCC licensing. If they did, HughesNet customers themselves would be required to have a FCC license as well. Just ask the HAM community. The whole thrust of the installer certification is to prevent satellite interference. There are a lot of birds orbiting up there, and incompetently swinging a dish around - assuming that you'll actually catch the right signal eventually - is just what they DON'T want. Hughes has built in a partial fail-safe to prevent this; the feature where the transmitter is disabled unless/until the correct satellite parameters are loaded into the modem AND the defined signal is detected. Where the installer certification comes in, is to make damn sure that the right parameters are defined in the first place, which keeps the transmitter offline AND off the wrong satellite or transponder.

//greg//
 

Zogman

Member
Oct 30, 2010
12
0
Little Rock, AR area
I understand that, Greg. If the FCC is not concerned, then why is there warning stickers on the RFU? Yes, I understand that you have an in-depth knowledge of satellites. I'm talking about HughesNet, not the high-wattage stuff you're referring to. This is the broadband forum about HughesNet, WildBlue, right? I'm sure your way smarter than I am in this field, but you're missing the point. Self-deploying vs. PES, and the difference in the two. But, if you don't think the FCC regulates HughesNet, than I don't know what to say, other than you are wrong.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
In fact I did spend an entire career supporting two-way satellite telecommunications for the Department of Defense. During said career, reasonable interaction with the FCC was unavoidable. At some point in time I probably taught the people who taught the people that are teaching the Hughes certification classes now. So just because I'm now retired doesn't mean that I'm still not reasonably current on such matters. That said, neither of us can be responsible if some of the info being put out in selected certification classes is corrupt.

Tell your customers what you want Zog, there's a sucker born every minute. The sad part is that you apparently actually believe what you're telling them.

//greg//
 

Zogman

Member
Oct 30, 2010
12
0
Little Rock, AR area
I like the satellite interference statement, although it doesn't make sense. The only bird you can point to is the one you define in the parameters, as stated, which prevents the so-called interference. As far as interference goes though, that's what the ACP function is for, to ensure proper pointing as to reduce bleed over on other transponders. It seems like you do know a lot about satellites, just not that much about HughesNet, Greg.
 

Zogman

Member
Oct 30, 2010
12
0
Little Rock, AR area
This is the HughesNet Thread, right? How do we keep steering off course, with a ridiculous pissing contest? And, you never did answer the question, are you a certified spokesman for the FCC?
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
This is the HughesNet Thread, right? How do we keep steering off course, with a ridiculous pissing contest? And, you never did answer the question, are you a certified spokesman for the FCC?
Pot, kettle Zog. And this is a HN9000 relocation thread. But it's pretty clear that I'm not the one that's confused. Up through 12-28 we WERE talking about the HN9000. Then you revived the thread today with this FCC crap.

//greg//
 

Clay Turnbull

New Member
Jan 26, 2011
1
0
05353
I'm relocating an HN9000 from it's prior owners site in New Hampshire to a new location about 50 miles away. How do I determine the correct Lat/Lon settings for the dish? What sat am I aiming at and where is it in the ski? Thanks from a rookie.
 

grohgreg

SatelliteGuys Pro
Aug 21, 2008
523
1
Dawson Springs, KY
Determining latitude and longitude is the least of your problems Clay. I suggest you read this thread through from the beginning, then re-evaluate.

//greg//
 

tobifelinis

Well-Known SatelliteGuys Member
May 10, 2009
27
0
Tombstone, Az
I'm relocating an HN9000 from it's prior owners site in New Hampshire to a new location about 50 miles away. How do I determine the correct Lat/Lon settings for the dish? What sat am I aiming at and where is it in the ski? Thanks from a rookie.
Moving 50 miles you might get away with leaving everything the same. Provided you keep the old owners account (not likely). If you get a new account you are going to have to have an installer. This has been discused several times here and on other forums. You are better off to have a complet new install with new equipment than to try and use used equipment the cost will be the same.

You cannot self install a 9000 read this thread. The fact that you do not know how to determine lat/ long (try google maps) and do not know which satellite that all 9000's are aimed at in it self says that you do not hve the skill to install a 9000.
 

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